More than 'just' Lyme:

Discussion in 'Lyme Disease Archives' started by victoria, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. victoria

    victoria New Member

    From LymeInfo@yahoogroups email - the first is from a member of LDA; second letter is from Ritchie Shoemaker:

    ====================

    Two Letters to the Editor recently appeared at DelmarvaNow.com, the internet publication of The Daily Times of Salisbury, Maryland. Here are both letters in the order they appeared. -

    - -

    Your View:
    Bitten by a tick? You've got a lot more than just Lyme disease to worry about Friday, January 22, 2010 http://www.delmarvanow.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=20101220337

    While many people have heard of Lyme disease, many more don't realize that ticks carry other diseases as well. One common tick-borne illness here on the Delmarva Peninsula is bartonella, commonly known as cat-scratch disease.

    An interesting sign of bartonella seen in children and adults is stretch marks --horizontal or vertical marks on the hips and back, and occasionally on the arms and legs.

    When parents contact the Lyme Disease Association of the Eastern Shore of Maryland because they suspect Lyme disease is the cause of their children's unusual and persistent health problems, we usually ask whether the children have stretch marks.

    It's amazing how many "yes" answers we get. With proper bartonella treatment, the stretch marks usually diminish and go away.

    In 2004, tick testing performed on ticks by a group of scientists found in New Jersey revealed a higher incidence of Bartonella than Lyme disease.

    The illness can also be contracted from a cat scratch, fleas or other animal and insect sources. It can have serious health effects.

    Anyone who has been diagnosed with or treated for Lyme disease should insist no being tested for other tick-borne diseases, because if you caught Lyme disease from a tick, chances are you could have another infection as well. Babesia microti, babesia duncani, erlichia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis and mycoplasmas are a few of the more common tick-borne illnesses found on the Delmarva Peninsula.

    Marilyn B. Williams, Hebron, Maryland Williams is a member of the Lyme Disease Association of the Eastern Shore of Maryland board. The LDAESM meets monthly on the last Monday of the month at the Greater Salisbury building in downtown Salisbury. Call
    410-749-LYME. -- Editor

    - - - - - - -

    Your View:
    Lyme patients don't need confusing information

    Tuesday, January 26, 2010
    http://www.delmarvanow.com/article/20100126/OPINION01/1260408/-1/newsfront2/Lyme-patients-don-t-need-confusing-information or http://tinyurl.com/yhb4jnm

    RE: "Bitten by a tick? You've got a lot more than just Lyme disease to worry about," Jan. 23

    In my practice I see Lyme patients from all over, especially those with persistent illness. Dog and deer ticks surely carry a diversity of organisms that can cause human illness. The Lyme community is awash with new concerns about putative co-infections, diagnosed on slipshod clinical criteria and labs whose methods are subject to intense criticism from academics and insurance carriers. Lyme disease -- and in those with genetic susceptibility, the intense inflammatory syndromes left over despite antibiotics -- are bad enough; we don't need unfounded ideas about co-infections.

    We have pathogenic apicomplexans on the Shore. Veterinarians worry about sarcocystis in horses; eimeria hurts chickens, rabbits and pigs. In other parts of the East Coast -- but not here -- we worry about another apicomplexan, Babesia microti. In the Pacific Northwest (only), a "new" apicomplexan, Babesia duncani is recently described.

    Many bartonella species cause illness in dogs; only two are confirmed sources of human illness. Some labs diagnose bartonella based on a blood smear; these diagnoses are wholly without merit.

    If a physician suggests you have an infection from a babesia organism that doesn't live here, seek a second opinion, especially if the diagnosis came from a "cash-only" lab. If told you have bartonella, make sure the diagnosis is supported by peer-reviewed literature.

    Inflammatory complications of Lyme aren't treated by more antibiotics. Be wary of those who prescribe IV antibiotics, especially those newer agents tat should only be used to treat life-threatening infections from multiply resistant organisms.

