new stimulant

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by NIELK, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. NIELK

    NIELK Member

    I have just been subscribed phendimetrazine (bontril) by my dr. It's supposed to act as a stimulant. I am on many other meds for my cfs & depression but I am still so tired & achy that I cannot work. Does anyone have any experience with this drug?

    Thanks,
    Nielk
  2. dunnlb

    dunnlb New Member

    Have you tried Provigil? It is not addictive. It gives you a little lift without causing insomnia at night.

    Also, Cymbalta has really helped my aches and pains.
  3. springrose22

    springrose22 New Member

    They will make you feel worse. Marie
  4. NIELK

    NIELK Member

    is provigil a stimulant? if not, what's the difference?
    is anyone with cfs on stimulants and feeling better?
  5. elsa

    elsa New Member


    Not all amphetamine or amphet.like medications are the kiss of death. I think a balanced supply of information is needed here.

    I so would like people to think before they use the words addiction and addictive.

    There are many medications on this board that could be thrown into that category when not given enough thought on the matter first.

    I have posted on the topic before. The statistical chance of a chronic illness patient becoming "addicted" to their medications is 0.03% ... that is three hundredths of one percent!

    The addict takes his drug to get high, feel euphoric and to absolutly avoid life.The patient takes his drug to GET ON WITH LIFE. The difference between the two in that statement has always amazed me.

    The "drug wars" started in the late 80's have really made life difficult for some people ... either they are afraid to try something out of fear or they are looked upon poorly due to misguided information.

    Is amphetamine addictive. You bet. Will you be taking this stimulant drug to avoid life or to be an active participant? Do you need it for health reasons and quality of life or because the buzz would be better then the day in / day out existance of your life?

    Big difference in those two questions.

    What I would like to see is a fair look at stimulant medications for excessive daytime sleepiness. There are some heavy hitter pain medications on this board too.

    Street people would love to get their hands on them. So, why is there a level of acceptance for opiates and not for other drugs that treat the same illness?

    Dependence = physiological response of the body to long term use to a drug.

    Tolerance = Is a need for increasingly larger doses to achieve the same level of effectiveness. It is called a Physiological Phenomenon and it has not proven to be a prevelent limitation to long term medication use.

    I've already made mention of addiction and how we chronically ill people have a very small risk of becoming addicted.

    One last point before I get off my box ... There is a hugh number of fibromyalgic / chronic fatigue patients that are on anti-depressants as part of their treatment and maintainance plan. Anti-depressants cause physical dependence and in some cases tolerance.

    No one will stop taking their AD's suddenly without experiencing withdrawal symptoms ... yet AD's are not warned agaist use as near as strongly as stimulant medications taken for the same treatment / maintainance plan. I'm asking for a fair shake on these typs of rx'es for our illness.

    I take provigl ... have for a long time. I have taken steps to avoid dependence or the need for increasingly large doses. I also have adderall which is amphetamine.

    I obviously do not take them on the same day ... alternate every few days when I take a stimulant drug at all ... this is so I will not grow used to either one and lose their benefit for EDS.

    Bontril is a central nervous system stimulant and related to amphetamine in it's structure, but is not classified as amphetamine. Can cause physical dependence and can cause withdrawal symptoms if stopped suddenly after several week's use. This is not unexpected ... like many of our rx'es, this medication needs to be tapered off slowly ... not unlike AD's.

    I hope this helps in your decision. Quality of life is very important in considering our treatments for a chronic illness with no cure. Read eveything you can so you can make an informed decision and then, if you're comfortable, try it ... see if it works for you.

    Take care,

    Elsa


    [This Message was Edited on 11/21/2005]
  6. Rosiebud

    Rosiebud New Member

    that acts as a stimulant. Your body has to come down at some point and I would be afraid this would cause a huge relapse.

    Just my opinion, but I would stay away from that.

    love
    Rosie
  7. NIELK

    NIELK Member

    thanks elsa for all the info. you seem very knowledgable.
    are you in the medical field?
  8. elsa

    elsa New Member



    Medical Field? Only in a peripheral manner. I like "knowin', not doin'" .... I teach health and safety teams with large companies and corporations how to recognize and deal with life threatening illnesses and injuries from basic and professional rescuer to a first responder. My name's on some list to call in case catastrophy hits the area, but I'm hopeful it's on the bottom of the list!

