Retroviruses Can't Jump Species

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by jasminetee, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. jasminetee

    jasminetee Member

    At least that's what this article seems to be saying the NIH believed.
    jenbooks posted this link in another thread. I wanted to make it a main topic:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov//pubmed/7595205

    jenbooks has a lot to say about this article and I agree with her.

    Try reading just the first and last quotes and then remember they're talking about using Mouse Retrovirus which is what XMRV is and I think it will be more clear. Also, in vitro means in the lab and in vivo means live.

    I just cannot believe this. This was done by the National Institute of Health the NIH which oversees the CDC! This article was written in 1995.

    Quotes from the article written in 1995:

    "Type C retroviruses endogenous to various nonprimate species can infect human cells in vitro, yet the transmission of these viruses to humans is restricted."

    "Here we report a novel mechanism of complement-mediated type C retrovirus inactivation that is initiated by the binding of "natural antibody" [Ab] (anti-alpha-galactosyl Ab) to the carbohydrate epitope Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc-R expressed on the retroviral envelope."

    "Complement-mediated inactivation of amphotropic retroviral particles was found to be restricted to human and other Old World primate sera, which parallels the presence of anti-alpha-galactosyl natural Ab. Blockade or depletion of anti-alpha-galactosyl Ab in human serum prevented inactivation of both amphotropic and ecotropic MURINE retroviruses." -- MURINE means MOUSE as in XMRV- Xenotropic MURINE Lukemia Virus-Related Virus. Holy Smokes!!!!


    "Similarly, retrovirus was not killed by New World primate serum except in the presence of exogenous anti-alpha-galactosyl Ab. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that the alpha-galactosyl epitope was expressed on the surface of amphotropic and ecotropic retroviruses, and Western blot analysis further localized this epitope to the retroviral envelope glycoprotein gp70."


    So it seems that as long as they also used "exogenous anti-alpha-galactosyl Ab" they thought that the retrovirus wouldn't jump species.

    "Finally, down-regulation of this epitope on the surface of MURINE RETROVIRAL particle producer cells rendered them, as well as the particles liberated from these cells, resistant to inactivation by human serum complement."


    "Our data suggest that anti-alpha-galactosyl Ab may provide a barrier for the horizontal transmission of retrovirus from species that express the alpha-galactosyl epitope to humans and to other Old World primates."

    "Further, these data provide a mechanism for the generation of complement-resistant retroviral vectors for in vivo gene therapy applications where exposure to human complement is UNAVOIDABLE." O_O


    I think this article might be the smoking gun.

    tee




    [This Message was Edited on 10/19/2009]
  2. jasminetee

    jasminetee Member

    I'm glad to see your comments.

    lum- I'm going to have to wait 'til later in the day to go through your post but I can't wait to do it. I just know it's loaded with more amazing info.

    The link to the article is the third line down in my post above.

    I'm going through your post now. Yes, this does link with what the microbiologist is saying in that radio show you uploaded to YouTube. Thanks so much for doing that.


    My mind's blown these days, how 'bout you all?

    zero.dip- I am going to try to post the relevant bits here that may help people see what I'm saying:

    "Type C retroviruses..." -- XMRV is a type C Retrovirus I do believe.

    "...endogenous to various nonprimate species can infect human cells in vitro..." -- Enodogenous to (mice for example) can infect human cells in the lab.

    "...yet the transmission of these viruses to humans is restricted."

    "...prevented inactivation of both amphotropic and ecotropic MURINE retroviruses." -- MURINE means MOUSE as in XMRV- Xenotropic MURINE Lukemia Virus-Related Virus. Holy Smokes!!!!

    "Similarly, retrovirus was not killed by New World primate serum except in the presence of exogenous anti-alpha-galactosyl Ab...." -- The Retrovirus is killed in primates when a certain substance is present.

    ""Our data suggest that anti-alpha-galactosyl Ab may provide a barrier for the horizontal transmission of retrovirus from species that express the alpha-galactosyl epitope to humans and to other Old World primates."

    ""Further, these data provide a mechanism for the generation of complement-resistant retroviral vectors for in vivo gene therapy applications where exposure to human complement is UNAVOIDABLE." O_O


    ----- I read that as saying that the NIH feels that it is safe to put mouse retroviruses into their therapies for humans.

    Thank you jenbooks for originally posting this article on here from PubMed.


    Also, I don't see this as a conspiracy at all. Cover-up? Yes! What happened with HIV does look like a conspiracy though.


    [This Message was Edited on 10/19/2009]
  3. jasminetee

    jasminetee Member

    In another thread jenbooks wrote:

    “I do know that when they used murine leukemia virus as a vector in gene therapy, a vector that (modified) has been available all this time (decades), that the bubble babies given the gene therapy did develop cancer. The reason, they found out, is that the promoter sequences on the virus, if they landed next to an oncogene, switched it on.

    Now they've removed those promoter sequences--at least for gene therapy.

    It seems when viruses jump species (or are "jumped" by scientists modifying them, and yeah, I'm convinced that could easily be the case), they prove extremely virulent to the new species at first. So XMRV may not just be a catalyst. Who knows. We'll find out in time."

    Luminescent--- I just saw that video where the newspaperman is interviewed. If only he were right. ME is going to be a lot harder to overcome than just going on vacation and becoming introspective.

    Thank you for posting the info you did from Cheney's site about how the CDC couldn't afford plane tickets!
    [This Message was Edited on 10/19/2009]
  4. jenbooks13

    jenbooks13 New Member

    I was speculating but I checked with a scientist I trust today and I'm probably wrong. I still find the "coincidence" alarming of us working on MLV and MLV jumping species so to speak but the fact is that XMRV must've come from mice. Mice carry lots of viruses. Could have been hanging around for a while. A variant, a polymorphism of MLV. Did not cause pathology in mice. But it jumped species to us. And we were vulnerable. This could have occurred over a long time.

    I have a lot of questions and I'll get back to you when I know more.
    \
    Teekjay--yes they DO use MLV in gene therapy. They cured bubble babies that way. You have to use viruses, though you take out their replication sequences and you try to take out anything that would be dangerous, immunogenic, etc about them--to get a gene into the genome of the stem cell, so you can cure genetic diseases.

    They've run into problems, it's a field that's slowly having successes, but they've run into serious problems at times, underestimating the dance btw the immune system (ours) and viruses.[This Message was Edited on 10/19/2009]
  5. jasminetee

    jasminetee Member

    jenbooks, thanks for explaining that further. Doesn't this look like the smoking gun? Cool that you have a scientist to ask. :)

    fredt, that's exactly what I'm thinking.
  6. AuntTammie

    AuntTammie New Member

    fascinating and frightening stuff.....will be interested to learn more
  7. spacee

    spacee Member

    Thanks all for posting.

    Spacee