OT: Gross! WHAT Happens When You Flush? Tell Your Men This!!!

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by JLH, Feb 15, 2006.

  1. JLH

    JLH New Member

    Gross! WHAT Happens When You Flush?

    If this doesn't make you buy a new toothbrush, nothing will. If you flush the toilet without first closing the lid, germy droplets of bacteria from the toilet are released into the air and will likely land on your toothbrush--and just about everything else in the bathroom.

    "The water aerosolizes 20 feet from the center of the flush," Dr. Philip M. Tierno, author of "The Secret Life of Germs" and a professor at New York University Medical Center told Albany, New York's Capital News 9 TV. He advises shutting the lid before you flush and rinsing your toothbrush with mouthwash or peroxide every single day. Or just store it in the medicine cabinet.

    Another college professor who studies germs up close and personal is Dr. Charles Gerba, an environmental microbiologist from the University of Arizona. Lest you think Tierno is exaggerating, he's not. Gerba told the Arizona Alumnus magazine that if you look at close-up photos of the "germy ejecta" that are spewed in the air from a toilet flush, they "look like Baghdad at night during a U.S. air attack."

    But your bathroom isn't the dirtiest room in the house. Your kitchen gets that award. Tierno insists your kitchen sponge or dishrag is filled with far more bacteria than the toilet bowl or garbage can. How can that be? "It's worse than the bathroom 'cause here's where you have all your road kill, you have chickens, steaks," he told Capital News 9.

    A new study sponsored by Brillo puts it in perspective: Almost half the people questioned admitted they use the same sponge to wipe the cutting board, the counters, and the dishes. Tierno advises changing the sponge every week or two and disinfecting it every day in a solution of one ounce of bleach mixed with a quart of water. You can also clean it in the dishwasher or microwave it (make sure it's wet) for one minute on high.

    What's in that sponge? Read on if you dare. Gerba says it's fecal coliform bacteria from raw meat. The warm, damp sponge is a perfect breeding ground. Just think what happens when you wipe down your countertops with that sponge! Of 15 household items that Gerba analyzed for bacteria, the kitchen sponge was No. 1, followed by the kitchen sink, the bathroom sink, and the kitchen faucet handle. The toilet was last on this list. He quipped to the Alumnus, "If an alien came from space and studied the bacterial counts, he probably would conclude he should wash his hands in your toilet and crap in your sink."

    What can you do? Gerba advises cleaning kitchen and bathroom sinks and drains every day with a cleanser that contains chlorine bleach, which will kill 99.9 percent of fecal organisms. Do the same to countertops, appliances, and faucet handles two to three times a week, and hit the toilets, tubs, and showers weekly.

    If this doesn't make you buy a new toothbrush, nothing will. If you flush the toilet without first closing the lid, germy droplets of bacteria from the toilet are released into the air and will likely land on your toothbrush--and just about everything else in the bathroom.

    "The water aerosolizes 20 feet from the center of the flush," Dr. Philip M. Tierno, author of "The Secret Life of Germs" and a professor at New York University Medical Center told Albany, New York's Capital News 9 TV. He advises shutting the lid before you flush and rinsing your toothbrush with mouthwash or peroxide every single day. Or just store it in the medicine cabinet.

    Another college professor who studies germs up close and personal is Dr. Charles Gerba, an environmental microbiologist from the University of Arizona. Lest you think Tierno is exaggerating, he's not. Gerba told the Arizona Alumnus magazine that if you look at close-up photos of the "germy ejecta" that are spewed in the air from a toilet flush, they "look like Baghdad at night during a U.S. air attack."

    But ......
    your bathroom isn't the dirtiest room in the house. Your kitchen gets that award. Tierno insists your kitchen sponge or dishrag is filled with far more bacteria than the toilet bowl or garbage can. How can that be? "It's worse than the bathroom 'cause here's where you have all your road kill, you have chickens, steaks," he told Capital News 9.

