Sensitive GI system

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Cobi, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. Cobi

    Cobi New Member

    Hi,

    A while back, I took horse radish juice for detoxing, and it wounded my intestines, I haven't been the same since. I now can't eat anything spicy, coarse or acidic, which limits the vitamins and foods I can eat. I saw a GI doc and he said it's probably IBS. It's not IBS, it's my intestines not being able to heal themselves from the irritation.
    I think it is inflammation related. The only problem is that anti inflammatory supplements like turmeric and ginger, irritate it.
    It could also be related to some viral or bacterial infection in my gut which is slowing down the healing process.

    Anyone have any ideas?

    Thanks,

    Cobi
  2. elliespad

    elliespad Member

    Glutamine is the first thing that came to mind, also called L-Glutamine. Is an Amino Acid. Here is some info.
    _________________________________________________________

    Glutamine (Powder)

    Description


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the circulation. It is a primary fuel for rapidly dividing cells (including intestinal cells which slough off every three days or so), and plays a key role in the transport of nitrogen between organs. There is considerable evidence that glutamine can enhance the barrier function of the gut against viral, bacterial, and food antigen invaders (Hall JC et al. Br J Surg 1996 Mar;83(3):305-312). Glutamine deficiency can occur during periods of metabolic stress, which has led to the reclassification of glutamine as a conditionally essential amino acid. Experiments with various animal models have demonstrated that supplementation of glutamine can result in better nitrogen homeostasis, with conservation of skeletal muscle (ibid).

    Clinical Applications/Research
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Clinical applications include intestinal permeability (leaky gut), food allergies, acid reflux, Crohn’s disease, ulcers, nausea, anorexia, and achlorhydria. General indications for high dose glutamine include repairing intestinal NSAIDS/drug damage, and/or any condition of the bowel (especially small bowel), that require synthesis and healing of intestinal cells. Glutamine metabolism by the ileum and colon is impaired in Crohn's disease, and supplementation is recommended (Sido B et al. Langenbecks Arch Chir Suppl Kongressbd 1997;114:653-656). Food Allergies: Many foods cause immune reactions because macromolecules (large, undigested food proteins) pass through leaks in the intestinal lining. Glutamine’s ability to protect the barrier function of the gut can reduce the incidence of immune activation. SOME KNOWN PROPERTIES AND FUNCTIONS OF GLUTAMINE INCLUDE: - enhance gut immune function - improve cell function - stimulate intestinal mucosal growth - reduce infection rate - inhibit bacterial invasion from the gut - reduce hospital stays - reduce severity of methotrexate-induced enterocolitis - increase tissue healing - acid-base regulator - important precursor of nucleic acids - important precursor of glutathione, a potent antioxidant and detoxifier - increase Natural Killer cell activity (currently being tested in AIDS patients) - increase normal tissue but not tumor tissue (delivers chemotherapy to breast cancer cells in animal studies) - decrease catabolic stress and protein loss - enhance healing of ulcers - no toxicity shown Judy Schubert, MD RD & Nancy Erlich. The Ultimate Nutrient Glutamine. 1994. Avery Publ Garden City NY; Souba W. Intestinal Glutamine Metabolism and Nutrition. J Nutr Biochem1993;4:2-9 Japanese scientists discovered glutamine as an antiulcer drug and noted that it prevented ulcers in rats given aspirin (Okabe, S, Takeuchi K, Honda K, Takagi K. Effects of Acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) plus L-glutamine and L-glutamine on healing of chronic gastric ulcer in the rat. Digestion 1976;14:85-88). Glutamine enhances chemotherapy and reduces toxicity (Klimberg, V., M.D., et al, Glutamine Facilitates Chemotherapy While Reducing Toxicity. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 1992;16(6):83S-87S). Glutamine protects the host from microbial invasion and associated infection (Ann Surg 1991;214(4):385-93).

    Suggested Dosage
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Glutamine powder provides for higher doses of glutamine at a more reasonable cost. Glutamine supplementation may be of greater benefit when given in higher gram doses (up to 9-16 grams in some severe cases).

  3. yjswan

    yjswan New Member

    My suggestion is to try another doctor. The one you saw pretty much wrote you off without a thorough investigation of your problem. You probably need a colonoscopy to diagnose what's going on and then proper treatment can be prescribed.

