Pharmacists get prescribing powers

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by allhart, Nov 24, 2002.

  1. allhart

    allhart New Member

    i got this from someone eles and wanted to share it i had heard nothing about it,
    this may help many of use in the future



    Pharmacists get prescribing powers


    Pharmacists will prescribe a limited range of drugs

    New powers allowing pharmacists and nurses to prescribe drugs from early next year have been finalised.
    The move should allow patients with asthma, diabetes, coronary heart disease and high blood pressure quicker access to medicines.

    Under the scheme, after diagnosis, patients will no longer need to re-visit their doctors for prescriptions.



    This development means that pharmacists will make fuller use of their five years training and expert knowledge in medicines

    Marshall Davies
    Instead, patients would be able to get medicines prescribed by a pharmacist or nurse, with agreement from a doctor.

    Staff will undergo comprehensive training before becoming 'supplementary' prescribers.

    The aim is to have up to 1,000 pharmacists and up to 10,000 nurses trained by the end of 2004.

    Training for pharmacists will begin in the spring, and new courses for nurse prescribing will be available from early in the new year.

    Health Minister Lord Philip Hunt said: "This move has real potential to provide better and quicker patient care, and to make much better use of highly skilled pharmacists and nurses, by giving them delegated powers to prescribe drugs to patients in partnership with GPs or hospital doctors."

    Pharmacists pleased

    Marshall Davies, president of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, said: "Our profession welcomes supplementary prescribing.



    The current antiquated arrangements are insulting to the many highly trained nurses

    Professor David Haslam
    "The ability to prescribe will allow pharmacists to take a more active role in delivering care to the benefit of patients.

    "This development means that pharmacists will make fuller use of their five years training and expert knowledge in medicines."

    Sarah Mullally, Chief Nursing Officer for England said: "This type of prescribing will be a very useful addition to the practice of nurses, many of whom already manage a variety of long term conditions and health needs for their patients.

    "Nurses often advise doctors on prescribing decisions in their specialist area, and the introduction of supplementary prescribing will allow nurses to write many of those prescriptions themselves.
  2. allhart

    allhart New Member

    i got this from someone eles and wanted to share it i had heard nothing about it,
    this may help many of use in the future



    Pharmacists get prescribing powers


    Pharmacists will prescribe a limited range of drugs

    New powers allowing pharmacists and nurses to prescribe drugs from early next year have been finalised.
    The move should allow patients with asthma, diabetes, coronary heart disease and high blood pressure quicker access to medicines.

    Under the scheme, after diagnosis, patients will no longer need to re-visit their doctors for prescriptions.



    This development means that pharmacists will make fuller use of their five years training and expert knowledge in medicines

    Marshall Davies
    Instead, patients would be able to get medicines prescribed by a pharmacist or nurse, with agreement from a doctor.

    Staff will undergo comprehensive training before becoming 'supplementary' prescribers.

    The aim is to have up to 1,000 pharmacists and up to 10,000 nurses trained by the end of 2004.

    Training for pharmacists will begin in the spring, and new courses for nurse prescribing will be available from early in the new year.

    Health Minister Lord Philip Hunt said: "This move has real potential to provide better and quicker patient care, and to make much better use of highly skilled pharmacists and nurses, by giving them delegated powers to prescribe drugs to patients in partnership with GPs or hospital doctors."

    Pharmacists pleased

    Marshall Davies, president of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, said: "Our profession welcomes supplementary prescribing.



    The current antiquated arrangements are insulting to the many highly trained nurses

    Professor David Haslam
    "The ability to prescribe will allow pharmacists to take a more active role in delivering care to the benefit of patients.

    "This development means that pharmacists will make fuller use of their five years training and expert knowledge in medicines."

    Sarah Mullally, Chief Nursing Officer for England said: "This type of prescribing will be a very useful addition to the practice of nurses, many of whom already manage a variety of long term conditions and health needs for their patients.

    "Nurses often advise doctors on prescribing decisions in their specialist area, and the introduction of supplementary prescribing will allow nurses to write many of those prescriptions themselves.
  3. allhart

    allhart New Member

    did everyone already know about this?
  4. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    When it comes to drugs, I have learned over and over again the hard way that Pharmacists know a lot more than doctors, and their knowledge is not all one-sided (ie. from drug company reps) like doctor's knowledge is. I am very glad to see this; thanks for posting it. I'll bet doctors are not happy about it.
    Klutzo
  5. herekitty

    herekitty New Member

    Yes, but isn't this just in England?
    Kitty =^..^=

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