ProHealth Article: Genetic Test for CFS?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by mezombie, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. mezombie

    mezombie Member

    There's an excellent, easy-to-read, article in the latest ProHealth E-mail bulletin on Dr. Gow's application for a patent based on his genetic research on CFS.

    Just click on the "E-mail Bulletin" tab at the top of this page, then "latest e-mail bulletin" and then scroll down to the Resarch section and click on "UK Researchers Apply for ...Patent"

    The last part, written with bullets, provides an excellent summmary of Dr. Gow's research and its potential for diagnosing and treating CFS.
    [This Message was Edited on 10/21/2006]
  2. mezombie

    mezombie Member

  3. quilp

    quilp New Member

    But has this really told us anything different other than what was announced 15months ago ? There is still no definitive diagnosis and no mention of any specific treatment. Lets hope the details reveal more. Here's hoping
  4. mezombie

    mezombie Member

    I posted this because there have been a lot of posts on here lately focusing on the CDC's genetic research, which specifically dealt only with genes implicated in the stress response.

    The CDC has a PR arm and held a news conference on their findings. As a result, a lot of newspapers are touting the CDC's study as "groundbreaking" and many people seem convinced that a genetic inability to process stress is "the" cause of CFS.

    Dr. Gow also looked at genetic defects in people with CFS, but did not limit himself to those related to stress. He also studied people who met the CDC's Fukuda definition of CFS, which the CDC did not.

    I just want to remind people to consider <b>all</b> the research that's out there.
  5. Forebearance

    Forebearance Member

    Thanks, mezombie!
  6. mezombie

    mezombie Member

    I'm excited about all the various research which points to genetic markers. Combine that with the findings of this year's Nobel Prize for Medicine, and you've got HOPE!

    The Nobel Prize winners discovered how to "silence" genes through RNA interference. Their findings have already been successfully applied in animals to "switch off" the gene causing high blood cholestorol levels! Check out Nobelprize.com for more info, or the thread posted by Marta608 earlier this month (thanks again, Marta!).

    I really feel that the combination of finding the genes that are part of the cause of CFS and the knowledge to "silence" them will get the pharmaceutical industry interested, and will have a big impact on our lives.
  7. Slayadragon

    Slayadragon New Member

    It is stupid how long it takes the establishment to get around to "learn" about these types of findings. I had a genetic test for several immune genes done about five years ago, and it came out very bad. The fact that both my grandfather and my brother apparently had the disease too made me convinced that it was genetic.

    Still, it's good that the establishment has finally gotten around to accepting this sort of research. Hopefully it will encourage the drug companies to believe it's a real disease (as opposed to hypochondria etc.) and start to work on addressing it with at least somewhat effective (if expensive) drugs.

    With several avenues to pursue (anti-virals, immune system boosters like super-charged versions of what used to be called MGN-3, and detoxification methods), a hefty amount of R&D money should get them somewhere.

    it may take five years to come up with ones that work (and another five years to get them through the FDA), but at least there does seem to be some hope on the horizon.

    That's a lot more than I would have imagined even a year ago, when it seemed that no one would ever believe I was really sick. So I'm taking this as very good news indeed.
  8. Jeanette62

    Jeanette62 New Member

    I find this very interesting because both my mom and aunt have FMS and on my Dad's side I have a cousin with FMS and Lupus. She spent a lot of time with our grandmother who died before I was born and thinks she may have had FMS as well. I think there is a genetic connection. My aunt on my mom's side and I both had the FMS start after a bad fall causing various injuries to our bodies.

    It would be great to have a reliable genetic test. I worry about both of my children developing it. My 18 yr old son seems to be tired all the time. Makes me wonder.

    Jeanette
  9. Marta608

    Marta608 Member

    I continue to be encouraged by articles like this regarding genetic markers for our illness as well as the findings about our misguided neurotransmitters. I truly feel we're on the right road. It's all good news.

    Thanks for posting.

    Marta
  10. mezombie

    mezombie Member

  11. Jeanette62

    Jeanette62 New Member

    I find this very interesting because both my mom and aunt have FMS and on my Dad's side I have a cousin with FMS and Lupus. She spent a lot of time with our grandmother who died before I was born and thinks she may have had FMS as well. I think there is a genetic connection. My aunt on my mom's side and I both had the FMS start after a bad fall causing various injuries to our bodies.

    It would be great to have a reliable genetic test. I worry about both of my children developing it. My 18 yr old son seems to be tired all the time. Makes me wonder.

    Jeanette
  12. findmind

    findmind New Member

    Hi,mezzie! Yeah, I read this with great interest, it is exciting news.

    Thanks for posting it for others to learn more about CFS.

    I was delighted to read that this is NOT a genetic predisposition as the CDC would have us believe, but that it is an "acquired condition", that is, no, we are not born with CFS, but CFS makes the changes in the genes. That is vital info to me.

    The only thing to discover now, is what particular thing(s) (types of infections, autoimmunity diseases, etc.) CAUSE the disease. To me, the NCF is the only group looking for that part of the puzzle.

    Did you notice that Dr. Gow calls it myalgic encephalitis, not encephalomyelitis? Interesting, huh?

    Thanks for thinking of me when you posted this! My brain does not allow me to associate people with interests and findings, LOL. I just "punt" here, and hope no one minds.

    There's always hope, especially if this leads to treatments for ALL, rich and poor alike, which I doubt will happen. Can you see an HMO or Medicaid ordering a genetic test? HA!

    Laterr....
    findmind
  13. quilp

    quilp New Member

    There is another well respect CFS reseracher called Dr Kerr in London, who I believe is trialing the drug Interferon. he believes there will be an effective treatment for most People with CFS within five years. Also is there any more news on Jose Montoya at Stanford University ? He was said to have had outstanding results using anti-virals but it has been met with scepticism on this side of the pond.
  14. mezombie

    mezombie Member

  15. mezombie

    mezombie Member

    Findmind: Yes, I found it encouraging that Dr. Gow found that the disease process underlying CFS/ME is causing genetic changes, rather than the other way around. It makes a lot of sense. I think that's been found in other diseases as well.

    Interesting that he's referring to it as Myalgic Encephalitis. I have mixed feelings about the name. The "myelitis" part of the original M.E. definition has caused a lot of problems, but if it's accepted, then at least researchers could start tapping into all the research under that name instead of "CFS"! There's an interesting article by Byron Hyde on the Hummingbird site on this subject.

    Quilp: Yes, Jonathan Kerr is another one of my heroes. Haven't heard about anything from Jose Montoya of late.

    I try to keep up with the research, but I've been on "hiatus" for some years and feel like I'm playing cath-up. The CDC study is what made me decide to get back into the fray.
  16. findmind

    findmind New Member

    karinaxx's post about Parainfluenza-5!

    findmind