    Good luck and God bless,
    Yvonne
  4. elliespad

    elliespad Member

    I'm wondering if you already had kidney, stomack or intestinal disorder, or if you exceeded the recommended amount? At approx. what dose did this damage occur. I am curious as my daughter uses a LOT of fresh horseradish.

    This is listed under "Side Effects and Cautions" for the plant, Horseradish.

    Consuming large amounts of horseradish may cause vomiting and diarrhea. Because horseradish irritates mucous membranes, young children and people with kidney, stomach, or intestinal disorders should consume it in limited amounts only.

    It also states under "How Much to Take",

    The freshly grated root can be eaten in the amount of 1/2-1 teaspoon three times per day. Horseradish tincture is also available and can be used in the amount of 2-3 ml three times per day.

  5. Cobi

    Cobi New Member

    Thanks for all the replies.
    I've tried, glutamine, NAC and fiber. Most fiber makes it worse or doesn't help
    I took horse radish from a jar, and using cheese cloth I strained it into a cup and drank. I don't remember how much.
    Bottom line, more is not necessary better. Always start low and go slow and listen to your body.
    I think what happened is that the horse radish juice irritated my mucous membranes, and they haven't healed for some reason. Its either due to poor wound healing, inflammation, or a bacterial/viral infections.

    The crazy part of all this is that whenever my GI gets irritated, by taking a food that doesn't agree with me, my gums recede more. Sounds weird, but I see it happening and I have no idea what to do about it.


    Cobi
  6. charlenef

    charlenef New Member

    GAUCATONGA AND DGL LICORICE ROOT IVE BEEN TAKING THEM FOR 8 MONTH BE FORE THAT I COULDNT EAT ANYTHING ILL TRY TO BUMP SOME INFO ON IT FROM ANOTHER POST FROM LUKRO ON STOMACH MEDS
    [This Message was Edited on 01/14/2007]
  7. Cobi

    Cobi New Member

    Thanks Charlene and Mike for the ideas.
    Charlene, were can I get Gaucatonga? Is raintree the only place that has it? Does it commonly go by other names?

    Cobi
  8. charlenef

    charlenef New Member

    THERE ARE OTHER NAMES FOR IT BUT I DONT KNOW THEM THE DGL LICORICE ROOT COATS YOUR INTESTINES SO I HIGHLY RECCOMEND THAT YOU ORDER IT WITH EITHER GUM GUAR OR GAUCATONGA DID YOU READ THE INFO ON THE OTHER POST? THE DR TOLD ME GAUCATONGA WORKS BETTER BUT YOU CAN TRY EITHER ONE CHARLENE
  9. charlenef

    charlenef New Member






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    charlenef



    [ edit | delete ] heartburn 12/27/06 07:23 AM

    I HAVE SAID THIS BEFORE BUT ANYONE THAT WANT TO GET OFF DRUGS FOR ACID REFLUX YOU CAN TAKE DGL( CHEWABLES )LICORICE ROOT AND GAUCATONGA YOU NEED TO TAKE THEN FOR ABOUT A MONTH WITH YOUR SCRIPT OTHERWISE YOU WILL GET ACID REBOUND(MORE ACID) THE DGL HAS THINGS TAKEN OUT OF IT SO IT DOESNT HAVE SIDE EFFECTS LIKE RAISING BLOODPRESSURE ILL COPY AND PASTE SOME THINGS OFF THE WEB CHARLENE


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    charlenef



    [ edit | delete ] GUACATONGA 12/27/06 07:31 AM




    Family: Flacourtiaceae
    Genus: Casearia
    Species: sylvestris
    Synonyms: Samyda parviflora, Casearia parviflora, Anavinga samyda
    Common Names: guacatonga, guassatonga, wild coffee, burro-kaa, café-bravo, cafeiillo, café silvestre, congonhas-de-bugre, corta-lengua, crack-open, dondequiera, erva-de-bugre, erva de pontada, guayabillo, mahajo, papelite, pau de lagarto, piraquina, raton, sarnilla, ucho caspi
    Parts Used: Bark, Leaves


    From The Healing Power of Rainforest Herbs:


