PLEASE HAVE THYROID CHECKED

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by desertrose23, Aug 1, 2003.

  1. desertrose23

    desertrose23 New Member

    Hello:

    This is just an insight to some people who are diagnosed and unfortunately misdiagnosed. Do you know that MOST WOMEN are not checked for their thyroid which also controls anxiety, joint pain, muscle pain, tiredness, and all other symptoms associated with fibroymalgia. I have been diagnosed with fibro and guess what ladies, my thyroid is very low. Since I was the one to mention it to my Dr., because it was the last thing they checked she put me on synthroid. I no longer have pain, more energy etc. I know that fibroymyalgia is real and so is CFS. BUT, if any woman out there 30 years or older PLEASE have your thyroid checked. Also, I am on lexapro, but I need to know if any one out there has this side effect mainly "itching". Please let me know. Thanks
  2. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    About 3/4 of everyone with FM have low thyroid, in fact many specialists believe fm is nothing more than untreated hypothyroidism, and to a point I have to agree with them. I felt lousy until the specialist increased my synthroid...he said I tested normal, but "low" normal. Within two weeks I was a new person, no fog, no pain, no fatigue and I slept like a baby. Women from 40 up or starting menopause are particularly prone to hypothyroidism.

    Marilyn :)
  3. Magee

    Magee Guest

    Ask for a thyroid TEST not a screening, ask them to check the T3 and T4 levels. If the T4's are not converting to T3's, you have FMS-like symptoms. The screening does not show both of these levels. My friend was treated for this and her symptoms were gone in 2 1/2 weeks and it has now been 2 years without any FMS symptoms.
    T.
  4. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I'm afraid that if you just ask for the thyroid test, they will just do a TSH test and that won't tell you the whole truth about what's going on with your thyroid. You need to be specific and request thyroid antibodies, Free T3 and Free T4, plus TSH. You will also need an endoc to interpret the results because the GP's don't have a clue past the TSH.

    Marilyn :)
    [This Message was Edited on 08/01/2003]
  5. desertrose23

    desertrose23 New Member

    THANK YOU FOR THE INPUT RE: HOW FM AND THE THYROID. I FOUND THIS OUT BY DOING MY OWN RESEARCH. THEY DID A BLOOD TEST ON ME IT CAME BACK NORMAL, I ADAMANTLY ASKED FOR THE T3 AND T4, STILL STATING I WAS NORMAL. I JUST KNEW IN MY OWN MIND IT WAS MY THYROID AND DEMANDED A THYROID SCAN, AND SURE ENOUGH THEY FOUND IT. BUT I AM VERY HAPPY THAT YOU REPLIED BACK AND THANKING YOU FOR THE INFO. I JUST HOPE A LOT MORE WOMEN EVEN MEN WILL BE TESTED FOR THIS TOO. I JUST WANT THE ITCHING TO STOP FROM THE LEXAPRO. THE DR.ONLY PRESCRIBED IT TO ME FOR THE FIBRO, BUT SINCE I'VE BEEN ON SYNTHROID THE PAIN IS GONE, AND I DO NOT KNOW THE REPERCUSSIONS ON QUITTING THE LEXAPRO, BUT THE ITCHING HAS GOT TO GO. WISH ME LUCK.
  6. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Came back "normal," but I had symptoms, so my doc prescribed Synthroid empirically. I have felt better since being on it and my tests have improved.

    Before prescribing, he had me go for a stress test, which I passed with flying colors.

    Love, Mikie
  7. mrcpvls

    mrcpvls New Member

    Thanks for the info. I have had my thyroid checked numerous times and they always tell me its normal. I am going to ask for the full gamit as I doubt they have been doing an extensive test here in Canada. My mother had a goiter and two of my brothers are taking medication for thyroid problems. One of my brothers thyroid no longer works.
  8. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    Within 24 hrs. of my first dose of Armour Thyroid, my energy was almost back to normal. It has not helped my pain the way it has some others here, but I have been unable to go higher than 45 mgs. daily without suffering total insomnia.

    My doctor would flip at the amt. Madwolf takes, as she told me women over 50 should not take more than 120 mgs. without making absolutely sure they have no signs of heart disease, and most people don't need more than 120 mgs.. Her maximum dose she will give is 150 mgs.

    Many docs do not know that the "normal" ranges have been lowered dramatically and they erroneously still think any TSH up to 5.0 is normal. The new upper limit for TSH is 3.0, and it is 2.0 if hypothryoid or depression run in your family. Some docs believe about 50% of people dx'd as depressed are really hypothyroid.