    A new study sponsored by Brillo puts it in perspective: Almost half the people questioned admitted they use the same sponge to wipe the cutting board, the counters, and the dishes. Tierno advises changing the sponge every week or two and disinfecting it every day in a solution of one ounce of bleach mixed with a quart of water. You can also clean it in the dishwasher or microwave it (make sure it's wet) for one minute on high.

    What's in that sponge? Read on if you dare. Gerba says it's fecal coliform bacteria from raw meat. The warm, damp sponge is a perfect breeding ground. Just think what happens when you wipe down your countertops with that sponge! Of 15 household items that Gerba analyzed for bacteria, the kitchen sponge was No. 1, followed by the kitchen sink, the bathroom sink, and the kitchen faucet handle. The toilet was last on this list. He quipped to the Alumnus, "If an alien came from space and studied the bacterial counts, he probably would conclude he should wash his hands in your toilet and crap in your sink."

    What can you do? Gerba advises cleaning kitchen and bathroom sinks and drains every day with a cleanser that contains chlorine bleach, which will kill 99.9 percent of fecal organisms. Do the same to countertops, appliances, and faucet handles two to three times a week, and hit the toilets, tubs, and showers weekly.
  2. bettydroop

    bettydroop New Member

    Just another thing to make me feel like I am not doing what I should. Cleaning / sterilizing three times a week ?? EEEEKKK! I have NOOOOOOOO energy to do anything like that! And I HATE germs! Yikes.

    I always wonder about people who have NO running water, what do they do??

    This is a bit of info I really didnt want to be reminded of.

    Oh well, one day at a time.



  3. ellikers

    ellikers New Member

    I keep my toothbrush in a drawer in the bathroom that is usually shut so this doesn't worry me too much.

    If we just wipe surfaces down when we can (energy permitting) and keep things put away I think we'll be okay. :)
  4. Jeanne-in-Canada

    Jeanne-in-Canada New Member

    I prefer a dish rag because it picks up food particle when wiping down the stove and counters much better. Then I can shake them off in garbage, rinse and really clean surfaces. I change mine every few days. Snonges always did seem germier to me, they are so porous and they stink quickly, even if you soap then alot.


    Jeanne
  5. ilovecats94

    ilovecats94 New Member

    What I heard was 6 feet in the air. Man, I'll never remember to shut the lid on the toilet. I'll try though.

    I have a wall between my sinks and toilet, so the flush would have to go sideways and then backwards to reach our toothbrushes.

    This is something I need to let Matt know as his toilet is right beside his sink and cabinet. We don't have any medicine cabinets in the house. No drawers in the bathrooms either, just the cabinets under the sinks.

    When my cleaning girl comes I put my toothbrush away in the linen closet until she finishes. My husband puts his toothbrush away too.

    Well this will be yet another trick for me to learn. lol This makes a lot of sense though.

    Hugs,
    Faye
  6. JLH

    JLH New Member

    I always close the lid on the toilet--I think it's disgusting to look at an open toliet, but I haven't been able to convince my husband to put the seat down--let alone the lid!!

    I've heard about all these germs and the sponges before, too. I never did use a sponge in the kitchen. I use a dish rag, too.

    At the end of my kitchen cleanup every evening, I always take the dirty dish rag and dish towel and throw them both in my dirty towel basket and start over the next day with a clean, fresh one of each.

    It's hard to stay germ-free when you're healthy, let alone sick!!

    Janet

  7. kjfms

    kjfms Member

    ...Coliform is everywhere and I mean everywhere it in your house, car, stores, streams, rivers...just about anywhere you can think of.

    Fecal coliform bacteria are passed through the fecal excrement of humans, livestock and wildlife.

    I did Fecal Coliform analyses on water when I worked in the coal industry.

