Salt/C method has changed bit

Discussion in 'Lyme Disease Archives' started by victoria, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. victoria

    victoria New Member

    Apparently the Salt/C protocol has changed a bit. Because it has changed and there is so much misinformation "out there", the ebook has been republished with the new updated/refined protocol info based on many lymies doing this over the past 6 years. I have not tried Salt/C or read the new book, fwiw, just trying to help keep this board updated as to alternatives.

    It is not the same as what was available previously at lymephotos. You can read more about this at
    http://www.fettnet.com/lymestrategies/welcome.htm
    http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/lymestrategies/

    Cited below is a study re a slightly higher salt blood level inhibiting Lyme/Bb:

    Wien Klin Wochenschr. 1998 Dec 23;110(24):863-5.

    Growth Of Infectious And Non-Infectious B. Burgdorferi At Different Salt Concentrations.

    Elias A, Bono JL, Tilly K, Rosa P.
    Laboratory of Microbial Structure and Function,
    Rocky Mountain Laboratories,
    National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Hamilton, Montana, USA. aelias@atlas.niaid.nih.gov

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, grows in vitro in modified Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK-H) medium. We have studied the effect of increased osmotic strength of culture media on growth of infectious and non-infectious B. burgdorferi strains B31 and N40. Relatively small increases in the NaCl concentration of the medium significantly inhibited growth in infectious as well as non-infectious strains. Growth of low passage, infectious clone B31-4a was more sensitive to increased NaCl concentrations than high passage, non-infectious clone B31-a. Growth of two infectious N40 strains, one low passage (N40-Lp) and one high passage (N40-P31) was more resistant to increased NaCl concentration than growth of infectious B31-4a. Osmotic strength is an important physical parameter for growth of B. burgdorferi in vitro and could influence its ability to adapt and to establish an infection within ticks and mammals.

    PMID: 10048166 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10048166