NEW book: Herbal treatment for LYME

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by victoria, Aug 14, 2005.

  1. victoria

    victoria New Member

    I checked but couldn't see where anyone discussed this book; I have it on order, sounds very interesting - thought many of you would be interested in it too!

    has anyone read it yet?
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    Healing Lyme: Natural Healing and Prevention of Lyme Borreliosis and Its Coinfections

    Stephen Harrod Buhner; Foreword by Wendy Leffel, M.D.
    sold by Amazon

    "Anyone touched by Lyme disease-patients, their families, or health care practitioners-will find this insightful and thorough book to be the essential guide for Lyme disease and its treatment. A hopeful, life altering book." -Wendy Leffel, M.D.

    Despite Centers for Disease Control estimates that only 20,000 new Lyme disease infections occur each year, the true figure, as Harvard medical school researchers have found, nearly approaches 200,000. Symptoms run from mild lethargy to severe arthritis to incapacitating mental dysfunction. And despite medical pronouncements to the contrary, extensive research has found that tests for the disease are not very reliable and antibiotics are only partially effective; up to 35 percent of those infected will not respond to treatment or will relapse. The spirochetes that cause Lyme are stealth pathogens-they can hide within cells or alter their form so that antibiotics cannot affect them. Lyme disease is, in fact, a potent, emerging epidemic disease for which technological medicine is only partially effective.

    Healing Lyme examines the leading, scientific research on Lyme infection, its tests and treatments, and outlines the most potent herbal medicines and supplements that offer help-either alone or in combination with antibiotics-for preventing and healing the disease. It is the essential guide to Lyme infection and its treatment.

    About the Author
    Stephen Harrod Buhner is a master herbalist, psychotherapist, and expert on indigenous and contemplative spiritual traditions. Much of his work and writing focuses on herbal and alternative medicine, deep ecology, and sacred plant medicine. He is the author of The Lost Language of Plants.

    Item Information
    Edition: Paperback
    Format: Herbal Repertory for Lyme Disease, Appendix, Resource Lists,
    References, Bibliography
    Pages: 6 x 9, 288 pages
    ISBN: 0-9708696-3-0
    Publisher: Raven Press
    Release Date: 2005-06-21

    ***

    Healing Lyme: Natural Healing And Prevention of Lyme Borreliosis And Its Coinfections (Paperback)
    by Stephen Harrod Buhner

    --------------------------------------------------------------
    List Price: $19.95
    Price: $13.57 and eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25.

    Book Description
    Healing Lyme examines the leading, scientific research on Lyme infection, its tests and treatments, and outlines the most potent herbal medicines and supplements that offer help-either alone or in combination with antibiotics-for preventing and healing the disease. It is the essential guide to Lyme infection and its treatment.

    From the Publisher
    * The first comprehensive book on herbal healing for Lyme disease
    * the most up-to-date analysis of Lyme research in print
    * Contains an herbal treatment compendium for all Lyme symptoms
    * Outlines natural approaches for preventing Lyme infection
    * Useful for both lay and professional readers
    * Treatment protocols and book data extensively referenced

    Foreword by Wendy Leffel, M.D.
    Introduction: Welcome to the Lyme Wars

    Chapter One: Borrelia burgdorferi, a Potent Emerging Disease

    Chapter Two: Considerations in the Natural Treatment of Lyme
    Borreliosis

    Chapter Three: The Core Protocol: Natural Healing of Lyme Borreliosis

    Chapter Four: The Expanded Protocol: An Herbal Repertory for Lyme Disease

    Chapter Five: Herbal Treatment of Lyme Coinfections

    Chapter Six: Prevention of Lyme and Initial Treatment after Tickbite

    Chapter Seven:~ The Lyme Protocol and Repertory Streamlined
    Resources


  2. Shirl

    Shirl New Member

    I don't have Lyme, but am always interested in a good book by a Herbalist. the author sounds very interesting.

    Tomorrow is my phone ordering day, will add the book to my list.


    Shalom, Shirl
  3. tansy

    tansy New Member

    on another message board. It's one that I would be very interested to read.

    The high dose long term ABX protocols are not having the predicted levels of success, many cannot tolerate them, or they would rather go for a more naturopathic protocol. Since I started researching treating chronic zoonotic infections I have learned we have many options open to us.

