please help with suggestions for doctors visit

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by witsend, Dec 4, 2002.

  1. witsend

    witsend New Member

    I have been lucky enough to get an appointment right away with another doctor after my disasterous visit 2 weeks ago with the rheumy from ****. Can any one give me suggested tips or approaches to try with new doctor. I feel my life is going down the toilet as crippled and housebound as I have become in the last year. I have been fighting this dd for 14 years.
  2. witsend

    witsend New Member

    I have been lucky enough to get an appointment right away with another doctor after my disasterous visit 2 weeks ago with the rheumy from ****. Can any one give me suggested tips or approaches to try with new doctor. I feel my life is going down the toilet as crippled and housebound as I have become in the last year. I have been fighting this dd for 14 years.
  3. kellym

    kellym New Member

    I would have them check (via blood test) your ATP, Natural Killer Cell, and antioxidant levels so they can see in black and white what's up with your energy level and immune system. My rheumy has found these tests VERY helpful in trying to treat underlying causes with her patients.
    LOTS OF LUCK!
    KellyM
  4. pam_d

    pam_d New Member

    You are lucky to get another appt. so fast, hopefully this one will go better!

    One thing I always do now, is make a one-page document to take with me to new doctors. I list every symptom I have, prioritizing which are the most painful or prominent, and in parentheses after each I list how long I have had this symptom, or if it's constant or intermitent.

    Then, I list every test I have ever had & BRIEFLY what the results were (ex: bloodwork, MRIs, nerve conduction studies, spinal tap) and what ailments were eliminated (ex: lyme disease, lupus, MS, rheumatoid arthritis). Also list other conditions (like high blood pressure, for ex.) you know you have.

    Keep it to ONE easy to read page, so it won't be disregarded---most docs will read one page, but they don't want a stack of documents.

    I find this saves time & explanation of several years of tests, treatment, sympyoms, etc.

    Good luck & I'm hoping for the best for you!!

    Hugs,
    Pam
  5. twjen

    twjen New Member

    I did the list thing with my first Dr. I had. He accused me of needing serious phyciatric help. When I told him that I already had it (LOL) and the phyc said I was perfectly mentaly stable and would write him a letter confirming it, the Dr. I had went NUTS, because he said my notes (which he kept) with too many complaints meant I was crazy and he refused to treat me.. A..H... he was. I would suggest WITSEND not take a list to her first visit and "feel" the Dr. out a bit first. Do not go into dramatic detail of the past accept for when you had your first FULL BLOWN serious flare up. dont tell the new Dr. about every little thing you think caused it or happend before, just stick to the major stuff. Dont mention the depression (Yet), or you may take the focus off your physical well being. This is what I am learning and hope it helps. I agree with PAM D about keeping a list of your major symptoms and keep them for your memory so you can review it and try not to forget to share with Dr.
    GOOD LUCK and GOD BLESS! Jen
  6. teach6

    teach6 New Member

    I always take a list. If I don't I forget half if not more of what I wanted to say. It's kind of like the call I got from a doctor's office today saying they received my payment envelope in the mail, but the check was missing. That's pretty typical for me these days.

    Going to a new doc can be nerve-wracking enough without adding the extra stress of trying to remember what you want to tell him/her.

    Barbara
  7. karen2002

    karen2002 New Member

    The list is a wonderful idea, sometimes we omit things, that we later wish we would have included.

    I think one of the most important things to do though is this:

    Find out from the Doctor how many Fibro/Cfs patients he/she is currently treating, and with what kind of results. Those who have a good client base, that are making improvement, are more than happy to relate this good news to you. I really think this is paramount.

    Doctors that have large patient numbers in this profile are more compassionate, wanting to be your advocate, know what current treatment methods are being employed and working, and importantly keep up with all the latest research.
    Those that are disbelieving of these syndromes, or do not regularly treat us, are usually not very helpful. In the first case, the disbelieving--how can you effectively treat that which you don't believe in? In the second, how can you treat that which you do not understand?

    Best Wishes,
    Karen

    [This Message was Edited on 12/04/2002]