    Dr. Ritchie C. Shoemaker Pocomoke City, Maryland

    ===========================


    This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm
  2. TeaBisqit

    TeaBisqit Member

    Ticks carry a whole soup of pathogens, but it's not just ticks, mosquitos, black and green flies, and spiders can also carry pathogens. People always think it's just ticks and it's not. Any bug bite should be suspect for pathogens.

    Alternately, not every tick carries Lyme. A high percentage does, but there are actually still bugs out there that don't have it. Although they may have babseosis or a multitude of other pathogens in them. This is also why some people get bit and don't test Lyme positive, however, they are still sick with something. And it's important to try to get an infectious disease doctor who will take it seriously. If you are bit by any bug at all, you should insist on full tests for all infectious diseases they may carry, not just Lyme.
  3. victoria

    victoria New Member

    too many focus on "just lyme" and don't consider any of the other pathogens bugs carry...
    that's why I always refer to it as Lyme & Company. Tho I know it could be Lyme &/or Company.

    I think I read somewhere one researcher did say that ticks were considered one of the dirtiest insects.


  4. victoria

    victoria New Member

    too many focus on "just lyme" and don't consider any of the other pathogens bugs carry...
    that's why I always refer to it as Lyme & Company. Tho I know it could be Lyme &/or Company.

    I think I read somewhere one researcher did say that ticks were considered one of the dirtiest insects.

    but worst, the tests for most of the other pathogens are even more unreliable than the WB even by iGenex. Not everyone has the $$ to get tested. We spent about $10K the first year just on multiple tests on our son to try to get a better idea of what else he had besides Lyme (at least that one showed totally positive to CDC's tracking/surveillance standard). Nothing 'showed', but from symptoms and responses to abx etc, it was apparent there was also at least babesia and bartonella of some type.

    Not everybody can afford that... I can't afford it for myself, and chances are, little will show anyway sadly.



  5. Renae610

    Renae610 New Member

    Expert Dr. K said that if tests are negative, as you begin to treat, test again and it will be positive if you have these infections.

    Has anyone here noticed this to be true in your case?
  6. victoria

    victoria New Member

    I have read of others... if you look at some of the other lyme boards, you will see their stories.

    My son started out CDC positive... 6 months after beginning treatment, he was still CDC positive. We didn't have him tested again, tho he went thru 3.5 years of abx, due to $$ (out of pocket for us). But it was obvious, along with bartonella & babesia, due to symptoms & herxes.

    (I haven't spent the money on myself for any formal testing, just going by the fact that I've herxed to alternative treatments, and because I found I hadantibodies on an old Lyme test that I didn't even 'see' till this past summer of '09 (it was done in 2001 tho nobody said anything.)

    all the best,
    Victoria

  7. wandaifitstrue

    wandaifitstrue New Member

    In their motion in limine, Defendants seek to exclude the testimony of Plaintiff's expert Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker on grounds that his opinions fail to meet this jurisdiction's standards for admissibility articulated in Frye v. United States, 293 F. 1013 (D.C. Cir.1923) in three areas. Defendants claim:

    1) Dr. Shoemaker has diagnosed Plaintiff with a condition, "chronic biotoxin associated illness" caused by mold exposure, which is not a medical condition generally recognized or accepted within the medical community;

    2) Dr. Shoemaker's method of diagnosing this purported condition, the presence of three of six biomarkers — chemical features that indicate the presence or progress of disease in the body — is not accepted within the medical community; and

    3) Dr. Shoemaker's course of treatment for this purported condition, prescription of the drug Cholestryamine, is not generally accepted within the medical community.

    http://www.usmoldphysician.com/articles/shoemaker-testimony-rejected.html
  8. Marylee

    Marylee New Member

    I'm wondering HOW did tics come to carry mycoplasma? I thought that was something engineered as a biological weapon?

    Disgusting!