"Single dose of doxy after tick bite only prevents rash—not Lyme disease"

Discussion in 'News and Research' started by Nanie46, Oct 26, 2018.

  1. Nanie46

    Nanie46 Moderator

    Unfortunately, the IDSA (Infectious Disease Society of America) guidelines recommend a single dose of doxy after a tick bite to prevent Lyme disease.

    International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS) member and Lyme literate MD, Dr Daniel Cameron, explains that one dose of doxy does not prevent Lyme disease.

    One dose of doxy may prevent a bulls-eye rash only, which is unfortunate since a bullseye rash is a very helpful clue in diagnosing Lyme disease.

    Less than 50% of people see any rash at all with Lyme disease, but if one does have a bulls-eye rash, it is absolutely proof positive of Lyme disease.

    ILADS has their own guidelines for diagnosing and treating Lyme disease which differ from the IDSA.

    Read more in this article by Dr Cameron on lymedisease.org:

    https://www.lymedisease.org/single-...08-PEsd3yhu6rTAQIBOiqsPHuLgnAdm4A-5A8s5WK4wrc
  2. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Hi, Nanie,

    The mycoplasma that triggered my CFIDS/ME is very similar to the bacteria involved in Lyme Disease. My doc only gave me two doses of Doxy and mine went chronic in my system. Dr. Nicolson, who is an expert in Gulf War Illnesses triggered by the mycoplasma, says it takes six months of Doxy to drive the mycoplasma into latency. Like with Lyme, it can go deep inside tissues and hide out from the immune system and reactivate later. This is important info people need. Thanks for posting.

    Love, Mikie
  3. Nanie46

    Nanie46 Moderator

    Hi Mikie,

    I'm so sorry to hear that happened to you. Ugh!

    It's so frustrating and infuriating that we can't depend on mainstream medicine, including the IDSA and the CDC.

    A lot of people with Lyme also have Mycoplasma and other infections that can easily go undiagnosed also.

    The IDSA is doing a huge disservice by recommending one dose only of doxy.

    Then on top of that, standard Lyme tests are so unreliable that they miss about 50% of cases of Lyme disease, yet the CDC recommends them, and doctors are relying on them, leaving many thousands and thousands of people undiagnosed and very sick.

    I hope and pray we have major change soon, including acceptance of the ILADS guidelines by conventional medicine and insurance coverage for expanded treatment options.

    Take care, Mikie. Thanks for sharing your unfortunate experience. Hopefully, others learn and benefit from it.
    bct likes this.
  4. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Hi, Nanie,

    So many have suffered from these and other infections with no help for our docs to depend on. My doc later on and I were lucky because I was in touch by email with Dr. Nicolson. He has been a major advocate for us but the powers that be have tried to stop him. He is such a kind man and was a big part of some of the healing I have managed to have.

    God bless you for all you do for the Lyme patients here. Educating ourselves is key to any headway we make. God bless Rich Carson and ProHealth for giving us these forums.

    Love, Mikie
    bct likes this.
  5. Nanie46

    Nanie46 Moderator

    Thanks Mikie! I am grateful for all that you do on these forums also.

    I'm glad Dr Nicolson was able to help you. He is a great doctor and was obviously very important in your improvement.

    It's so sad and frustrating that many people can't find a practitioner to help them.

    Good Functional medicine practitioners or Lyme literate healthcare practitioners should be able to find the root causes of chronic symptoms and help reverse them.

    Unfortunately, we usually have to pay out of pocket to see practitioners who can really help us.

    Someday I hope that insurance will cover those practitioners and testing methods.
    bct and Mikie like this.