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Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by SharonR, Oct 26, 2002.

  1. SharonR

    SharonR New Member

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    Exercise, Therapy Can Help Gulf War Vets

    Talk therapy, low-impact exercise helped reduce mental stress, study says



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    SATURDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthScoutNews) -- Fatigue, distress and other mental and physical health problems suffered by American Gulf War veterans might be relieved by regular exercise and group talk therapy.
    That's the finding of a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.

    The study found that three months of low-impact exercise and/or weekly group sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) helped reduce the veterans' fatigue and distress and improved their mental health and ability.

    Physical function improved more in veterans who received CBT compared to those who didn't have it.

    The randomized study, which included 1,092 veterans at 18 hospitals, was done by researchers from the University of Michigan (U-M) Health System, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense.

    The veterans showed improvement whether they received exercise or CBT alone or a combination of the two, said researcher Dr. Daniel Clauw, a U-M rheumatologist, in a prepared statement. He said he's encouraged that such simple steps appear to help veterans, and added that the findings suggest this approach has real potential to improve the quality of life for these veterans.

    Gulf War Syndrome is a term used to describe chronic symptoms of fatigue, joint and muscle pain, headaches, memory loss, respiratory problems, and gastrointestinal symptoms affecting veterans who served in the Persian Gulf in 1990 and 1991.

    All the veterans in this study had fatigue that limited their normal activities, pain in at least two parts of their body, and problems with thinking and learning abilities. Many also suffered depression, an anxiety disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

    More information

    Here's where to go to learn more about Gulf War Illness.


    Copyright © 2002 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.
    Last updated 10/26/2002


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    Today's Other Top Stories:
    ADHD: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore
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    Exercise and Physical Activity

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    SOURCE: University of Michigan, news release, Oct. 26, 2002






  2. SharonR

    SharonR New Member

    EarthLink.net | Start Page | Web Mail | Biz Center | My Account | Support


    Search



    HealthScout
    Web
    MEDLINE




    Special Offers



    Inflammation and Pain

    Help manage your breathing condition

    Frequent Heartburn?

    Type 2 Diabetes Info

    Do your joints hurt?

    Free Diet profile!

    Parkinson's Info





    Top Features



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    Allergy Sufferers

    Mental Health Center

    Seniors Center

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    Is It A Cold or Allergies





    Resources


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    Home | Today | Women| Men| Kids| Seniors| Diseases| Addictions| Sex & Relationships| Diet, Fitness, Looks| Alternative Medicine| Drug Checker




    Advertisement



    Printer Friendly Send to a Friend


    Exercise, Therapy Can Help Gulf War Vets

    Talk therapy, low-impact exercise helped reduce mental stress, study says



    From our sponsors:
    Parkinson's Info


    What is Parkinson's disease? What are its symptoms?



    SATURDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthScoutNews) -- Fatigue, distress and other mental and physical health problems suffered by American Gulf War veterans might be relieved by regular exercise and group talk therapy.
    That's the finding of a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.

    The study found that three months of low-impact exercise and/or weekly group sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) helped reduce the veterans' fatigue and distress and improved their mental health and ability.

    Physical function improved more in veterans who received CBT compared to those who didn't have it.

    The randomized study, which included 1,092 veterans at 18 hospitals, was done by researchers from the University of Michigan (U-M) Health System, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense.

    The veterans showed improvement whether they received exercise or CBT alone or a combination of the two, said researcher Dr. Daniel Clauw, a U-M rheumatologist, in a prepared statement. He said he's encouraged that such simple steps appear to help veterans, and added that the findings suggest this approach has real potential to improve the quality of life for these veterans.

    Gulf War Syndrome is a term used to describe chronic symptoms of fatigue, joint and muscle pain, headaches, memory loss, respiratory problems, and gastrointestinal symptoms affecting veterans who served in the Persian Gulf in 1990 and 1991.

    All the veterans in this study had fatigue that limited their normal activities, pain in at least two parts of their body, and problems with thinking and learning abilities. Many also suffered depression, an anxiety disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

    More information

    Here's where to go to learn more about Gulf War Illness.


    Copyright © 2002 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.
    Last updated 10/26/2002


    Related Stories:

    Kids Need to Warm Up Before Exercise, Too
    Abuse of the Mind
    Any Exercise Is Better Than No Exercise
    Intense Exercise Cuts Heart Risk
    Marathon Training a Test of Endurance



    Today's Other Top Stories:
    ADHD: It's Not Just for Kids Anymore
    Exercise, Therapy Can Help Gulf War Vets

    more...


    Related Encyclopedia Items
    Exercise and Physical Activity

    Advertisement


    What is Acid Reflux Disease?

    Allergy Sufferers

    Seniors Health Center

    Sexual Health

    Mental Health Center

    Headache Sufferers



    SOURCE: University of Michigan, news release, Oct. 26, 2002






  3. allhart

    allhart New Member

    it didnt say a hugh improvent did it and it didnt metion that some of the days patients couldnt get out of bed or that ups and downs are a normal processes and a study might not be acurate because of that,exercise can improve anyone a little but i think its mostly mental because we are trying to do something to help ourselfs and most of us hate to addmit yet anthor things not helping, all this exercise studies are a waste of money and time i think drs are just trying to find a easy way out because there at a loss,i
    hope im not offending anyone its just my option and for the record i do exercise to try and keep strenth and mucsle tone,
  4. SharonR

    SharonR New Member

    Not to be taken for granted, just what is out there on the "net".
    Smiles
    SharonR