Research in Seattle

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by AnnG, Aug 13, 2003.

  1. AnnG

    AnnG New Member

    They had a teaser to advertise the news that said, "New meds for fibromyalgia, a very painful disorder!" They played it all day. They are doing research at Seattle's Swedish Hospital on two new meds: Milnacipran and Pregabalin (I might have spelling wrong). So far, the research patients love both meds! If anyone lives in the area, the number is:206-386-3207, in case you want to participate in the med trials.

    What pleased me was the exposure on TV and the fact that they didn't trivialize our symptoms.
  2. judywhit

    judywhit New Member

    perhaps i will give them a call. i am near the seattle area.
    Jw
  3. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    We all appreciate the info.

    Love, Mikie
  4. AnnG

    AnnG New Member

    ....has heard of these meds, please let me know. I am now curious!
  5. RhainyC

    RhainyC New Member

    Once I get my proper DX though. Thankfully I have found a doc nearby that will DX me, but not treat me. <SigH> But I am hoping my pcp will keep treating me after the DX either concurs or disagrees with my therapist's DX.

    Seattle is close enough to drive to if I decide to join...and am able.

    Blessings,
    RhainyC
  6. tedebear

    tedebear New Member

    Just looked-up the two drugs posted earlier 08/14/03 09:52 AM

    Somewhat controversial I guess. Read what I found.

    Pregabalin

    Pregabalin is a pain reliever manufactured by Pfizer. In clinical trials of Pregabalin there were reports of mice developing tumors. This led Pregabalin manufacturer to cancel further studies of the drug in humans. Despite these serious Pregabalin adverse effects the drug continues to be studied and Pfizer is planning on submitting a New Drug Application to the FDA by the end of 2002.

    Milnacipran

    A review of the studies comparing milnacipran, placebo and active comparator antidepressants provides clear-cut evidence of its efficacy in both severe and moderate depression in hospitalized and community settings. Meta-analyses of the original data of controlled trials involving 1032 patients, comparing milnacipran with imipramine or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), show that milnacipran provides antidepressant efficacy similar to that of imipramine and significantly superior to that of the SSRIs. An analysis of a database of over 3300 patients shows that both the general and cardiovascular tolerability of milnacipran are superior to those of the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) with fewer cholinergic side-effects.