    My husband works in the admin. side of hospitals and physician's groups and I am a licensed health/life agent. Sooo, we have some insights into healthcare but we are not medical professionals in the sense that you mean.

    I like learning and knowing ... when I started feeling the way we all do w/ these illnesses ... I started the research. I have stacks and stacks of research information on the systems affected by CFS/FM. I find it all very interesting ... I'll start off searching for one specific bit of info and land gosh knows where ... learning every step of the way.

    I would probably drive some nuts! I have had a couple of healthcare providers get miffed at my knowledge ... They don't always like it when we don't follow blindly like little sheep! LOL

    The majority of my MD's, ND's appreciate a partner approach and respect vs resent my collection of information.

    Heck, I was the one to bring in the info on CFS and said I think I have this. My doc (who I am thankful for) said probably, let's find out ... and off we went.

    I wish you well on your excesive daytime sleepiness trek. I have not taken bontril, but as you know, I do take medication for EDS. I have a documented sleep disorder ... like many of us. Unfortunately, the natural approach ie 5-HTP and others cause my sleep disorder to become worse.

    Lunesta at night has made my situation much better. That, combined with other things has made my need for EDS medication less and less. I still take it however. I want to be a part of my life, not watching it go past me.

    Like many other rx'es for us, I don't seem to require as large a dose of adderall as many adults with ADHA who take add. do. It does help with brain fog as well as keeping me awake.

    Dr.Charles Lapp in Carolina theorized that adderall, being an ADHD medication might serve a duel purpose for his CFS/FM patients.... Not only battle EDS but help also to focus and clear the fog a bit.

    I have found with myself that his theory is true. Provigil does indeed help keep me awake when otherwise I would be doing face plants at unreasonable times. Adderall however helps me to focus on the task at hand as well as EDS.

    This was probably way more information then you wanted ... LOL, If so, I apologize for that. I do wish you well. Keep me posted on what direction you decide to take and how you are feeling.

    Take care,

    Elsa
  9. NIELK

    NIELK Member

    elsa,

    currently, I'm on Klonopin, neurontin, zoloft, phenobarbitol. I started last week phendimetrazine, but very low amount at first. My doctor always introduces new meds very slowly (like an 8th of a pill) & then slowly increases. So right now I'm on 3/4 of a pill in the morning. So far it's not doing much. I think I do feel a litle bit of energy of a couple of hours. I guess I have to wait till I reach the full dosage to see if it really works.
    I really hate being on so many meds, but I cannot function without them.
    Thanks for your help.
  10. 69mach1

    69mach1 New Member

    concerta for the same reasons as you...except i am not on any antidepressants at the moment...i have not been having any luck w/them..allergies ect...

    so my pychiatrist is having me start concerta er, for hopefully to give me some energy and stay more focused and lift some brain fog.

    i am not taking anything for pain on a rgular basis right at this moment...i have been fighitng it ...i don't know how i am supposed to take the opiods and drive my son to and from's and function like a human being...plus i have the luck for drug allergies the kind you end up in the e.r. type...

    research your new med online and play trial by error...that i s what i have to do..


    good luck,,
    jodie
  11. NIELK

    NIELK Member

    thank you Jodie,

    good luck with the concerta for you. I also have difficulty with driving. My reaction time is very slow & I'm a little spaced out. So, I try to drive very slowly & deliberately with much concentration.

    good luck,

    Nielk
  12. elsa

    elsa New Member



    Was Tramadol one of the pain medications you are allergic to? I find that it has controlled my pain pretty well and it gives me a tiny lift. I also combine it with ibuprofen ... takes care of things for me and I don't worry about being in a drug haze. Maybe it will work for you.

    Good luck on concerta ... I hope it works for you. The excessive daytime sleepiness is the most aggrevating symptom for me.

    Elsa
  13. Braingonebad

    Braingonebad New Member

    Nielk - I always ask my board buddies if they've tried a med, too, before I try it. Nothing like word-of-mouth.

    But also, it's good to have all the written info about the med - from as many sources as possible.

    I found this on one site, hope it helps. Elsa, as usual, gave you some great advice. Mine would be to read through this and the paper you get with the med when you fill it at the pharmacy.

    If you read this and decide against taking it though, provigil and amantadine are non-amphetamine, non-stimulants. They work on the nervous system, and that's all I understand about them. I take provigil, which is a narcolepsy drug, and it works for me. Good luck, and let us know how you work this out!