    The more we know about these and why they might help, the better able we are to help ourselves. Some herbs are more broad spectrum than their pharmaceutical counterparts, many have withstood the test of time.

    Tansy
    [This Message was Edited on 08/14/2005]
  4. neen85

    neen85 New Member

    tnhanks for posting all of the ordering info Victoria! Daneen
  5. dontlikeliver

    dontlikeliver New Member

    It was on Lymenet, and the person who had read it and posted about it also wrote that the author of the book states that herbs are not a substitute for antibiotics, but to be used together WITH antibiotics, helping to increase the effect of the antibiotics.

    A MINORITY of people cannot tolerate antibiotics and have true allergic reactions (swelling and body wide hives and breathing problems), but many others mistake herxing or side effects to allergies. So, as soon as they get a little uncomfortable they quit. (also rather than trying another or another combination) This is also due to doctors who are not experienced in these matters (LD). I used to be deathly afraid of them myself and avoided them as much as possible. I've had some very uncomfortable herxes, but I am MUCH improved now. But, when it comes to serious infections like Borreliosis and other TBD's, I tend to agree with the Lyme experts (I am not a doctor) - you need to treat it aggressively, at least at the start. (obviously we can all do what we want, but I hope that others who decide to avoid antibiotics to attempt to treat Lyme know what they may be in for).

    There are a number of people that I am aware of that have improved on other complimentary/alternative regimes, however, virtually ALL of them have done so AFTER TAKING COPIOUS amounts of antibiotics long-term FIRST, thus lowering their germ-load considerably beforehand.

    In most cases antibiotics DO have the best outcome for chronic Lyme, not the other way around, which I feel is what some people on this board are trying to proclaim because they have chosen to not use antibiotics for one reason or another.

    This really concerns me, because I think it is dangerous advice to advise or try to persuade people to avoid antibiotics when treating Lyme disease, when really they ARE necessary. (what other potentially fatal infection would you treat with herbs? Meningitis? Staph?) Lyme (Borreliosis) is not a virus btw. (I don't know if that is what the FFC advises patients, is it?). Can someone email me the FFC's contact details please? The moderators have my email, alternatively it can be found on Lymenet.

    By avoiding antibiotics for Lyme (Borreliosis) it is likely the infection will just do more and more damage deep down, while 'you' are just putting a band-aid on it and PERHAPS alleviating some of the symptoms on the surface temporarily.

    So, please, when discovering you have Lyme (Borreliosis), think before you put on the 'kid-gloves' about what you're dealing with here. In addition, it is important to see Lyme literate MD's when dealing with TBD's, because it's not only about Lyme disease, but most often about co-infections also. (Babesia, Bartonella, Erlichia, and of course, opportunistic infections sometimes). If you don't treat those co-infections BEFORE tackling the Lyme (Borreliosis) you will most likely not succeed in your treatment in the long-term.

    A good book to read is "All you need to know about Lyme Disease" by Karen Forschner-Vanderhoof as well as the contents of the ilads dot org website.

    My concern above is more to do with the US residents with Lyme, than the UK ones because I am well too aware that in the UK is is simply not possible to get the antibiotics 99% of the time on the National Health Service, unless you pay out of pocket, which some are not able to or willing to do. (perhaps out of principle as they feel their tax money should cover it, it should, but it does not at this point in time, usually). The VERY few (might be down to one) LLMD's in the UK are well too aware of this problem, and it is, I am sure, in part why so many of those patients are on 'herbal' (cheap) regimes, rather than expensive antibiotics. However, patients of the same LLMD may be on various regimes, some on Samento, Noni, etc and others on antibiotics, others on the Diflucan protocol, etc. It is very inconsistent and from talkign to patients I have found it is often up to the patient what they want to do and to then ask for that particular regime. (rather than the other way around).

    DLL

  6. victoria

    victoria New Member

    for me the important part of the review was this:

    "Healing Lyme... outlines the most potent herbal medicines and supplements that offer help - either alone or IN COMBINATION WITH ANTIBIOTICS (caps mine) -for preventing and healing the disease."

    I have TF on order for my son, but looking for more solid info on what else can help along with the abx...

    best,
    Victoria
  7. ANNXYZ

    ANNXYZ New Member

    anything that we can use along WITH abx to make a difference in the bacterial load is a blessing . Thanks !
  8. tansy

    tansy New Member

    and that is fine. We know there is a 29% success rate, and whilst that might seem low, it’s actually high in these DDs.