    Klutzo
  9. lassiecass

    lassiecass New Member

    Hi All,
    Just thought I would ask if anyone besides me has hyperthyroid. My GP sent me to and Endo but he concured with the GP that I have Graves disease. They are still waiting for my thyroid to burn itself out. That has been going on for 6 or 7 years now. Somedays it is really fast and heart races and some days I can barely move. I don't like the thought of going back to the Endo cause it was really expensive and my insurance won't pay anything thyroid related.
    Soft Hugs,
    Sandy (Cass)
  10. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    Why in the world won't your ins. pay for anything thyroid related? It's a medical disease for crying out loud. Are you sure?

    Marilyn
  11. RedB

    RedB New Member

    in Synthroid (which I take 100mcg of), and Armour Thyroid?

    And exactly how much is 100 mcgs?

    Kathy
  12. lassiecass

    lassiecass New Member

    Hi Marilyn,
    Unfortunatly, we only have major medical and the thyroid was diagnosed before it took affect. They consider anything tyhroid related a preexsisting disease. Great way to not have to pay huh? We own a small shop and insurance costs are kind of prohibitive so we went with major medical. We had no in insurance for years. We just paid for everything out of pocket.
    Soft Hugs,
    Sandy (Cass)
  13. jkd7058

    jkd7058 New Member

    was if I'd had my thyroid checked. She said that the blood testing doesn't show a true picture of what's happening. She gave me a test kit to take home in which you collect syliva first thing in the morning, then you mail it directly to the lab. I tried to do it but since I also suffer from Sjogern's syndrom it was next to impossible. It took me over 45 minutes (most people could do it in one spit :). Then I had to pour 1/4 of it into another tube -- and sh%t I poured it down the sink. I was in tears. She gave me another test kit but I just haven't felt like trying again.

    Now you've given me encouragement. I'm going to find that kit and do it this week-end.
  14. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    "What is the difference in Synthroid (which I take 100mcg of), and Armour Thyroid? And exactly how much is 100 mcgs?"

    Synthroid is a synthetic reproduction of thyroid hormone. It is only T4. Armour, on the other hand, is natural thyroid hormone from pigs. It has both T4 and T3 in it. Armour was used exclusively before the synthetic version was developed. In many cases, the natural thyroid hormone is so much better for anyone with hypothyroidism.

    I can't answer the mcg (microgram) question...I just know it as mcg!

    Marilyn :)
  15. denton

    denton New Member

    Barbara, who and where is your doctor? I have had such a hard time finding a doctor that would first listen and secondly try new things. All I am stuck with are ones that either think I am a drug addict that just needs to detox or writes me a prescription for drugs and sends me on my way. I tried to get my GP to test for thyroid. He finally relented after many tears. Of course, the test did not show him anything out of the ordinary. My scores are in the low average. I need help on where to go...
  16. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    The new acceptable TSH levels are now .30 - 3.00 Females want to be as close to 1.0 as possible. However, TSH levels don't mean anything. What you need is Free T3 and Free T4 tests done. TSH can be fine and Free T3 can be out of whack, thus giving you the symptoms.

    Marilyn :)
  17. desertrose23

    desertrose23 New Member

    I guess I started this whole thing on the thyroid. My advice is to find another Dr. Evidently this person doesn't appear to be very concerned that you had to revert to tears for him to test you. Plus if your levels are low, why hasn't he put you on anything. Best advice is find a specialist in your area and get this under control. I was so adamant with my Dr. that I told her you either do this or I will report you to the AMA that you are not doing your job and whamo, that's the last thing they need to hear.
    Good luck to you and do what's best for yourself, not what some stupid Dr decides what he wants to do.
  18. sherria

