Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by JLH, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. JLH

    JLH New Member

    Research / News - A systematic review of prolotherapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain.


    "Prolotherapy, an injection-based treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain, has grown in popularity and has received significant recent attention.

    The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of prolotherapy for treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    MAIN RESULTS: Data from 34 case reports and case series and 2 nonrandomized controlled trials suggest prolotherapy is efficacious for many musculoskeletal conditions. However, results from 6 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are conflicting. Two RCTs on osteoarthritis reported decreased pain, increased range of motion, and increased patellofemoral cartilage thickness after prolotherapy. Two RCTs on low back pain reported significant improvements in pain and disability compared with control subjects, whereas 2 did not. All studies had significant methodological limitations.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are limited high-quality data supporting the use of prolotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain or sport-related soft tissue injuries. Positive results compared with controls have been reported in nonrandomized and randomized controlled trials. Further investigation with high-quality randomized controlled trials with noninjection control arms in studies specific to sport-related and musculoskeletal conditions is necessary to determine the efficacy of prolotherapy.".
    September 2005. "Prolotherapy, an injection-based treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain, has grown in popularity and has received significant recent attention. The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of prolotherapy for treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    MAIN RESULTS: Data from 34 case reports and case series and 2 nonrandomized controlled trials suggest prolotherapy is efficacious for many musculoskeletal conditions. However, results from 6 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are conflicting. Two RCTs on osteoarthritis reported decreased pain, increased range of motion, and increased patellofemoral cartilage thickness after prolotherapy. Two RCTs on low back pain reported significant improvements in pain and disability compared with control subjects, whereas 2 did not. All studies had significant methodological limitations.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are limited high-quality data supporting the use of prolotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain or sport-related soft tissue injuries. Positive results compared with controls have been reported in nonrandomized and randomized controlled trials. Further investigation with high-quality randomized controlled trials with noninjection control arms in studies specific to sport-related and musculoskeletal conditions is necessary to determine the efficacy of prolotherapy."


    Source: Remedy Find 03/06 Newsletter
  2. Tmprincess

    Tmprincess New Member

    I am very interested in this treatment, as a friend of mine had a 100% recovery after an accident to the neck. However;

    1.) It's expensive.
    2.) Insurance does not cover it at this time.
    3.) There is not enough statistics on FM patients.
    4.) It involves a whole lot of needles, and that terrifies me!

    But, i would love to hear from anyone who has FM and has had prolotherapy treatment.

    TM~
  3. ellenelle

    ellenelle Member

    It really increased her pain for a long time and she never quite recovered to where she was before the treatments. This was a few years ago. She is doing acceptably now, has moderate FM, not bad enough to keep her from working, but no thanks to the prolotherapy. I don't think this is not a good option for fibro folks.

    Ellen
    <br>[<i>This Message was Edited on 03/22/2006</i>]
  4. roge

    roge Member

    I believe prolotherapy and platlet rich plasma injections hold promise for those with FM for specific areas we have injured and never properly healed as yes those with FM do not heal properly - this is widely known. also, those with FM have a tendancy to have lose ligaments which there puts more strain in the muscles and tendons and prolotherapy does strengthen ligaments. platlet rich plasma would be better for muscles and tendons. I have researched this a lot in last few years and I will be going on growth hormone soon and will be doing both prolo and prp to try and help re- heal my chronic plantar faciitis, ankle tenosynivitis, tennis elbow and wrist tenosynivitis. I am one who believes in peripheral dysfunction of FM in addition to central sensitization, not just central sensitization and there are studies to prove the peripheral dysfunction. FMers tendons and muscle tendon junctions take a beating with normal everyday life and do not heal like normal people and why I believe many with FM actually have &quot;tendonitis&quot; and or &quot;tenosynivitis&quot; or &quot;tendonopathy&quot;.