    Great article,

    Karen
  8. Casamadre5

    Casamadre5 Member

    This has circulated a couple times over the years....check out snopes.com. This is another myth. You can keep your sponges/dish clothes germ free by microwaving between washings.
    [This Message was Edited on 02/15/2006]
  9. elastigirl

    elastigirl New Member

    I was so paranoid about germs in the kitchen, I bought a 12pk of small utility cloths and use a clean one everyday.

    Thankfully, we don't prepare meat.

    I had no idea about the toilet flushing thing! Our toothbrushes are in the farthest opposite corner of the bathroom, but I never thought twice about making sure my son closes the lids when he flushes.

    Just think of public bathrooms! Unless the flush is automatic, you must lean over the (unlidded) toilet to flush! Sploosh! Germs in za face!
  10. Cromwell

    Cromwell New Member

    to use out of the house as imagine all those germs that get onto the bit you are about to grab hold of.

    JUst heard a report that Supermarket Cart handles are the most germ laden of all things. Some stores supply clorox wipes by the storage area, but never even think of eatign when leaving the store!!!

    Also, one day there were three little kids crammed into a cart, all with runny noses and leaky diapers and I thought, someone is about to put food in there after they leave!!

    Yet another reason I shop at my little natural foods store.

    My mom always had us stand our brushes in hydrogen peroxide and water.

    LOve Anne C
  11. MamaR

    MamaR New Member

    I have heard of this before.....Oprah...I think.

    I close the lid...not sure if hubby does.

    Our master bathroom is pretty large. The toilet is really far from sink area.

    But, the second isn't....so will remind my guests......if I ever have any anymore!

    About the kitchen...well, I don't use a sponge. I wash my dish cloths REALLY regularly....and I use antibacterial soap also.

    It really makes you think to read this!!

    Thanks...JLH
  12. JLH

    JLH New Member

    Both of my bathrooms are small -- not a whole lot of room between the sick vanity and the toilet.

    I have flushed it before with the lid up and felt the water splash on the back of my legs. Yuck!!!!! Then I'd have to was off my legs--so I started closing the lid before I read this!

    Janet
  13. The television show MYTHBUSTERS, on the discovery channel, where the two men, (I believe they are brothers, as well as ? scientists, of sorts, if you will, /researchers...of their own sort, anyhow.)did this on t.v. & proved it to be true.

    Their sole purpose* is to basically, pick out* the most common "urban legends" and "myths" and prove, or disprove them, by the best way, which is to try them out themselves. And, sometimes they will even come up with their own, extreme epxeriments, it is very interesting to watch them sometimes.

    Anyways, about 2 or 3 years ago, on their show, they did this experiment, with the toothbrushes at a distance of about 8 feet I believe was what they chose, but, they did not use just one or two toothbrushes, they used many, and put them all around the bathroom, and I think it may have been ?? at a frat house? possibly for a few weeks? maybe (not sure where they chose to leave the brushes for a few weeks,) then took them down, and then tested each one, the one(s) closest to the toilet, then farther away, and farther, then the one closest to the door..

    All of them, were completely spattered with fecal (ICCKK!!) bacteria(s) etc... but of course, the ones closest had the most, but not a single one was missed...

    They used, a blacklight, I think it was a regular old blacklight, and turned off the lights, to show this bacteria, I think they probably sprayed something on the toothbrushes, to make them blacklight responsive... but, they did indeed, "look like baghdad at night, during a U.S. air attack" as Dr. Charles Garba had said in the article you posted for us, jlh,

    Hubby always uses a new dishcloth each day, or the dishwasher,---but---even *with* our medicine cabinet...LOL seeing this 'reminder'..and our tiny bathroom, makes me want to move all that much more! LOL! YUCK!


    (((((HUGS)))))


    Laura, aka AintAsGoodAsIOnceWas
    [This Message was Edited on 02/17/2006]
  14. Sue50

    Sue50 New Member

    I used to keep mine in a pretty holder on the bathroom counter until one day I caught the cat sucking on one of the toothbrushes!!!! since then I have put them in the drawer.
  15. Adl123

    Adl123 New Member

    Hi,
    Thanks for posting this. I first heard of the bacteria spray a few years ago. Since then I have kept the toilet lid closed and my toothbrush in the medicine cabinet. I think that is one factor responsible for the reduction in the number of colds I've caught.

