SARS

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by mike9318, Apr 12, 2003.

  1. mike9318

    mike9318 New Member

    it seems in toronto it's spreading quite fast contrary to what i read in the news. when i was asked a list of questions i answered a perfect 10 for sars. they said "well i don't think you have it come anyway". i'm not posting to put anyone down but rather seeing if it's like that in the states. since my therapy was changed to a hotel i would also like advice from everyone here. should i contact the hotel and explain that i don't think i have sars but do have every symptom. would this be overdoing it?

    thx for reply
  2. Plantscaper

    Plantscaper New Member

    We have some friends that were in HongKong, not long ago, before it was publicly discussed...Would like to know if people, also, could be carriers of it, but not come down with the disease?

    If you are no more sicker than you were before this disease was publicly annouced, it is probable that symptoms could be similar, but differ in degree, maybe? I have heard it is somewhat like the flu, but it must be much worse in degree..
  3. Notonline

    Notonline New Member

    Copied this from the CDC site for anyone that wants more info...always good to stay informed.
    --------------------------------------------------


    Symptoms of SARS

    In general, SARS begins with a fever greater than 100.4°F [>38.0°C]. Other symptoms may include headache, an overall feeling of discomfort, and body aches. Some people also experience mild respiratory symptoms. After 2 to 7 days, SARS patients may develop a dry cough and have trouble breathing.

    How SARS Spreads

    Public health experts think that SARS is spread by close contact between people. SARS is most likely spread when someone sick with the disease coughs droplets into the air and someone else breathes them in. It is possible that SARS also can spread more broadly through the air or from touching objects that have become contaminated. To find out more about SARS, go to CDC's SARS Web site and the WHO's SARS Web site. The Web sites are updated daily.

    Who is at risk for SARS

    Cases of SARS continue to be reported mainly among people who have had direct close contact with an infected person, such as those sharing a household with a SARS patient and health care workers who did not use infection control procedures while taking care of a SARS patient. In the United States, there is no indication of community spread at this time. CDC continues to monitor this situation very closely.

    What you should do to protect yourself

    CDC has issued interim guidelines for patients with suspected SARS in the healthcare setting and in households. These guidelines may change as we learn more about SARS. If you get sick with the symptoms described above and have been in close contact with someone who might have SARS, see your health care provider and follow the guidelines below.

    GUIDELINES

    If you think you (or someone in your family) might have SARS, you should:

    Consult a health care provider as soon as possible.
    Cover your mouth and nose with tissue when coughing or sneezing. If you have a surgical mask, wear it during close contact with other people. A mask can reduce the number of droplets coughed into the air.
    If you have SARS and are being cared for at home, you should:
    Follow the instructions given by your health care provider.
    Limit your activities outside the home during this 10-day period. For example, do not go to work, school, or public areas.
    Wash your hands often and well, especially after you have blown your nose.
    Cover your mouth and nose with tissue when you sneeze or cough.
    If possible, wear a surgical mask when around other people in your home. If you can't wear a mask, the members of your household should wear one when they are around you.
    Don't share silverware, towels, or bedding with anyone in your home until these items have been washed with soap and hot water.
    Clean surfaces (counter or tabletops, door knobs, bathroom fixtures, etc.) that have been contaminated by body fluids (sweat, saliva, mucous, or even vomit or urine) from the SARS patient with a household disinfectant used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Wear disposable gloves during all cleaning activities. Throw these out when you are done. Do not reuse them.
    Follow these instructions for 10 days after your fever and respiratory symptoms have gone away.
    If you are caring for someone at home who has SARS, you should:
    Be sure that the person with SARS has seen a health care provider and is following instructions for medication and care.
    Be sure that all members of your household are washing their hands frequently with soap and hot water or using alcohol-based hand wash.
    Wear disposable gloves if you have direct contact with body fluids of a SARS patient. However, the wearing of gloves is not a substitute for good hand hygiene. After contact with body fluids of a SARS patient, remove the gloves, throw them out, and wash your hands. Do not wash or reuse the gloves.
    Encourage the person with SARS to cover their mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. If possible, the person with SARS should wear a surgical mask during close contact with other people in the home. If the person with SARS cannot wear a surgical mask, other members of the household should wear one when in the room with that person.
    Do not use silverware, towels, bedding, clothing, or other items that have been used by the person with SARS until these items have been washed with soap and hot water.
    Clean surfaces (counter or tabletops, door knobs, bathroom fixtures, etc.) that have been contaminated by body fluids (sweat, saliva, mucous, or even vomit or urine) with a household disinfectant used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Wear disposable gloves during all cleaning activities. Throw these out when done. Do not reuse them.
    Follow these instructions for 10 days after the sick person's fever and respiratory symptoms have gone away.
    If you develop a fever or respiratory symptoms, contact your health care provider immediately and tell him or her that you have had close contact with a SARS patient.
  4. layinglow

    layinglow New Member

    For more info you can go to the WHO website. It lists each country, number of cases, recoveries, and deaths.
    I was quite suprised to see that after China, in cases, the U.S. is 2nd, and then Canada 3rd. This certainly has not been portrayed in the media.
    LL
    [This Message was Edited on 04/12/2003]
  5. mike9318

    mike9318 New Member

    sorry i guess i should have wrote more info. the hospital physio/rertoration dept has temp moved to a hotel. when i was asked a list of questions regarding sars i answered yes to almost all of them. i have the symptoms and i may have come into contact with people who have the virus. now i'm thinking what if i did or do have it? what if someone else has it and these people are saying "it's ok i don't think you have it come to the hotel anyway, you prob have the flu". is that fair to the tourist who pay to sleep there? what about the executives who book the hotel for meetings? should i contact the hotel manager and tell him/her that these people are doing a bad job screening and may be putting the hotel guests at risk. i don't want to do that as i will be opening future headaches for myself(i'm sure physio dept will get revenge on me for doing that). at the same note this is a hotel that people like walmart may book and sleep or hold a meeting there(it's not a cheap place very expensive), is it fair to have these people exposed to sars? should i complain to the hotel mngmnt or hr dept or just shut my mouth and pretend nothing happened?