    What is the most important information I should know about phendimetrazine?
    • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phendimetrazine may cause dizziness, blurred vision, or restlessness, and it may hide the symptoms of extreme tiredness. If you experience these effects, avoid hazardous activities.
    • Phendimetrazine is habit forming. You can become physically and psychologically dependent on this medication, and withdrawal effects may occur if you stop taking it suddenly after several weeks of continuous use. Talk to your doctor about stopping this medication gradually.
    • Do not crush, chew, or open any "once-daily" phendimetrazine tablets or capsules. Swallow them whole.




    What is phendimetrazine?
    • Phendimetrazine is a sympathomimetic amine, which is similar to an amphetamine. It is also known as an "anorectic" or "anorexigenic" drug. Phendimetrazine stimulates the central nervous system (nerves and brain), which increases your heart rate and blood pressure and decreases your appetite.
    • Phendimetrazine is used as a short-term supplement to diet and exercise in the treatment of obesity.
    • Phendimetrazine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.




    Who should not take phendimetrazine?
    • You cannot take phendimetrazine if you
    · have heart disease or high blood pressure;
    · have arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries);
    · have glaucoma;
    · have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), tranylcypromine (Parnate), or phenelzine (Nardil) in the last 14 days; or
    · have a history of drug or alcohol abuse.
    • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have
    · problems with your thyroid,
    · an anxiety disorder,
    · epilepsy or another seizure disorder, or
    · diabetes.
    • You may not be able to take phendimetrazine, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.
    • It is not known whether phendimetrazine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take phendimetrazine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.
    • It is also not known whether phendimetrazine passes into breast milk. Do not take phendimetrazine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.




    How should I take phendimetrazine?
    • Take phendimetrazine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.
    • Take each dose with a full glass of water.
    • Phendimetrazine is usually taken once a day (sustained release formula) or two to three times daily (immediate-release formula) before meals on an empty stomach.
    • Do not take phendimetrazine in the evening because it may cause insomnia.
    • Do not crush, chew, or open any "once-daily" phendimetrazine tablets or capsules. Swallow them whole.
    • Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. Too much phendimetrazine could be very dangerous to your health.
    • Store phendimetrazine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.




    What happens if I miss a dose?
    • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose or if it is already evening, skip the missed dose and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. A dose taken too late in the day will cause insomnia. Do not take a double dose of this medication.




    What happens if I overdose?
    • Seek emergency medical attention.
    • Symptoms of a phendimetrazine overdose include restlessness, tremor, rapid breathing, confusion, hallucinations, panic, aggressiveness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, an irregular heartbeat, and seizures.




    What should I avoid while taking phendimetrazine?
    • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Phendimetrazine may cause dizziness, blurred vision, or restlessness, and it may hide the symptoms of extreme tiredness. If you experience these effects, avoid hazardous activities.
    • Do not take phendimetrazine late in the day. A dose taken too late in the day can cause insomnia.




    What are the possible side effects of phendimetrazine?
    • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking phendimetrazine and seek emergency medical attention:
    · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);
    · an irregular heartbeat or very high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); or
    · hallucinations, abnormal behavior, or confusion.
    • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take phendimetrazine and talk to your doctor if you experience
    · restlessness or tremor,
    · nervousness or anxiety,
    · headache or dizziness,
    · insomnia,
    · dry mouth or an unpleasant taste in your mouth,
    · diarrhea or constipation, or
    · impotence or changes in your sex drive.
    • Phendimetrazine is habit forming. You can become physically and psychologically dependent on this medication, and withdrawal effects may occur if you stop taking it suddenly after several weeks of continuous use. Talk to your doctor about stopping this medication gradually.
    • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.




    What other drugs will affect phendimetrazine?
    • You cannot take phendimetrazine if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), tranylcypromine (Parnate), or phenelzine (Nardil) in the last 14 days.
    • Changes in insulin and other diabetes drug therapies may be necessary during treatment with phendimetrazine.
    • Phendimetrazine may reduce the effects of guanethidine (Ismelin). This could lead to an increase in blood pressure. Tell your doctor if you are taking guanethidine.
    • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine (Asendin), doxepin (Sinequan), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil), clomipramine (Anafranil), protriptyline (Vivactil), or desipramine (Norpramin). These drugs may decrease the effects of phendimetrazine.
    • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with phendimetrazine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.