    Terry
  16. JLH

    JLH New Member

    is true, I know, because my husband used to be a Sanitarian, or Health Inspector.

    We our children were babies, they would ocassionally pick up a CLEAN dishtowel out of the laundry basket when I was folding them and they would start chewing on it. He would take it away from them and I would get "the story" on how many bacteria were STILL on that towel even though it had just been washed and dried in a hot dryer!!!

    Of course, I would always come back with that story on how you are supposed to eat a ton of dirt before you die anyway!

    But if a clean dishtowel still has so many bacteria still in it, how could you ever use a kitchen wash rag more than one day!?! You have used it to wash your dishes, wipe off a greasy stovetop, dirty countertops with food particles trapped in it, then just rinse it off with water, let it sit overnight for the bacteria to multiply, etc.

    What is the big deal of throwing all kitchen washrags and handtowels in the dirty towel basket at night and starting with clean ones the next day? Much safer for the family! I don't know, but my mother keeps the same dish rag around in her sick for days!! YUCK!!!! That drives my husband crazy ... and he hates to eat anything that she cooks--he's afraid that her hands are not properly washed while cooking--you know, after handling raw meat, etc.

    Another thing ... when we DO eat out, with is not often, and we eat in, when we are finished, we are not permitted by my hubby to clear off our tables and throw the trash in the recepticals and put the trays on top. He says if we leave it on the table, it FORCES an employee to clean the table off, and "hopefully" wiping off the table with a dirty rag!!!!! From inspecting restaurants, he says the standard of cleanliness in the dining rooms are far under par. When we eat out, he also inspects the silverware to insure it is clean, etc. He has been know to ask an employee to clean a table again before we sit down to eat if he thinks it looks dirty.

    Our children when they were teenagers were often embarassed when we all went out to eat because of stuff like that! Often, he would try to discourage them from using the restrooms in the restaurants ... and ESPECIALLY in gas stations!!!

    It's not easy to prepare meals in a kitchen at home when you live with a professional health professional!!! (He is now the administrator of the same health dept. where he was the Health Inspector!)

    This is why I have to always cook at home,
    Janet
  17. lease79

    lease79 New Member

    Extremely grateful that my toilet & bathroom are two seperate rooms. I couldn't imagine having my toilet in the bathroom :x
  18. nancyneptune

    nancyneptune New Member

    Just 2 weeks ago they did an extensive test of this on Exploding Myths on the Discovery channe. You know those two guys who like to blow things up and what not.

    They had toothbrushes all lined up along a pipe on the bathroom wal and practically showered the bathroom with the toilet mist business.

    They did it 3 different ways, no sale. it's a myth.
    There was no extensive bacteria on the toothbrushes other than the ones from your mouth when you brush.
  19. Sandyz

    Sandyz New Member

    That is so disgusting, I`ll never look at my bathroom the same. From now on the toilet lid is down when you we flush.
  20. bettydroop

    bettydroop New Member

    HEY! Thats interesting! It sounds like the discovery channel has now done two different "tests/ stories" on this same subject and now I wonder which one is TRUE.

    Its sounds so awful.
    I wonder though if we want to really analyze this to pieces... I wonder if you DO put the lid down and flush EVERY time...when one opens the lid next time and you were to accidently contact that lid, wouldnt you have billions and billions of gross- icky- doody -yuck on there? I would have to have a "haz mat suit" to touch that lid and put it down BEFORE I flush again! ARRRGGG. All those germs would be concentrated now, on that lid. What to do. What to do.Does anyone know what I mean? Corect me if I am wrong.
    Is this the million dollar question now? To put the lid down... or not to put the lid down... you decide- bum bum bummmm.