Red radish info, here ya go.

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by JaciBart, Oct 7, 2002.

  1. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    Just found this, I will come back & add to it if I find more..............this is all specific to red radishes

    Nutritional Highlights
    Radishes, 1 cup (88g) (raw, sliced)
    Calories: 23
    Protein: 0.69g
    Carbohydrate: 4.2g
    Total Fat: 0.63g
    Fiber: 1.85g
    *Excellent source of: Vitamin C (26.4mg)

    Daikon, 1 radish, 7 inches (17cm) long (oriental radish, raw)
    Calories: 61
    Protein: 2.03g
    Carbohydrate: 13.9g
    Total Fat: 0.34g
    Fiber: 5.4g
    *Excellent source of: Potassium (767mg), Vitamin C (74mg), and Folate (95mcg)
    *Good source of: Magnesium (54mg)

    *Foods that are an “excellent source” of a particular nutrient provide 20% or more of the Recommended Daily


    Value. Foods that are a “good source” of a particular nutrient provide between 10 and 20% of the Recommended Daily Value.



    Health benefits and concerns
    Asthma

    Vitamin C, present in fruits and vegetables, is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. This anti-inflammatory activity may influence the development of asthma symptoms. A large preliminary study has shown that young children with asthma experience significantly less wheezing if they eat a diet high in fruits rich in vitamin C.

    Bruising

    Many Americans eat insufficient amounts of foods containing vitamin C; the disease caused by vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, causes easy bruising. While very few people actually have scurvy, even minor deficiencies of vitamin C can increase the incidence of bruising. People who experience easy bruising may want to try eating more fruits and vegetables—common dietary sources of vitamin C.

    Capillary fragility

    Eating plenty of flavonoid- and vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables helps to support the structure of capillaries.

    High homocysteine

    A controlled trial showed that eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables containing folic acid, beta-carotene, and vitamin C effectively lowered homocysteine levels. Healthy people were assigned to either a diet containing a pound of fruits and vegetables per day, or to a diet containing 3 1/2 ounces (99g) of fruits and vegetables per day. After four weeks, those eating the higher amount of fruits and vegetables had an 11 percent lower homocysteine level compared to those eating the lower amount of fruits and vegetables.

    Kidney stones

    Potassium reduces urinary calcium excretion, and people who eat high amounts of dietary potassium appear to be at low risk of forming kidney stones. The best way to increase potassium is to eat fruits and vegetables. The level of potassium in food is much higher than the small amounts found in supplements.

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

    In one survey, researchers gathered information from nearly 400 individuals (half with MS) over three years. They found that consumption of vegetable protein, fruit juice, and foods rich in vitamin C, thiamine, riboflavin, calcium, and potassium correlated with a decreased MS risk.

    Stroke

    Researchers have found an association between diets low in potassium and increased risk of stroke. However, the association of increasing dietary potassium intake and decreasing stroke mortality only occurred in black men and hypertensive men in one study. Others have found an association between increased risk of stroke and the combination of low dietary potassium plus high salt intake. Increasing dietary potassium has lowered blood pressure in humans, which by itself should reduce the risk of stroke; however, some of the protective effect of potassium appears to extend beyond its ability to lower blood pressure. Maintaining a high potassium intake is best achieved by eating fruits and vegetables.

    Health benefits and concerns for vegetables
    Many health benefits and concerns associated with this food are applicable to other vegetables. Read about health benefits and concerns for vegetables for a full description.


    and some more from another site:

    Health Benefits: Radishes are moderately high in Vitamin C and contain properties that appear to be beneficial for symptoms of colds, flu, fever, cough, respiratory problems, and digestive disorders. For digestive problems, put a handful of radish leaves in boiling water, cover, and let sit for about 20 minutes. Strain, add honey to taste and drink as a tea. For colds, flu, and the associated symptoms, grate one radish and mix with honey to taste. Let this mixture stand for 10 hours in a dark place. Take 2 teaspoons three times a day as a cough syrup.