    sherria New Member

    It really blew me away when I heard about someone else with Graves! I am now 43 years old, and have suffered from thyroid disease since 1976 (I was merely 16!). It started when I was on my way back from a 30 day stay at a correctional institution for teens back in 1976. I was in the car with my parents and noticed a huge lump on the front of my neck. To make a long, long story short, my mom took me to an Endo and found out that I had Grave's disease. After that visit, everything started adding up. The erratic behavior (I was a VERY uncontrollable teen, which is what landed me at the girls home in the first place), my eyes were bulging out, and my hands shook so bad that I could barely write my name straight. My heart raced, and I was extremely hyper, and also had trouble sleeping. The docs tried treating me with pills for a while (I was up to about 13 a day - remember, this was in 1976, technology has come a lot further!), but ended up doing surgery, and removing half of my thyroid gland, hence leaving me "underactive", in which I've taken synthroid for many, many years. Well, last year I had nodules on the other half of my thyroid, which the docs thought could become cancerous, so that was removed last May as well. Now, I'm on complete thyroid replacement, and still take synthroid. My main point of this message, is that the people who are posting messages about the inaccuracies of a lot of these thyroid function tests are ABSOLUTELY RIGHT! I have to admit that I haven't been the most compliant person when it comes to taking my medication properly, and had been without my synthroid for a while (due to lack of insurance!), so I went to my family doctor who took some thyroid tests. Can you BELIEVE they came out normal????? IMPOSSIBLE! I have NO thyroid gland - - - PERIOD! Because I happen to be so knowledgeable about these tests (due to dealing with this problem for years), it was I who had to INSIST that the doctor perform not only the TSH, but the free T3, T4 , and thyroid uptake and function studies. It was then that they found out that I was close to complete thyroid shutdown! You see, in order to get accurate readings, one test result from one different test is not enough. It takes the results of all of these tests being combined to get a true and accurate reading. What the TSH is, is the "thyroid stimulating hormone". This test should read rather low, because elevated readings usually indicate hypothyroidism. This is because the "TSH" has to overwork itself to compensate for the lack of thyroid sucretion, or the fluid that the thyroid puts out to the body. Consider the thyroid the "gas pedal of the body." Most people don't realize that thyroxin is crucial to the normal function of almost all of our major organs. If there isn't enough, everything slows down - - your heart rate, metablism, kidneys, liver, blood flow, brain activity, etc. That's why when underactive, you gain weight, feel sluggish, can't concentrate, etc. You can't tolerate extreme cold OR extreme heat. Your hair falls out, your nails are brittle and break. Many people are medicated for extreme depression, only to find out that once their thyroid is stabilized, they're no longer depressed. That is one thing that is greatly overlooked in the medical profession. I think that after all these years of what I've been through with my thyroid, I know enough to be an Endocrinologist myself! There have been times that I've not only amazed some doctors with the knowledge that I have on this, but I've also pissed a few off, because they don't like anyone else (especially a patient!) tell them something they don't know. Please note that this is normally only in the case of a doctor that doesn't really specializ in endocrine problems (e.g., family practitioners, etc.) Don't get me wrong, I'm not tooting my own horn, and I'm certainly no "rocket scientist", it's just that I've lived with this problem for 27 years, and using my own experiences, as well as researching and reading things on my own, I've learned to take control of this problem. My advice to you is READ, READ, READ! And for God's sake, don't go to your family physician for EVERYTHING! It would be the equivalent of going to your tv repairman, or refridgerator repairman, to fix the transmission on your car! Just because they're "mechanically inclined" doesn't mean they can fix your transmission! They may have some general abilities, but don't specialize in that area. When you follow everything your doc says, and still don't feel right, don't stop there. Insist that you know that something still isn't right, and don't EVER let someone tell you that it's in YOUR HEAD! You know YOU more than anyone else does. If you don't find an answer the first time - - - don't stop there. This should be a general thought for everyone to consider. I'm sorry this message was soooo long - - - I didn't mean to write a book, but there's just so much to this. Good luck to you and feel free to respond and ask questions if you need to - I'd be glad to share any info I have, and if I don't have it, I can probably find out! Best wishes - - Sherri
  19. sherria

    sherria New Member

    Hi Barbara:

    Sorry, I think I read so many postings about the thyroid issue, that everything kind of ran together! I guess your post was the last one that I read before I replied. As much experience as I have with thyroid problems and the treatments, I am sincerely perplexed as to why I've never even heard of this "Armour" thyroid treatment. What does this do that Synthroid does not? It seems that no matter what, I always feel horrible, even when my levels are supposedly "normal". Sometimes I'm shocked when my thyroid levels are up to normal, because I don't feel any different. It may seem ridiculous that I would be disappointed when my tests come back normal, but at least if they were still low, it would explain how miserable I feel! When that happens, I begin to think it must be all in my head. I guess everyone who feels badly, wants there to be a medical reason why - - - no one wants to believe that they could actually just be "depressed"! It's so much easier to treat a medical problem than a mental one! Thanks for the info - - if you have any additional information, please feel free . . .

    Sherri
  20. poodlemommy

    poodlemommy New Member

    This was an interesting posting by all of you on thyroid and fibro. I have been in chronic pain for over 3 years. I had a car accident over a year ago and off work ever since.While doing CT scans on my neck after the car accident they found cancer in my thyroid. My thyroid results always showed normal yet for years I felt I was hypo thyroid. After my accident especially. I lost weight and was hot all the time. I had surgery in Jan 2003 to take out my whole thyroid. Had radioactive iodine 2 months ago. I am on eltroxin 0.15. My pain levels are high, I am tired, lots of headaches,this last few weeks my hair is falling out like crazy. I go back to the endo in a few weeks. I put on 4 pounds too. This all started in the last 3 weeks. Am I hypo or hyper thyroid right now. Can they increase my dose. Do you think the fibro will improve. I have all the trigger points and the accident made it so much worse so is the fibro because of an accident I had many years ago and now worse because of the recent accident or is it the thyroid cancer. I am stumped. What do you people think.
    your fibor friend, poodlemum