    GUACATONGA
    HERBAL PROPERTIES AND ACTIONS
    Main Actions Other Actions Standard Dosage
    protects stomach
    blocks pain signals
    Leaves
    prevents ulcers
    neutralizes venom
    Infusion: 1/2 cup 2-3
    kills cancer cells
    kills viruses
    times daily
    slows tumor growth
    cleanses blood
    Capsules: 1-2 g twice daily
    relieves pain
    stops bleeding

    heals wounds


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Guacatonga grows as a shrub or small tree usually 2 or 3 meters tall, but sometimes grows up to 10 meters in undisturbed areas of the Amazon. In the clay soils of the Amazon, the plant has adapted for nutrient absorption and support by forming extensive lateral roots that are white, stiff, and covered with a corky bark. The tree produces small white, cream, or greenish flowers (which smell like a mixture of honey and urine) crowded on short stalks on the leaf axils. After flowering it produces small fruits, 3-4 mm in diameter, which split open to reveal three brown seeds covered with a red-to-orange aril. Guacatonga grows wild throughout the tropics, adapting to both forests and plains. It is native to Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America (including Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Uruguay, and Bolivia).

    TRIBAL AND HERBAL MEDICINE USES

    Guacatonga has a rich history in herbal medicine systems in nearly every tropical country where it grows. The Karajá Indians in Brazil prepare a bark maceration to treat diarrhea; the Shipibo-Conibo Indians of Peru use a decoction of the bark for diarrhea, chest colds and flu. Other Indian tribes in Brazil mash the roots or seeds of guacatonga to treat wounds and leprosy topically. Indigenous peoples throughout the Amazon rainforest have long used guacatonga as a snakebite remedy. A leaf decoction is brewed that is applied topically and also taken internally. The same jungle remedy is used topically for bee stings and other insect bites. This native use found its way out of the rainforest and into current herbal medicine practices in cities and villages in South America. It has been validated by scientists in the last several years who documented the leaf extract as capable of neutralizing several types of bee and snake venoms.

    Guacatonga has a long history of use in Brazilian herbal medicine, documented in early folk medicine books as an antiseptic and wound healer for skin diseases (in 1939), as a topical pain-reliever (in 1941), and as an anti-ulcer drug (in 1958). It is currently used in Brazilian herbal medicine systems as a blood purifier, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral to treat rheumatism, syphilis, herpes, stomach and skin ulcers, edema, fevers of all kinds, diarrhea, and as an topical pain-reliever. It is also employed topically for burns, wounds, rashes, and such skin disorders as eczema and . The natural herbal remedy calls for 20 grams of dried leaves infused in 1 liter of water; quarter-cup amounts are taken orally 2-3 times daily.

    The plant is also a popular herbal remedy employed in Bolivian herbal medicine, where it is considered to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, reduce stomach acid and prevent ulcers, stop bleeding and heal wounds. There it is used to treat skin diseases, cancer, stomach ulcers, snakebite and bee stings, herpes, and in dental antiseptic mouthwash products.

    PLANT CHEMICALS

    The chemical makeup of guacatonga is quite complex. Scientists conducting the antivenin research discovered that the leaves and twigs of the plant contain a phytochemical called lapachol. This is the well known and studied anticancerous/antifungal compound from which another rainforest plant, pau d'arco (Tabebuia impetiginosa), gained much renown. (Pau d'arco is also featured in this book.) While other researchers have been studying the anticancerous and antitumorous properties of guacatonga, a completely different set of phytochemicals has fueled their interest. These compounds, called clerodane diterpenes, are found abundantly in guacatonga and some have been patented as antisarcomic agents. Clerodane diterpenes have been documented with a wide range of biological activities ranging from insect antifeedants, to antitumorous, anticancerous, and antibiotic agents, to HIV replication inhibitors. Some of the clerodane diterpenes documented in guacatonga are novel chemicals which scientists have named casearins (A thru S). Other chemicals in guacatonga include caprionic acid, casearia clerodane I thru VI, casearvestrin A thru C, hesperitin, lapachol, and vicenin.

    BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES AND CLINICAL RESEARCH

    The research on guacatonga's anticancerous properties began in 1988 by Japanese researchers from the Tokyo College of Pharmacy and Pharmacognosy. They published one preliminary trial in 1988 on their discovery of these novel clerodane diterpenes and their anticancerous and antitumorous activities. The study indicated that an ethanol extract of the leaf showed strong antitumorous activity in laboratory mice with sarcomas. As soon as they made this discovery, they rushed to patent it, filing a Japanese patent for the casearin chemicals they'd discovered as new antitumorous agents. They published a follow-up study in 1990, again reporting their results from injecting mice with sarcomas with an ethanol extract of guacatonga leaves (100 mg per gram of body weight) and confirming their previous findings. They then tested individual casearins against various human cancer cell lines and published two more studies in 1991 and 1992. These studies reported newly isolated casearin chemicals and their antitumorous and anticancerous actions against various cancer tumor cells. Oddly, the Japanese researchers have not published any further studies and, since they had already filed patents, other research groups have not been forthcoming in funding research dollars on these patented antitumorous plant chemicals.

    In 2002, however, a well-known research group in North Carolina discovered three new casearins in the leaves and stems of guacatonga that the Japanese had not (and, obviously, hadn't patented). They named the new chemicals casearvestrin A, B and C, and published their first study in February, 2002, stating: "All three compounds displayed promising bioactivity, both in cytotoxicity assays against a panel of tumor cell lines and in antifungal assays . . ." Their research tested the new plant chemicals against human lung, colon and ovarian tumor cells and indicated all three compounds had toxicity to cancer cells in very small amounts. This research was supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NCI) and performed by a non-profit biotech company, a large pharmaceutical company and a major university. The NCI has also performed research in-house on clerodane diterpenoids found in another Casearia plant species documenting the antitumor properties of its novel diterpenoids and another university research group has documented the anticancerous properties of this class of chemicals in a Casearia plant from the Madagascar rainforest as well. It will be interesting to see if this diversified group will actually develop these chemicals into new effective chemotherapeutic agents; their research is ongoing.

    All other research on the chemicals and activities of guacatonga has been performed by Brazilian research groups over the years. The first published toxicity study with rats indicated no toxicity with an ethanol extract of the leaves at 1840 mg per kg. This research group, at the University of Sao Paulo, studied the anti-ulcer properties of the plant (based on its long history of use as an effective herbal remedy for ulcers). They published two studies confirming these benefits. The first study, with rats (in 1990), showed that a crude leaf extract reduced the volume of gastric secretion by 42%, but had little effect on pH. The extract also prevented lab-induced acute gastric mucosal injury which was equivalent to the antiulcer drug cimetidine (Tagamet®). Ten years later they published a second rat study, documenting that a crude leaf extract protected the stomach lining without changing gastric pH and sped healing of acetic acid-induced chronic ulcers and H. pylori ulcers.

    Another Brazilian researcher documented that a bark-and-leaf infusion demonstrated pain relieving and mild anti-inflammatory properties in mice. A university researcher followed up on the anti-inflammatory research, publishing in her dissertation that an extract of the leaves was as effective against inflammation in mice as the NSAID drugs Prioxicam® and Meloxicam®. Leaf extracts have also been shown by two research groups to be active against common food poisoning bacteria strains, Bacillus cerus and B. subtilis, but inactive against such other common bacteria as Staphylococcus, Streptoccoccus, and E. coli.

    CURRENT PRACTICAL USES

    It will be interesting to see what happens with guacatonga's ongoing cancer research - especially with sarcomas. These types of tumors typically grow very quickly, are resistant to many of the approved cancer drugs, and represent a bleak prognosis for most cancer patients. In the meantime, guacatonga is considered a safe plant and a great natural herbal remedy for ulcers, inflammation, and pain, and will continue to be used as a snakebite remedy throughout the Amazon jungles by the indigenous peoples. Although not widely available in the U.S. market yet, hopefully as more people learn of its beneficial uses, the market demand for it will increase.



    GUACATONGA PLANT SUMMARY
    Main Preparation Method: infusion or capsules
    Main Actions (in order):
    anticancerous, antitumorous, antiulcerous, antivenin, anti-inflammatory

    Main Uses:

    for cancer (sarcoma, carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma)
    for stomach disorders (ulcers, acid reflux, indigestion, dyspepsia, stomachache)
    as an antivenin for snake, spider, and bee bites and stings
    as a topical analgesic (pain-reliever) and anti-inflammatory for skin diseases, rashes, and wounds
    as a blood purifier and general detoxification
    Properties/Actions Documented by Research:
    analgesic (pain-reliever), antacid, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anticancerous, antifungal, antitumorous, antiulcerous, antivenin, gastroprotective (protects the gastric tract)
    Other Properties/Actions Documented by Traditional Use:
    anesthetic, antihemorrhagic (reduces bleeding), antimutagenic (cellular protector), antiseptic, antiviral, astringent, blood cleanser, detoxifier, digestive stimulant, wound healer