    As for your quotes about what others are writing on other message boards etc, here and on other topics at Immune Support, you’re reporting them in your way rather than as they were originally meant.

    Yes I agree the LLMD you quote uses a wide range of protocols, he is one of a growing number of MDs who is learning to treat the patient, in many cases he has had to take other non lyme disease factors into account. Again I agree some are using alternatives because they do not have the funds to finance high cost ABX, but many have had to stop taking ABx because they make them worse, others have for a wide variety of reasons opted to avoid ABx if they can. This LLMD does not use the term lyme disease; he refers to the borrelia-like forms he is finding as chronic borreliosis.

    Victoria has just quoted Stephen Harrod Buhner’s opinion; this is being reflected in the experiences of the wider patient community.

    Take care, Tansy

    PS You might like to make a comment on a topic here which features the NIH’s study on ABx protocols for lyme disease at
    http://www.immunesupport.com/chat/forums/message.cfm?id=616420&B=FM#616420
  9. dontlikeliver

    dontlikeliver New Member

    Hi Tansy,

    DLL Your personal preference is for ABx

    and that is fine. We know there is a 29% success rate, and whilst that might seem low, it’s actually high in these DDs.
    -------------------
    Can you clarify please, who is 'we' in the above? And, where are you (and them) getting this information? which as far as I can tell is not accurate. According to the Dr B and the like, it is 80% in a CHRONIC case (higher in acute if properly treated). And, out of the quite a few patients of his, and other patients on antibiotic protocols, I would agree with that as all of us have improved. Getting worse is usually part of the process - herxing - before improving. (apologies I do not know how to make bold text on here in order to make my responses stand out from the above).
    ---------------------------
    As for your quotes about what others are writing on other message boards etc, here and on other topics at Immune Support, you’re reporting them in your way rather than as they were originally meant.
    --------------------
    What do you mean? I am talking about this board specifically, not others and I can only 'report them' (i.e. respond) to what I am reading on a literal level. I am not against herbs and other alternatives. I use them myself. But, on their own, I think they are a recipe for failure. Especially, when other TBD's are not addressed.
    ----------------------------
    Yes I agree the LLMD you quote uses a wide range of protocols, he is one of a growing number of MDs who is learning to treat the patient, in many cases he has had to take other non lyme disease factors into account. Again I agree some are using alternatives because they do not have the funds to finance high cost ABX, but many have had to stop taking ABx because they make them worse, others have for a wide variety of reasons opted to avoid ABx if they can. This LLMD does not use the term lyme disease; he refers to the borrelia-like forms he is finding as chronic borreliosis.

    Yes, he is (by his own admission) learning as he has only really started focusing/dealing with this since 2003. And, I guess, in order to learn (unless you want to take a shortcut and learn from other peoples mistakes and use their tried and tested, or more so, protocols)then you must try lots of different things on lots of differentn people to see what makes them worse and what makes them better. BTW, it was AW who introduced me to the Dr B protocol, Harvey and the like - antibiotic protocols. I did not know of ILADS or any of that until AW pointed them out to me.

    Any good Lyme doc must and does take other infections/factors into account. AW is not unique in this, but doing as others also do. (which is great).

    He is using that term because he is not able to know what strains of Borrelia he is seeing and also because of the political climate (self-preservation). (If you are talking strictly about patients diagnosed with his Darkfield Microscopy). Lyme disease is also called Lyme Borreliosis, or Borreliosis. So, although the different strains may produce a slightly different picture of symptoms, they are pretty much the same, and also respond to the same treatment. The name really doesn't matter that much when it comes to how you're going to treat it.
    ---------------------------
    Victoria has just quoted Stephen Harrod Buhner’s opinion; this is being reflected in the experiences of the wider patient community.
    ---------------------------
    I'm sorry I've missed that (Victoria statement of above-mentioned persons opinion on something).
    We appear to move in similar circles in cyberspace, however, obviously have much differing opinions of 'wider patient community' and their experiences.
    ---------------------------

    Take care, Tansy
    ---------------------------

    PS You might like to make a comment on a topic here which features the NIH’s study on ABx protocols for lyme disease at
    http://www.immunesupport.com/chat/forums/message.cfm?id=616420&B=FM#616420

    The above link/article is by the anti-Lyme establishment, which OBVIOUSLY is going to say what this post says, i.e. that antibiotics, long-term are not helpful - in fact, they don't usually even believe that chronic Lyme exists (because essentially they call that CFS and FM or AIYH). I am surprised (not pleasantly) that someone on this forum would even post or highlight something written by them. It is akin to promoting an article/study by Simon Wessely in 'trying to help' others with M.E.

