Name these 3 pics! :)

Discussion in 'Homebound/Bedbound' started by ConfusedInPA, Sep 22, 2015.

  1. ConfusedInPA

    ConfusedInPA Well-Known Member

    Hi y'all,

    I found some pics and I'll post all three here in this one thread. Identify your guesses as 1, 2, or 3. :)

    Here we go, good luck!


    *******************************

    PICTURE NUMBER 1

    name this pic 2.jpg


    PICTURE NUMBER 2

    name this pic 3.jpg


    PICTURE NUMBER 3

    name this pic 4.JPG


    Good luck, have fun!!

    Diane :D
  2. bct

    bct Active Member

    #1: Alligator Snapping Turtle.
    # 2: Corn varieties.
    #3: Slime Mould species I think......
  3. rockgor

    rockgor Well-Known Member

    Hi Diane

    An interesting collection of pics. I agree with Barry's analysis. Those snapping turtles
    are fierce. Adults, I read, often weigh over 200 pounds. Not something you'd want to
    meet in the wild or your bathtub.

    The corn is Indian corn. My mother used to grow it in her garden. She also grew
    straw flowers which she dried and gourds. Then every fall we drove around the country
    side and walked through the woods and picked dried flowers and stems. All of
    which she combined into bouquets and centerpieces for the table. I'd post a
    picture, but can't find anything similar on the net. Here's a pic of straw flowers though.
    She dried them by hanging them upside down from a coat hanger.

    [​IMG]

    I don't know about that slime, but Barry's probably right. Or it might be
    a fragment of some bride's gown that was torn loose during the chivaree.

    Rock
  4. ConfusedInPA

    ConfusedInPA Well-Known Member

    Hi Barry and Rock,

    1) ALLIGATOR SNAPPING TURTLE is CORRECT!! :) (looks fierce!)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alligator_snapping_turtle

    2) I've always called this INDIAN CORN, the pic I posted is called GEM corn.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GEM_corn.jpg

    Take a look at these pics, from geekologie:
    Rainbow Glass Gem Corn
    http://geekologie.com/2012/05/taste-the-rainbow-glass-gem-corn-looks-l.php

    Is this corn edible??

    3) FROST FLOWER

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frost_flower

    Barry, I don't know if mold is involved; according to my quick review of wiki, I didn't see the word "mold" mentioned.

    I will declare both Barry and Rock "co-winners". I know nothing about the pics I posted. I don't know where I was browsing, but I thought these pics were interesting for a game. :)

    Please post if you have more info on these pics! :)

    Diane, gonna google again :p


    PS: Forgot to mention, Rock--the straw flowers are lovely!
  5. rockgor

    rockgor Well-Known Member

    Diane
    Never heard of anybody trying to eat Indian corn. I never thought about whether or
    not the Indians did. Anyway I think it's like the corn the farmers grew in the fields.
    Food for cattle. People eat sweet corn. Lemme see what I can find.

    OK, the Iowa Farm Growers Association says you can eat Indian corn, but it is
    very bland with no sweetness. The sugar in it has turned to starch. Some colored
    corn (blue?) is ground into corn meal and then used to make tacos, cornmeal, etc.

    That reminds me. My mother used to make corn fritters now and then. I think
    she used creamed corn. They were delicious. Haven't heard of them for half a
    century. The site for the glass corn is amazing. It does look like the work of
    a glass blower. Never heard of frost flowers. Back in Minnesota the trees
    would sometimes get coated with ice during the winter. When the sunlight
    hit that ice, the trees looked like they were filled with diamonds. I've read
    a lot of books set in snow country. I only remember one author who
    mentioned this spectacular display.

    Rock
  6. ConfusedInPA

    ConfusedInPA Well-Known Member

    Hi Rock ---

    OOOOHHH,

    CORN FRITTERS. I love them. Grew up eating them. Made with canned creamed corn.

    We also had POTATO FRITTERS, made with leftover mashed potatoes, bread crumbs, egg and diced onion.

    And POTATO PANCAKES, a Polish staple! :)

    I'm getting hungry. I have to get the dishwasher loaded. And Kevin's supper on the stove (homemade chicken burgers -- he doesn't mind reheating). Then clean up that "mess." And then feed me! :)

    Diane :cool:
  7. gb66

    gb66 Well-Known Member

    Think I'll look for a corn fritter recipe! GB
  8. rockgor

    rockgor Well-Known Member

    Hi KIds

    Diane, Never heard of potato fritters until some months back. Gordon made
    them as an experiment. They were OK, but I certainly wouldn't go to that
    much trouble.

    Gotta watch out with those corn fritters. My mother wouldn't let us kids in the
    kitchen whenever she was making anything that involved a pot of hot oil.

    She also made wonderful popovers. They were huge and hollow inside. I've had
    things called popovers from restaurants and bakeries. None of them were at all
    like the popovers she produced.

    Good luck with the fritters, GB.
    Rock
    gb66 likes this.
  9. bct

    bct Active Member

    Popovers: YUM! My mum used to cook them and they were exactly like Rock describes. Incredibly good. Mum also made Yorkshire puddings; delicious.
    rockgor likes this.
  10. ConfusedInPA

    ConfusedInPA Well-Known Member

    Hi y'all,

    I'm getting hungry again! :)

    GB, good luck with finding a corn fritter recipe! Let us know how they turn out. I don't have a recipe to share, just what I remember from my childhood.

    I don't think we threw out any leftovers. Cooked food was frozen, and used later. We'd use leftover meat, thawed and put through a meat grinder, then sauteed, seasoned and used for homemade meat pierogi filling! :) Or, if it wouldn't freeze well, like mashed potatoes -- then we'd occasionally have potato fritters. Corn fritters were definitely tastier than potato fritters.

    My mom and grandma never used a deep fryer. Just a coating of oil in a cast iron pan, to saute.

    I used to be a so-so bread baker, then I got some books from the library. And I learned so much that we ordered 2 or 3 of the books from Amazon. One of those recipes that I made quite a bit (besides regular bread, buns, rolls) was popovers. So delicious.

    Has anyone made homemade turnovers?? I'd make the filling -- cooked apples, spices, etc. -- then use store-bought phyllo (or filo) dough. Then baked. Oh goodness, delicious.

    Great posts, y'all.

    Diane :)
  11. rockgor

    rockgor Well-Known Member

    Hi Kids

    Gordon has just about every kitchen machine and gadget known.
    Actually I lived with him for 7 years before I found out he owned a
    Cuisinart. Anyhoo back in the 80s he bought a bread machine.
    Made bread every week for a couple months. It's been stored away
    every since. He also has a plastic gadget you crimp around the
    dough or wrapper to make a dumpling.

    Gordon makes Chinese dumplings regularly. Some are made with won ton
    wrappers. Some have a translucent wrapper. Look kinda like the
    filling was swallowed by a jelly fish.

    I only used phyllo dough once. I used to enclose some sort of chicken dish.
    I think it had broccoli and cheese in it. Can't remember. It was a long
    time ago: 1989. For my son's High School Graduation Party. Everything
    was a success. The party, the dish, the graduation.

    I remember a fragment of the valedictorian's speech. Something
    about, "Get in your Beemer and drive down the highway of life."
    Wonder what that young man is doing today.

    Reminds me of the state motto of Kansas: To the stars with difficulty.

    Ad Astra per Aspera
    Rock