No, you are NOT imagining it, and now there is Proof!

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by ssMarilyn, Dec 8, 2002.

  1. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I got this article from MORE magazine this month:

    For millions of Americans with Fibromyalgia, the constant pain and overwhelming fatigue are often accompanied by the suspicions of loved ones-and even doctors-who believe that the real problem is hypochondria. But now there's strong evidence that fibromyalgia is, in fact, a genuine, neurobiological condition.

    Daniel J. Clauw, M.D., and his colleagues at Georgetown University, used a device to apply pressure to the thumbnails of 16 fm patients and 16 healthy volunteers., while a brain scan revealed what was happening internally. Just a gentle squeeze caused moderate pain for for the fm patients; to get the same "ouch" from the healthy volunteers, researchers had to double the pressure.

    The brain scans showed that fibromyalgia sufferers weren't simply complaining more: With mild pressure, all the areas known to be involved in the pain processing lit up, and looked similar to the patterns in healthy people getting the doubly hard blow. This suggests that fibromyalgia may be the result of a central nervous system malfunction that turns up the volume of nerve impulses caused by pressure.

    Although there aren't any specific implications for treatment, and the actual test is too costly-and results too preliminary-to be used for routine diagnostic purposes, the findings may make it easier for doctors to recognize affected patients. Says Clauw, "Ultimately, what we found is that they are telling the truth."

    I always wondered why the heck I couldn't even stand to have my toy poodle walk across my lower legs in bed without me crying out, and I can't have my teeth cleaned without being numbed up, and my hubby doesn't need anything.

    At least now we have something to show our unbelieving relatives. I, for one, am showing this to my doubtful sisters.

    Marilyn :)
  2. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I got this article from MORE magazine this month:

    For millions of Americans with Fibromyalgia, the constant pain and overwhelming fatigue are often accompanied by the suspicions of loved ones-and even doctors-who believe that the real problem is hypochondria. But now there's strong evidence that fibromyalgia is, in fact, a genuine, neurobiological condition.

    Daniel J. Clauw, M.D., and his colleagues at Georgetown University, used a device to apply pressure to the thumbnails of 16 fm patients and 16 healthy volunteers., while a brain scan revealed what was happening internally. Just a gentle squeeze caused moderate pain for for the fm patients; to get the same "ouch" from the healthy volunteers, researchers had to double the pressure.

    The brain scans showed that fibromyalgia sufferers weren't simply complaining more: With mild pressure, all the areas known to be involved in the pain processing lit up, and looked similar to the patterns in healthy people getting the doubly hard blow. This suggests that fibromyalgia may be the result of a central nervous system malfunction that turns up the volume of nerve impulses caused by pressure.

    Although there aren't any specific implications for treatment, and the actual test is too costly-and results too preliminary-to be used for routine diagnostic purposes, the findings may make it easier for doctors to recognize affected patients. Says Clauw, "Ultimately, what we found is that they are telling the truth."

    I always wondered why the heck I couldn't even stand to have my toy poodle walk across my lower legs in bed without me crying out, and I can't have my teeth cleaned without being numbed up, and my hubby doesn't need anything.

    At least now we have something to show our unbelieving relatives. I, for one, am showing this to my doubtful sisters.

    Marilyn :)
  3. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    We are finally getting the long-overdue validation for our pain. We suffer from what docs call "pain amplification." The normal message of pain in our brains is multiplied many times over.

    I have found that even though in general, I have a high pain tolerance, certain things are just too painful for me. I believe this is related to our sensory overload.

    Thanks again.

    Love, Mikie
  4. pam_d

    pam_d New Member

    Thanks for the article!

    I agree with Mikie; I seem to have a pretty high pain tolerance in some areas, yet almost no tolerance for certain kinds of pain, and very little tolerance for discomfort in terms of these weird FM neuro. sensations.

    I'm just glad the research goes on...albiet slowly...so that we, as well as others, may someday understand this thing better.

    Hugs,
    Pam
  5. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I just got to thinking that I have pretty good pain tolerance for "internal" pain, but have very little tolerance for "external" pain. Don't you even THINK about touching my legs! The pain is incredible and it starts out so small it's barely noticeable and it comes on like a wave to where it hurts really bad. I've had this for years, but it's gotten worse over the past year or so. I wonder if the external pain sensors are wired differently than the internal sensors?

    Marilyn :)