    Read: Two standards of care on the ilads dot org website and you'll see what I'm referring to. Here's a snippet from it:

    "The central difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease stem from the lack of sufficiently sensitive and reliable biological markers of the disease. Without such markers, it is difficult to determine who has the disease, the effectiveness of a course of treatment, and the end point of treatment. The ideal antibiotics, route of administration, and duration of treatment for persistent Lyme disease are not established. No single antibiotic or combination of antibiotics appears to be capable of completely eradicating the infection, and treatment failures or relapses are reported with all current regimens, although they are less common with early aggressive treatment.[1–3]

    Opinion within the medical community is deeply divided regarding the best approach for treating Lyme disease, particularly persistent Lyme disease that is not cured by short-term protocols. This split has resulted in two standards of care. Both viewpoints are reflected in peer-reviewed, evidence-based guidelines. Some physicians treat patients for 30 days only and assume that remaining symptoms reflect a self-perpetuating autoimmune response.[4] Other physicians assume that the persistent symptoms reflect on-going infection and gauge the duration of treatment by the patient's individual clinical response. These physicians believe that there is insufficient evidence at this point to adopt standardized treatment protocols.[5]

    While each viewpoint has a strong underlying hypothesis, the scientific evidence supporting either viewpoint is equivocal. Outcomes research is limited and conflicting. The NIAID has only funded three double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment outcome studies for long-term treatment of persistent Lyme disease. The findings of two studies (Klempner and Krupp) are contradictory, with one indicating that continued treatment is beneficial for treating fatigue and the other indicating that it is not.[6–8] The third NIAID-funded study has recently been completed and preliminary results support continued antibiotic treatment for patients with persistent Lyme disease.[9] The findings of five non-controlled studies support continued treatment.[1, 10–13] The existence of limited or conflicting controlled studies is not uncommon in the practice of medicine. Where this is the case, the unique clinical course of the patient, of necessity, bears the laboring oar in treatment decisions.

    Insurance companies have placed the full weight of their economic clout behind the less expensive short-term treatment protocols. More expensive longer-term treatment options are discredited as "experimental" or "not evidence-based." The point, of course, is that the science underlying both the short-term and the longer-term treatment options is equally uncertain (like prostate cancer). The appropriate response to equivocal research findings in healthcare outcomes is to fund more research. It is estimated that only 20% of medicine practiced today is rooted in double-blind studies.[14] The bulk of medicine today is practiced in the grey zone. Evidence-based medicine requires only that medicine be practiced in accordance with the evidence that currently exists, not that treatment be withheld pending research."

    http://ilads.org/insurance.html



    ----------------------------------

    Stormyskye

    DLL 08/15/05 12:11 PM

    You asked - "what other potentially fatal infection would you treat with herbs? Meningitis? Staph?"

    All of them, including cancer

    That is your choice, of course, but you'd likely end up worse, or worse - dead, especially if you already have a lowered immune system. Would you allow your child/mother/sister/brother/father to be denied antibiotics also in a serious bacterial illness if they were unable to chose for themselves?

    If you've ever been critically ill and life saved by antibiotics, following trying to 'cure' the mysterious and increasingly debilitating (resulting in critical) illness with herbs and vitamins, you'll know where I'm coming from. I have.

    DLL



    [This Message was Edited on 08/15/2005]
    [This Message was Edited on 08/15/2005]
    [This Message was Edited on 08/15/2005]
  10. dontlikeliver

    dontlikeliver New Member

    Don't get me wrong.

    It is not like I believe that herbs don't work for anything. I used to take feverfew tincture for migraines for some time, and it did work. (although after some months it would not work anymore for me). I have, and do, also use other herbs. But, not without antibiotics.

    I just don't believe that it is enough, on it's own, for a deep and serious infection such as Borreliosis. I have watched others go down that road for their own Borreliosis, only to end up 'defeated' and THEN 'succumb' to the antibiotics (having wasted time, money and a decline in health in the meantime).