Physical Therapist was very hard on me

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Chelz, Jan 27, 2009.

  1. Chelz

    Chelz New Member

    I have tried physical therapy, once again. I had my first appointment yesterday. I have FM, disk problems in my back, and I also have horrible hip/buttock/thigh pain as well. My hip and thigh pain was always somewhat painful, but after I had a very large lipmoa removed from my right hip/buttock area, the pain has been excrutiating at times.

    Now, getting back to this therapist, she was tough, neve had one like this before. She knows about my FM, but says she will treat me for my orthopedic problems first.

    At first, I did not like this woman. She had told me that with FM, what I need to do is soak in a 93 degree pool, then afterwards have strenuous exercises with a physical therapist present. I should do this 2 to 3 times per week, she said "statistics" show this is what works. "Statistics regarding FM can be useless, all FM cases are different just like all MS cases are different or CFS for that matter.

    I stared at her with disbelief and I finally told her "You obviously do not have FM" I was trying to be nice about it, because getting all angry just puts me in more of a flare and my fatigue will go through the roof.

    She seemed to soften a little after I said this. I was trying to be a good sport and I said "Let's just not concentrate on that for now". This seemed to work and she was a little more agreeable.

    Next, she did give me a good examination and she did spend time with me, she just had a tough demeaner. She said that she will search out a good pool for me that is warm, she also gave me a lot of hints on how I have to change my desk around at work. She wants me to bring in all the shoes that I usually wear and she will evaluate what should be the best for me.

    I did tell her to please do not give me any of those dumb exercise sketches for me to take home and do, I told her If I could do those exercises, I wouldn't be in physical therapy, I could just read them off some magazine or something. She agreed and at least listened to what I had to say, I was surprised.

    She listened and I think she gained some respect for me at that point, I told her I needed to go slow with anything she prescribes for me, and YES eventually my FM will have to be taken into consideration. I do not know how this will all pan out in the end, but for now I will keep my next appointment with her, I think I may be able to work this out.

    My insurance for physical therapy is excellent. I have unlimited visits and they will only cost me $10.00 co-pay per visit, so that is not a problem, thank goodness for that.

    Because I have always been so sensitive emotionally, I would have walked out in the past. Since I started working in a hospital, believe it or not, you do develop a toughness, I work in medical records, not an easy job, maybe this has helped me a little. I will see how this works out for me. Thanks for listening. Hugs, Chelz.


  2. quanked

    quanked Member

    If you care to share, why do you think that working in a hospital has toughened you up? What I say next is kind of a "tongue in cheek" kind of thing--is working in the medical field like working in the corrections field, a kind of us against them kind of group think thing?

    I just had a conflict yesterday with my dr.'s support staff and I get the feeling that I am have been labeled "difficult" by some.

    Your description of your communications with the PT was useful to me. It does sound like there were 2 people talking and 2 people listening to each other. I am glad that you were able to work through some of your concerns about your service provider. I am curious about this tough thing though.
  3. quanked

    quanked Member

    If you care to share, why do you think that working in a hospital has toughened you up? What I say next is kind of a "tongue in cheek" kind of thing--is working in the medical field like working in the corrections field, a kind of us against them kind of group think thing?

    I just had a conflict yesterday with my dr.'s support staff and I get the feeling that I am have been labeled "difficult" by some.

    Your description of your communications with the PT was useful to me. It does sound like there were 2 people talking and 2 people listening to each other. I am glad that you were able to work through some of your concerns about your service provider. I am curious about this tough thing though.
  4. Chelz

    Chelz New Member

    Reply to quanked. I had always thought that working for a hospital, I would get a little more compassion and understanding because afterall, people who go there are sick or recovering. This may and should be true for the patients as it should be, but the employees are a different matter.

    When I started working in medical records, I couldn't believe how fast paced this position was. The training for this particular position was next to nothing. Having FM and all the physical problems and brain fog that go along with it, this position was extremely challenging for me.

    No one had the time to expain how complex this position can be, I'm not even sure why I was hired for it, but anyway, the people in my immediate area, which is about 30 people, always seemed so unhappy, and TOUGH. I couldn't figure out why. I used to work in Real Estate in the office, and although that was tough too, at least there was good training, a desk for you to sit at and become acquainted with the job, not so in medical records.

    Having to deal with doctors who need to sign their charts in a reasonable time frame was very difficult, they were always trying to get away with not coming in and doing this function.

    I also deal with the public who comes in and want there records, all kinds of people come through and some try to get records of other people, you just develop a toughness after a while, but you also have to be courteous because you are dealing with customer service, a very hard balance to do. So, in other words, you have to have patience which was not always a good attribute of mine.

    For at least two years of working there, I had to fight to get a desk just to do my work, there wasn't enough around, managers were constantly pulling you in a million different directions before you even had a complete understanding of the medical record itself, very stressful.

    I finally had to put my foot down, after years of being tossed around the department. Others felt the same way I did, so I was not alone in this. I told my boss that I needed my own desk in order for me to feel grounded and organized in my job and I had waited long enough for this.

    I was given a desk soon after that discussion with my boss, and at least could now become a little organized. Hospitals are very diverse and you have to learn to deal with a lot of personalities, the pace is fast, at least in my department, and you really have to help yourself or the stress will do you in sometimes.

    Having compassion and a sense of toughness go hand in hand in a hospital, and trying to achieve that balance is crucial and takes a lot of time. I really do think it has helped me grow in the end, I didn't think I had it in me to do this, so it was a big challenge for me with all my chronic pain and fatigue issues, but that is my issue, and if I wanted to continue to work there, I had to learn to "work smart".

    I do share a desk with a night shift person, thank goodness she didn't mind when I told her my physical therapist strongly urged me to change my desk around because of my pain issues. I wanted to be fair to her as well since she used the desk, not so many people in this department would have been agreeable with this, but she was.

    So all in all, I hope that gives you an idea. In the long run, I am glad to have this job. I'm not sure if all hospitals operate like this. Thanks for asking. Hugs, Chelz.

  5. quanked

    quanked Member

    Thanks so much for taking the time to explain aabout becoming tough. I think that you explained it very well.

    I had no idea about the pace in a hospital. It sounds daunting. I am not sure I get it though. Correct me if I am wrong but I thought hospitals are for profit. Your work environement sounds more like a government agency where there is never enough space or employees than a for profit business. But in someways what you wrote may explain some things that have happened to me in medical settings. The nurses at my dr.'s office seem like drill sargents somedays. They are uptight and do not want to spend one more second with me than necessary. Perhaps they are pressed for time. I had problems getting documents signed by a dr. for my husband for a workman's comp claim. It was like pulling teeth. I could not fathom why it would be so difficult to get a signature and diagnosis. Of course these are medical clinic settings and not a hospital.

    A friend of mine recently went to work in a tribal medical clinic. She told me a couple of days ago about the incredible issues around charts. Who knew. Certainly not me.

    What can patients do to help things go smoother both for the medical personnel and themselves? I try to be prepared but maybe I can do more.

    Glad you have a cooperative desk mate. I marvel at your tenacity and ability to work at such a difficult job given your medical issues. Take care.