small pox and CFIDS/FMS

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by sb439, Oct 7, 2002.

  1. sb439

    sb439 New Member

    Here's a question I wondered about over the w/e, after reading/hearing once more about the small pox vaccination planned (in the US):

    Am I right in assuming that we CFS/FMS people are likely to be in the group with possibly severe side-effects (death was mentioned as one of them ...)? we seem to have all the right symptoms for it. And am I right in assuming that the fact that CFS/FMS are widely not considered as 'real diseases' would make us doubly endangered, as we wouldn't be automatically taken to be in the 'risk groups' of the vaccination?

    I definitely don't want to scare anybody, but it's really a question I would like to know the answer to (As a matter of fact, it scares *me* slightly.) Is anyone here knowledgeable on this matter?
    Susanne
  2. sb439

    sb439 New Member

    Here's a question I wondered about over the w/e, after reading/hearing once more about the small pox vaccination planned (in the US):

    Am I right in assuming that we CFS/FMS people are likely to be in the group with possibly severe side-effects (death was mentioned as one of them ...)? we seem to have all the right symptoms for it. And am I right in assuming that the fact that CFS/FMS are widely not considered as 'real diseases' would make us doubly endangered, as we wouldn't be automatically taken to be in the 'risk groups' of the vaccination?

    I definitely don't want to scare anybody, but it's really a question I would like to know the answer to (As a matter of fact, it scares *me* slightly.) Is anyone here knowledgeable on this matter?
    Susanne
  3. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Not because of the possible reaction to a clean vaccine but because it is suspected that a lot of horrible illnesses in the World may have been caused by contaminated vaccines.

    Love, Mikie
  4. pepper

    pepper New Member

    even for healthy people. Not only can they be contaminated, but they are made from things that many of us can be allergic to. The flu shot, I think, although it may be another vaccine, is made from eggs - I am so allergic I don't know what it would do to me.

    When I was 26, and very healthy, I was told to have a smallpox vaccination before travelling because I had never had one even as a child. That vaccine nearly killed me! I was off work for a week with the pain in my arm - I am no drama queen, believe me, but I told my hubby I just wanted a big knife to saw off my arm it hurt so much. The pain, the illness afterwards and the huge scab lasted over a month! I would never do it again - especially with CFS.

    Pepper
  5. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member



    SMALLPOX TESTING

    July, 2002
    NIAID Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units
    Vaccine research and development has been a vital component of NIAID's research agenda for more than 40 years. Established in 1962, NIAID's Vaccine Treatment and Evaluation Units (VTEUs), have played a key role in this effort. The VTEUs are a network of seven university research hospitals across the United States that conduct Phase I and II clinical trials to test and evaluate vaccine candidates for infectious diseases. Through these sites, researchers can quickly carry out safety and efficacy studies of promising vaccines in children, adult, and specific high-risk populations. The results of these trials may have a profound effect on public health here and abroad. Through numerous studies at the VTEUs, researchers have tested and advanced vaccines for malaria, tuberculosis, pneumonia, cholera, and whooping cough. In the last six years alone, NIAID has supported more than 110 clinical studies through the VTEUs.

    The VTEUs are intended to be responsive to public health needs. Currently, public health priority needs are in the area of biodefense vaccine research. In addition, candidate vaccines against childhood and adult illnesses will continue to be evaluated within the VTEUs.

    The most recent VTEU contracts were awarded June 1, 2002. These new VTEUs consist of multiple Parts:

    Part A consists of Phase I and II clinical trials of vaccine candidates in general populations, including infants and children, adolescents, adults and the elderly. Occasional studies of therapeutic vaccines, other biologicals and drugs in human subjects are also anticipated.

    Part B - Respiratory challenge studies in which infections, with or without symptoms, are experimentally induced under carefully controlled and monitored conditions.

    Part C - Enteric challenge studies in which infections with or without symptoms are experimentally induced under carefully controlled and monitored conditions.

    Part D - Phase I and II clinical trials of candidate vaccines in pregnant women volunteers. The purpose of these trials is to prevent sequelae of infectious pathogens in neonates resulting from maternal transmission of pathogens.

