QUESTION FOR SHIRL

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Annette2, Sep 1, 2002.

  1. Annette2

    Annette2 New Member

    I read in one of your posts that FMS can cause you to get hot spells. I am hot all the time now. I take hormones and they don't help. Nothing I do helps. Do you know for sure that FMS causes this? Why? Thanks for any answers you can give me.

    Annette2 aka Hot Mama
  2. Annette2

    Annette2 New Member

    I read in one of your posts that FMS can cause you to get hot spells. I am hot all the time now. I take hormones and they don't help. Nothing I do helps. Do you know for sure that FMS causes this? Why? Thanks for any answers you can give me.

    Annette2 aka Hot Mama
  3. Shirl

    Shirl New Member

    Yes, I sure did say that, I read it in one of Devin Starlanyl's books, but found an article on Immune board too on the sweating.

    I have been having 'hot flashes' or 'flushes' now for 16 years off and on. I cannot stand the hot weather either. I keep the A/C at 70 degress all day, and down to 65 degrees at night so I can use the mattress heating pad!

    I am always hot, but after the flash/flush passes I am freezing for a few minutes! Its crazy, but thats how it is.

    The reference in this article is small in the last paragraph. If I find anything else I will post it for you.


    Keep cool!

    Shalom, Shirl

    ____________________________________________________________
    Usefulness of the Fukuda and Holmes definition in the diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    ImmuneSupport.com

    05-10-2002


    P De Becker [1], J Nijs [1], N McGregor [2], K De Meirleir [1]

    Dept. of Human Physiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

    Collaborative Pain Research Unit

    Department of Biological Sciences

    Faculty of Science

    University of Newcastle

    Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia

    The Holmes and Fukuda criteria are widely used criteria all over the world, yet a specific European study regarding CFS patient symptomatology has not been conducted so far.

    This study was performed in an outpatient tertiary care setting fatigue clinic in Brussels. 2073 consecutive patients with major complaints of prolonged fatigue participated in the study. Multi-variate analyses were performed to assess the symptom presentation within a fatigued population and the differences between the Fukuda and Holmes definitions compared with an excluded chronic fatigued group in a large cohort of fatigued patients.

    Of the 2073 patients complaining of chronic fatigue, 1578 CFS patients fulfilling the Fukuda criteria (100% of CFS group) and 951 (60.3% of the CFS group) fulfilled the Holmes criteria. Discriminant function analysis revealed that the Fukuda and Holmes definitions can be differentiated by symptom severity and prevalence. The Holmes definition was more strongly associated than the Fukuda definition with the symptoms that differentiated the CFS patients from the patients that did not comply with the CFS definitions. The inclusion of ten additional symptoms was found to improve the sensitivity/ specificity and accuracy for selection of CFS patients.

    The CFS patients fulfilling the Holmes criteria have an increased symptom prevalence and severity of many of the symptoms that determine the difference between CFS and CF patients. Patients fulfilling the Fukuda criteria were less severely affected patients which leads to an increase in clinical heterogeneity.

    We can conclude that the use of the Holmes criteria defining symptoms of fatigue, swollen/tender lymph nodes, sore throat, muscle weakness, recurrent flu-like symptoms, postexertional fatgigue, myalgia, memory disturbance, nonrestorative sleep with addition of certain symptoms (hot flushes instead of low-grade fever, attention deficit, paralysis, new sensitivities to food/drugs, difficulties with words, urinary frequency, cold extremities, photophobia, muscle fasciculations, lightheadedness, exertional dyspnea and gastrointestinal distrurbance) to the Holmes definition and removal of others (arthralgia and low-grade fever) would strengthen the ability to select CFS patients, also the incorporation of a severity index would be beneficial for subcategorization patients.

    Source: www.ahmf.org


  4. Annette2

    Annette2 New Member

    Boy, that was a fast answer! I wonder why hot spells is a symptom of CFS? My temperature is never elevated - it's always normal! And I don't sweat - I'm just hot all the time. And when I'm in air conditioning, I get cold sweats, which really are horrible! Do you know what I can do to help it? Ugh!!!!!
  5. Shirl

    Shirl New Member

    The only thing that 'seemed' to make my less frequent was drinking water. I never in my life drank water.

    I read a book called; 'ABC of Asthma, Allergies & Lupus' by F. Batmanghelidj, md. The site is; www.watercure.com

    After reading this book, I realized I must have been seriously dehydrated! So I started drinking half my body weight in ounces of water a day, and taking about a quarter teaspoon of sea salt through out the day too (regular salt is fine too).

    Since then the sweats have decreased about 75%. Yes, that was a goodly amount! I am crediting it to the water drinking and the salt as I did nothing else different.

    If you are not a water drinker, its worth a try, it does not cost anything.

    This is just my experience though, I can't prove this except by my own experience.

    Shalom, Shirl

  6. Annette2

    Annette2 New Member

    Thanks for the tip. It doesn't sound far-fetched to me. I do drink water. I just need to drink more. I will give it a try!

    Annette2 :)