Must read-- about genetic biomarker for CFS

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by dojomo, Feb 28, 2003.

  1. dojomo

    dojomo New Member



    I found this study.....By CDC and others...UNBELIEVABLE!!!!

    If I am reading this right.....not only have they found a genetic biomarker..BUT.....The study says...."Several of the differentially expressed genes are associated with immunologic functions (e.g., CMRF35 antigen, IL-8, HD protein) and implicate immune dysfunction in the pathophysiology of CFS."

    So they CAN identify us and they KNOW it is an immunue disorder......I hope the CDC plans to expand this research

    THE STUDY:

    Utility of the blood for gene expression profiling and biomarker discovery in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Vernon SD, Unger ER, Dimulescu IM, Rajeevan M, Reeves WC.
    Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating illness lacking consistent anatomic lesions and eluding conventional laboratory diagnosis. Demonstration of the utility of the blood for gene expression profiling and biomarker discovery would have implications into the pathophysiology of CFS.

    The objective of this study was to determine if gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) could distinguish between subjects with CFS and healthy controls.

    Total RNA from PBMCs of five CFS cases and seventeen controls was labeled and hybridized to 1764 genes on filter arrays. Gene intensity values were analyzed by various classification algorithms and nonparametric statistical methods. The classification algorithms grouped the majority of the CFS cases together, and distinguished them from the healthy controls.

    Eight genes were differentially expressed in both an age-matched case-control analysis and when comparing all CFS cases to all controls.

    Several of the diffrentially expressed genes are associated with immunologic functions (e.g., CMRF35 antigen, IL-8, HD protein) and implicate immune dysfunction in the pathophysiology of CFS. These results successfully demonstrate the utility of the blood for gene expression profiling to distinguish subjects with CFS from healthy controls and for identifying genes that could serve as CFS biomarkers.

    PMID: 12590173 [PubMed - in process
    Dis Markers. 2002;18(4):193-9


    [This Message was Edited on 02/28/2003]
  2. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Has enabled this kind of research and, hopefully, will expose defective genes in all kinds of illnesses. This should be big-time news in newspapers and on all the news channels. I guess we just can't compete with George W and Saddam. At least we can celebrate amongst ourselves.

    This was a very, very small sample statistically, but nonetheless, the outcome certainly calls for more research along these lines. Unfortunately, since the death of that teenager from genetic treatment of an illness, all genetic treatments have been put on hold. Soooooo, we can identify defective genes, but right now anyway, there is no treatment available to correct them. Progress is slow.

    Thank you so much for sharing this with us.

    Love, Mikie
  3. TerriM

    TerriM New Member

    the cdc study that is mentioned in articles about author Laura Hillenbrand and her struggles with CFS
  4. dojomo

    dojomo New Member

    There seems to be a lot of gliches in the Gene Therapy trials lately. But wouldn't it be nice to just take a blood test and get a diagnosis...and maybe then they could even give this DD a decent name.

    I don't know why there isn't more talk about this..esp being a CDC study......I noticed it was published in 2002 sometime.

    I think I will write to them and ask what became of that study and do they plan on doing anymore.....I'm sure everyone of us would be willing to give blood for this......I'll let you know if they respond.........DJ