    Cautions: none






    Traditional Preparation: Twenty grams of dried leaves are infused in a liter of water and quarter-cup amounts are taken 2-3 times daily with meals as a digestive and anti-ulcer aid. Since most of the chemicals are water soluble, powdered leaves in tablets or capsules (1-2 grams twice daily) can be substituted if desired. The above infusion can also be used topically for wounds, burns, skin rashes, and as a mouth wash after dental work or tooth extractions.

    Contraindications: None known.
    Drug Interactions: None reported.



    WORLDWIDE ETHNOBOTANICAL USES
    Bolivia for blood cleansing, cancer, dental antiseptic mouthwash, inflammation, insect bites, pain, skin diseases, snakebite, tumors, ulcers, wounds, and to stop bleeding
    Brazil for blood cleansing, diarrhea, chest and body pains, eczema, fevers, flu, herpes, inflammation, leprosy, male sexual stimulant, rheumatism, skin diseases, snakebite, syphilis, wounds
    Colombia for skin diseases, snakebite, ulcers, wounds
    India for snakebite
    Peru for diarrhea
    Elsewhere for leprosy, snakebite, wounds







    The above text has been printed from The Healing Power of Rainforest Herbs by Leslie Taylor, copyrighted © 2005
    All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, including websites, without written permission.

    A complete Technical Data Report is available for this plant.



    † The statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The information contained in this plant database file is intended for education, entertainment and information purposes only. This information is not intended to be used to diagnose, prescribe or replace proper medical care. The plant described herein is not intended to treat, cure, diagnose, mitigate or prevent any disease. Please refer to our Conditions of Use for using this plant database file and web site.



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    Third-Party Published Research on Guacatonga

    All available third-party research on guacatonga can be found at PubMed. A partial listing of the published research on guacatonga is shown below:

    Cytotoxic & Anticancerous Actions:
    Maistro, E. L., et al. “Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of the Casearia sylvestris extract on HTC and V79 cells by the comet assay.” Toxicol. In Vitro. 2004 Jun; 18(3): 337-42.
    Oberlies, N. H., et al. “Novel bioactive clerodane diterpenoids from the leaves and twigs of Casearia sylvestris.” J. Nat. Prod. 2002; 65(2): 95–99.
    Sai Prakash, C. V., et al. “Structure and stereochemistry of new cytotoxic clerodane diterpenoids from the bark of Casearia lucida from the Madagascar rainforest.” J. Nat. Prod. 2002; 65(2): 100-7.
    Beutler, J. A. “Novel cytotoxic diterpenes from Casearia arborea.” J. Nat. Prod. 2000; 63(5): 657-61.
    Almeida, A. “Antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects of extract from Casearia sylvestris: comparative study with Piroxicam and Meloxicam.” Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, University of Sao Paulo (Dissertation, 4/02/99).
    Itokawa, H., et al. “Antitumor substances from South American plants.” J. Pharmacobio. Dyn. 1992; 15(1): S-2-.
    Morita, H., et al. “Structures and cytotoxic activity relationship of casearins, new clerodane diterpenes from Casearia sylvestris Sw.” Chem. Pharm. Bull. (Tokyo) 1991 Dec; 39(3): 693–97.
    Itokawa, H., et al. “New antitumor principles, casearins A–F, for Casearia sylvestris Sw. (Flacourtiaceae).” Chem. Pharm. Bull. (Tokyo) 1990; 38(12): 3384–88.
    Itokawa, H., et al. “Isolation of diterpenes as antitumor agents from plants.” Patent—Japan Kokai Tokyo Koho–01 1989; 149, 779: 6pp.
    Itokawa, H., et al. “Antitumor principles from Casearia sylvestris Sw. (Flacourtiaceae), structure elucidation of new clerodane diterpenes by 2-D NMR spectroscopy.” Chem. Pharm. Bull. (Tokyo) 1988 March; 36(4): 1585–88.

