Prevalence and Symptoms of CFS in Adolescents

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Slayadragon, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Slayadragon

    Slayadragon New Member

    This was obtained on the Co-Cure Web site.

    There's a big sample size problem, since CFS is rare enough that you need huge samples to find anything meaningful.

    Unfortunately, there's precious little of anything else thus far, so I thought I'd pass it on.


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    Incidence, Prognosis, and Risk Factors for Fatigue and Chronic Fatigue
    Syndrome in Adolescents: A Prospective Community Study

    Journal: PEDIATRICS Vol. 119 No. 3 March 2007, pp. E603-E609
    (doi:10.1542/peds.2006-2231)

    Authors: Katharine A. Rimes, DPhil [a], Robert Goodman, PhD , Matthew
    Hotopf, PhD [a], Simon Wessely, MD [a], Howard Meltzer, PhD [c] and Trudie
    Chalder, PhD [a]

    Affiliation: King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry
    [a] Section of General Hospital Psychiatry
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom
    [c] Academic Department of Psychiatry, Brandon Mental Health Unit,
    Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom

    NLM Citation: PMID: 17332180

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence,
    prevalence, risk factors, and prognosis of fatigue, chronic fatigue, and
    chronic fatigue syndrome in 11- to 15-year-olds.

    METHODS. A random general population sample (n = 842) of British
    adolescents and their parents were assessed at baseline and 4 to 6 months
    later. The main outcomes were fatigue, chronic fatigue, and chronic fatigue
    syndrome, operationally defined.

    RESULTS. The incidence over 4 to 6 months was 30.3% for fatigue, 1.1% for
    chronic fatigue, and 0.5% for chronic fatigue syndrome. The point
    prevalence was 34.1% and 38.1% for fatigue, 0.4% and 1.1% for chronic
    fatigue, and 0.1% and 0.5% for chronic fatigue syndrome at time 1 and time
    2, respectively. Of participants who were fatigued at time 1, 53% remained
    fatigued at time 2. The 3 cases of chronic fatigue and 1 case of chronic
    fatigue syndrome at time 1 had recovered by time 2. Higher risk for
    development of chronic fatigue at time 2 was associated with time 1 anxiety
    or depression, conduct disorder, and maternal distress; in multivariate
    analysis, baseline anxiety or depression remained a significant predictor
    of chronic fatigue. Increased risk for development of fatigue at time 2 was
    associated with time 1 anxiety or depression, conduct disorder, and older
    age; in multivariate analyses, these factors and female gender all were
    significant predictors of fatigue.

    CONCLUSIONS. The incidence rates for chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue
    syndrome in this adolescent sample were relatively high, but the prognosis
    for these conditions was good. This prospective study provides evidence for
    an association between emotional/behavioral problems and subsequent onset
    of fatigue/chronic fatigue.


    Key Words: chronic fatigue . incidence . prognosis . risk factors . prevalence
    Abbreviations: CFS-chronic fatigue syndrome . CF-chronic fatigue .
    CDC-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . GHQ-General Health
    Questionnaire . CI-confidence interval


    Accepted Oct 16, 2006.