    [This Message was Edited on 10/07/2002]
  2. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    Just found this, I will come back & add to it if I find more..............this is all specific to red radishes

    Nutritional Highlights
    Radishes, 1 cup (88g) (raw, sliced)
    Calories: 23
    Protein: 0.69g
    Carbohydrate: 4.2g
    Total Fat: 0.63g
    Fiber: 1.85g
    *Excellent source of: Vitamin C (26.4mg)

    Daikon, 1 radish, 7 inches (17cm) long (oriental radish, raw)
    Calories: 61
    Protein: 2.03g
    Carbohydrate: 13.9g
    Total Fat: 0.34g
    Fiber: 5.4g
    *Excellent source of: Potassium (767mg), Vitamin C (74mg), and Folate (95mcg)
    *Good source of: Magnesium (54mg)

    *Foods that are an “excellent source” of a particular nutrient provide 20% or more of the Recommended Daily


    Value. Foods that are a “good source” of a particular nutrient provide between 10 and 20% of the Recommended Daily Value.



    Health benefits and concerns
    Asthma

    Vitamin C, present in fruits and vegetables, is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. This anti-inflammatory activity may influence the development of asthma symptoms. A large preliminary study has shown that young children with asthma experience significantly less wheezing if they eat a diet high in fruits rich in vitamin C.

    Bruising

    Many Americans eat insufficient amounts of foods containing vitamin C; the disease caused by vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, causes easy bruising. While very few people actually have scurvy, even minor deficiencies of vitamin C can increase the incidence of bruising. People who experience easy bruising may want to try eating more fruits and vegetables—common dietary sources of vitamin C.

    Capillary fragility

    Eating plenty of flavonoid- and vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables helps to support the structure of capillaries.

    High homocysteine

    A controlled trial showed that eating a diet high in fruits and vegetables containing folic acid, beta-carotene, and vitamin C effectively lowered homocysteine levels. Healthy people were assigned to either a diet containing a pound of fruits and vegetables per day, or to a diet containing 3 1/2 ounces (99g) of fruits and vegetables per day. After four weeks, those eating the higher amount of fruits and vegetables had an 11 percent lower homocysteine level compared to those eating the lower amount of fruits and vegetables.

    Kidney stones

    Potassium reduces urinary calcium excretion, and people who eat high amounts of dietary potassium appear to be at low risk of forming kidney stones. The best way to increase potassium is to eat fruits and vegetables. The level of potassium in food is much higher than the small amounts found in supplements.

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

    In one survey, researchers gathered information from nearly 400 individuals (half with MS) over three years. They found that consumption of vegetable protein, fruit juice, and foods rich in vitamin C, thiamine, riboflavin, calcium, and potassium correlated with a decreased MS risk.

    Stroke

    Researchers have found an association between diets low in potassium and increased risk of stroke. However, the association of increasing dietary potassium intake and decreasing stroke mortality only occurred in black men and hypertensive men in one study. Others have found an association between increased risk of stroke and the combination of low dietary potassium plus high salt intake. Increasing dietary potassium has lowered blood pressure in humans, which by itself should reduce the risk of stroke; however, some of the protective effect of potassium appears to extend beyond its ability to lower blood pressure. Maintaining a high potassium intake is best achieved by eating fruits and vegetables.

    Health benefits and concerns for vegetables
    Many health benefits and concerns associated with this food are applicable to other vegetables. Read about health benefits and concerns for vegetables for a full description.


    and some more from another site:

    Health Benefits: Radishes are moderately high in Vitamin C and contain properties that appear to be beneficial for symptoms of colds, flu, fever, cough, respiratory problems, and digestive disorders. For digestive problems, put a handful of radish leaves in boiling water, cover, and let sit for about 20 minutes. Strain, add honey to taste and drink as a tea. For colds, flu, and the associated symptoms, grate one radish and mix with honey to taste. Let this mixture stand for 10 hours in a dark place. Take 2 teaspoons three times a day as a cough syrup.





    [This Message was Edited on 10/07/2002]
  3. psigrl

    psigrl New Member