    Antiulcer & Antacid Actions:
    Esteves, I., et al. “Gastric antiulcer and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil from Casearia sylvestris Sw.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 2005 Oct; 101(1-3): 191-6.
    Sertie, J. A., et al. “Antiulcer activity of the crude extract from the leaves of Casearia slyvestris.” Pharmaceutical Biol. 2000; 38(2): 112–19.
    Basile, A. C., et al. “Pharmacological assay of Casearia sylvestris. I: Preventive anti-ulcer activity and toxicity of the leaf crude extract.” J. Ethnopharmacol. 1990; 30(2): 185–97.

    Antivenin Actions:
    Raslan, D.S., et al. “Anti-PLA2 action test of Casearia sylvestris Sw.” Boll. Chim. Farm. 2002 Nov-Dec; 141(6): 457-60.
    Borges, M., et al. “Neutralization of proteases from Bothrops snake venoms by the aqueous extract from Casearia sylvestris (Flacourtiaceae).” Toxicon 2001; 39(12): 1863–69.
    Borges, M., et al. “Effects of aqueous extract of Casearia sylvestris (Flacourtiaceae) on actions of snake and bee venoms and on activity of phospholipases A(2).” Comp. Biochem. Physiol. B. 2000 Sep 1; 127(1): 21–30.
    Borges, M., et al. “Partial purification of Casearia sylvestris Sa. extract and its anti-PLA2 Action.” Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Ser. B. 2000; 127b(1): 21–30.
    Ruppelt, B. M., et al. “Pharmacological screening of plants recommended by folk medicine as antisnake venom—I. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities.” Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz 1991; 86: 203–05.

    Anti-inflammatory & Pain-Relieving Actions:
    Silva, F.B., et al. “Natural medicaments in endodontics—a comparative study of the anti-inflammatory action.” Pesqui. Odontol. Bras. 2004 Apr-Jun; 18(2): 174-9.
    Almeida, A. “Antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects of extract from Casearia sylvestris: comparative study with Piroxicam and Meloxicam.” Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, University of Sao Paulo (Dissertation, 4/02/99).

    Antimicrobial & Antiparasitic Actions:
    Mesquita, M.L., et al. “Antileishmanial and trypanocidal activity of Brazilian Cerrado plants.” Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz. 2005 Nov; 100(7): 783-7.
    Espindola, L. S., et al. “Trypanocidal activity of a new diterpene from Casearia sylvestris var. lingua.” Planta Med. 2004; 70(11): 1093-5.
    de Almeida Alves, T. M. “Biological screening of Brazilian medicinal plants.” Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz. 2000 May/Jun; 95(3): 367–73.
    Chiappeta, A. D., et al. “Higher plants with biological activity—plants of Pernambuco. I.” Rev. Inst. Antibiot. 1983; 21(1/2): 43–50.







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    charlenef



    [ edit | delete ] DGL 12/27/06 07:43 AM




    DGL X-Tra
    DGL (Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice) contains these key ingredients:

    Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice - Licorice has been used for many years as an excellent botanical medicine for treating peptic ulcers.*

    Instead of inhibiting the release of acid as conventional medical treatments do, licorice stimulates normal defense mechanisms that prevent ulcer formation. Glycyrrhetinic acid from licorice and its derivative, carbenoxolone, has been used successfully in treating duodenal and gastric ulcers; however, these substances have other properties that are undesirable in ulcer treatment.*

    When the glycyrrhetinic acid is removed from licorice, a safe, effective preparation (deglycyrrhizinated licorice) for the treatment of ulcers results. Licorice extract has been shown to 1) Enhance the quality of mucus excreted, 2) Increase the life span of surface epithelial cells, 3) Increase the number of cells in the mucosal membrane

    NAG (N-Acetyl Glucosamine) increases tissue-building properties. NAG belongs to a class of compounds called amino sugars that are an integral part of cell membranes and the interstitial tissue, which holds cells together. Amino sugars and the proteoglycan structures they build are especially important in the intestine because they form the protective mucous layer and cellular cement that regulate intestinal permeability.*

    Gamma Oryzanol, an extract of rice bran oil, is listed in the Merck Index as an anti-ulcerative agent. It is effective in treating a broad range of gastrointestinal disorders including stress-induced gastric and duodenal ulcers.*











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    jess


    dgl and gaucatonga 12/27/06 07:52 AM

    HI Charlene, I was wondering if you have tried using these 2 products. Did they work? I have tried DGL many times but with no success. The reflux was just as bad. I looked up Guacatonga and read all the info on RainTree. It did mention in the PDF that it reduces acid by 42 percent. That is not enough for me. However maybe with both products it could work. I am definitely thinking about trying it. Thanks for the great info. It is appreciated. I would love to not take Prilosec. Jess


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    charlenef



    [ edit | delete ] JESS 12/27/06 08:55 AM

    AFTER HAVING HEART BURN FOR 2 YRS SO BAD IT WAS IN MY NOSE AND EARS WITH 5 DIFFERENT MEDS FROM THE DR NOTHING WORKED UNTIL GUACATONGA AND DGL I ALSO TAKE STOMACH ENZYMES YOU NEED TO KEEP TAKING STOMACH MEDS ALSO FOR AT LEAST A MONTH YOU CAN ALSO TAKE LIKE UP TO 12 PILLS OF GUACATONGA I ONLY TAKE 4 ALSO I WOULD START SLOW BECAUSE IT CLEANS YOUR BLOOD TOO MUCH AT ONCE MIGHT GIVE YOU FLU LIKE SYMPTOMS FROM DETOXING THERE ARE NO KNOWN SIDE EFFECTS EITHER GOOD LUCK CHARLENE


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    fight4acure


    Lukro 12/27/06 09:08 AM

    I saw this on the news, thanks for posting this.

    I can only conclude that Nexium and the other things are things that break down the Vit D in our bodies, thus causing less calcium absorption, causing our bones to be more brittle.

    Hugs


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    puffy1


    Barrets I have that too? 12/27/06 09:22 AM

    I also have Barrets and have been taking prilosec for about a year before that I was taking acephex. I did not see that one in the list but I can not go with out something everyday more like twice a day. So now what are we suppose to do if I don't take this I am in agony>

    Puffy



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    mbofov


    Pls read - GERD may be due to too little stomach acid 12/27/06 12:30 PM

    Here's something I posted a week or two ago, but no one responded. You people on Nexium etc. might find it interesting:

    GERD, or acid reflux, may be due to too little stomach acid

    Here is an article I copied from Dr. Mercola's website today. Thought you might find it interesting:

    Dramatic Relief From Heartburn

    Sherilyn Rittgers suffered from chronic and severe layrngopharyngeal reflux for three years. It all began when she was pregnant.

    Two years after she gave birth, she continued to have the pain behind her sternum and found herself hoarse all the time. She struggled to talk and sing and felt discouraged because she is a singer and loves to sing. She felt like she couldn't do something that brought her great joy.
    Heartburn:

    Also called GERD, or reflux espohagitis, is a feeling of burning, warmth, heat, or pain that often starts in the upper abdomen just beneath the lower breastbone.
    Occurs when food and stomach juices back up (reflux) into the esophagus, which is the tube that leads from the throat to the stomach.

    Can occur with other symptoms, such as hoarseness, a feeling that food is stuck in your throat, tightness in your throat, a hoarse voice, wheezing, asthma, dental problems, or bad breath.
    An ENT specialist finally diagnosed Sherilyn with laryngopharyngeal reflux and treated her with Aciphex. He told her to elevate the head of her bed six inches, avoid caffeine, and not to eat two to three hours before going to bed. She took the Aciphex and followed all the instructions, but her problem continued to worsen.

    The ENT then sent her to a gastroenterologist, who did an endoscopy that revealed esophagitis. He said the Aciphex was not working and he prescribed Protonix two times a day. She took this medicine and followed all of his advice, but her condition still continued to worsen. Her reflux got so bad that she developed vocal cord nodules.

    Proton Pump Inhibitors May Have Made Her Worse

    By this time she was completely unable to sing and struggled to read books to her little girl. She was put on vocal rest and was instructed by her speech pathologist to not talk for two weeks. The pathologist also suggested that the medications she had been on were not working, and recommended she try Nexium. So, she was put on Nexium twice a day.

    Although her condition improved some, the ENT said that the scope pictures taken of her throat and vocal cords were showing signs of chronic reflux. The ENT suggested she go back to the gastroenterologist. She went back to the gastroenterologist, and he said she really needed to have surgery (a laparoscopic Nissen).

    Sherilyn asked if he could help her take a more natural approach to treatment. He told her that he was unable to do this. She told him that she would like to be referred to someone who would treat her with dietary changes. He told her that there was no evidence to support that diet changes could help with severe reflux. She was very discouraged and felt no peace about having the surgery that was recommended to her.
    At this time she started looking at the Dr. Mercola website and read his book "Total Health Program." She decided that she wanted to go to the Optimal Wellness Center for treatment in order to avoid surgery.

    So, she traveled to Schaumberg, Illinois, just outside of Chicago, from Des Moines, Iowa.
    She was impressed with the kindness and compassion of the staff. She actually met me in the hallway and I told her that reflux is one of the easiest things to treat. I assured her that she would be feeling better in the next month if she followed my recommendations.

    Our staff determined that Sherilyn actually had too little stomach acid and that's why her condition was worsening when she took the medication that suppressed her stomach acid.

    She went home and immediately implemented the changes that were suggested to her. She was a protein metabolic type so she cut out all grains and sugars from her diet and she noticed immediate improvement in her reflux symptoms.

    Within one month she was thrilled to tell her family and friends that her symptoms were nearly absent. It has now been seven months since she went to the Optimal Wellness Center. She is singing without difficulty and can read books to her little girl without hurting her voice. She has almost forgotten what it felt like to have severe pain behind her sternum.




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    ELLIESPAD


    SEVERE HEARTBURN/GERD 12/28/06 07:55 AM

    I had SEVERE heartburn/GERD for YEARS. Started around the time I got pregnant for my first child, in 1982. I carried a bottle of Maalox in my purse and lived on that during my pregnancy. For years I used Baking Soda and water, which offers quick relief but did nothing to prevent recurring flares. I was on Zantac and an Rx. beginning with P, Maybe Propulcid or Previcid. I had so much pain, just drinking water was agony. The pain radiated to my ears, and it felt like a vise on my heart.

    THEN CAME MY CURE.

    Give up SUGAR and take PROBIOTICS. In less than one week, all symptoms were gone. Completely. No lingering symptoms AT ALL. No pain, no burning, no reflux, no spasms, no ear pain. That was 5 or more years ago. I eat the HOTTEST THAI, MEXICAN, SECHUAN, spicey food, almost everyday. I LOVE it. The key is staying away from sugar. I may go off my Probiotics for a month or two, and no symptoms return. But, IF I have a couple days where I eat too many cookies or brownines, it starts coming back. So I normally don't eat that at all.

    I believe I read that cure on Dr. Mercola's website also but not sure.


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    cromwell


    Heartburn 12/28/06 07:56 AM

    Like many of you here, I have been taking PPI's (mainly Prilosec low dose) for many years, since they came out in fact. Prior to that I was taking Tagamet.

    I absolutely believe there is also a link between FM symptoms and PPI use and I also have found studies saying that these PPI's greatly reduce the apsorbtion of B12, which can lead to nerve and muscle pain.

    I also agree that doctors refuse to treat the CAUSE and instead rely upon treating the symptoms of reflux, which can, indeed be actually caused by several things, including auto immune diseases.

    I am currently taking 20mg Prilosec. Like others when I try and reduce this I get terrible lung issues due to inhaling the acid, and almost died once from this, so it is not that easy to say "put up with it". What I try and do is this, once I feel stable, I start taking a little off the 20mg pill every week until I get down to 10mg as the way I see it is is use at HIGH doses that cause the problems.

    What does amaze me though is that in the report they state that doctors prescribing this should be monitoring for bone/mineral loss and B12 and they NEVER ever have done this for me, spread over several doctors. My FP did tell me last year that he was seeing a pattern amonst PPI users of FM/CFS symptoms. I am 60.

    Love to you all

    Annie cromwell


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    jess


    b12 and proton pumps 12/28/06 12:04 PM

    Hi, Since I have been on prilosec for over 12 years I asked the Dr. for a b12 test. He said there really is not an accurate one because if you are taking supplements of it, it will show up in the blood. I actually had very high b12 levels.
    However, he said that a homocysteine test can show if you are absorbing any b12. That is, it it is within normal levels then he believes you are probably getting b12. Well my levels are within normal. Also, there are some minerals which can be absorbed without stomach acid. For ex, calcium citrate. Jess


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    huckfinn


    heartburn 01/07/07 07:18 AM

    I have been on these meds for 8 years. My back is killing me!


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    charlenef



    [ edit | delete ] B 01/14/07 11:49 AM

    BUMPING FOR COBI


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