    SOME HIGHLIGHTS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS
    Adult Immunization
    Tens of thousands of adults in the United States, especially the elderly, die needlessly from vaccine-preventable diseases or their complications each year. Therefore, evaluating vaccines for use in adults is a high priority for NIAID. Past VTEU projects include the APERT study, a Phase III efficacy trial conducted by five VTEU sites in collaboration with other clinical centers. This study, in more than 2,700 adolescents and adults, evaluated whether or not an acellular pertussis vaccine could effectively prevent cough illnesses, a major cause of illness in adults.

    In addition, NIAID-supported research has also led to the development of several group A streptococcal (GAS) vaccine candidates in various stages of testing. Some of the major syndromes associated with GAS infection are scarlet fever, strep throat, the skin infection impetigo, pneumonia, bacteremia, acute kidney inflammation, toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating bacteria), rheumatic heart disease, and rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever occurs in all parts of the world and is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children in developing countries. Clinical trials are under way to evaluate the safety of a recombinant protein vaccine against GAS. In addition, the VTEU is evaluating the safety of a novel bacterial delivery system in which commensal bacteria (the so-called "good" bacteria in your body) may be engineered to express a GAS protective antigen. In recent years, there have been few clinical trials testing GAS vaccines, adding to the importance of these studies.

    Childhood Vaccines
    NIAID has invested more than 30 years of research into developing pneumococcal vaccines. Early product development support as well as Phase I/II studies conducted by VTEU sites in infants were instrumental to developing Prevnar, a vaccine to prevent pneumococcal diseases in children under 2 years of age.

    Combination Vaccines
    By delivering several vaccines at the same time, combination vaccines minimize needlesticks and trips to the doctor. The research to improve these vaccines is ongoing. A five-site VTEU trial evaluated the impact of inactivated versus oral polio vaccines when administered with a combined vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), pertussis, diphtheria, and tetanus. As a result of the study, the inactivated poliovirus vaccine is now recommended for use in routine immunization.

    SNIP

    Vaccine Safety
    The evaluation of vaccine safety is an integral part of every vaccine clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, including the VTEUs. Study participants are closely monitored for any adverse effects of the vaccinations they receive. All trials include safety as a primary study objective. In addition to the rigorous evaluation of vaccine safety that takes place during every trial, VTEU research explores emerging hypotheses regarding possible vaccine-related adverse events.

    Recent federal efforts to improve the safety of vaccination have determined that it is prudent to remove thimerosal, a possible source of organic mercury, from vaccines routinely administered to infants. The University of Rochester VTEU is conducting a study to assess mercury levels in blood, hair, and stool samples from infants who received routine vaccines containing thimerosal prior to enrollment in the study and compare them with mercury levels in samples from infants who received vaccines without thimerosal. Forty infants have been enrolled, and the data is currently under analysis.

    Public Health
    Responding to the concern that the smallpox virus could be used as a bioterrorist weapon against the United States, NIAID is exploring the best way to use existing smallpox vaccine supplies to protect military and civilian populations. Approximately 15 million doses of smallpox vaccine have been stored since production stopped in 1983 while the estimated amount needed to control a U.S. outbreak is 40 million doses. Therefore, NIAID began a study to determine whether Dryvax vaccine could be effectively diluted to make more doses available. The results from the initial study of Dryvax in human volunteers showed that 70 percent of those who received a single dose of the 10-percent vaccine developed a sore followed by a scab at the injection site and antibodies in their blood-both signs that the vaccine had given them protection. NIAID quickly designed and implemented a multicenter clinical trial to more extensively evaluate the feasibility of diluting existing smallpox vaccine. Together, the VTEUs enrolled and vaccinated 680 volunteers in less than three months. Initial findings of this study were published in April 2002 in the New England Journal of Medicine. These results provided the government and vaccine advisory committees with essential information for making critical decisions about smallpox vaccination strategies.

    Challenge Studies
    Human challenge studies expedite vaccine development by providing a way to assess vaccine effectiveness in a small number of participants. Compared with field trials, which generally require thousands of participants to be followed for long periods of time, challenge studies allow researchers to quickly understand how well vaccines protect people when they are exposed to a disease under carefully controlled conditions. For example, cholera continues to be a major cause of illness and death in developing countries and is a serious risk to travelers. To test the effectiveness of a cholera vaccine, 85 volunteers consented to receive either the vaccine or a placebo and then be challenged with wild type Vibrio cholera under closely monitored conditions. For these studies to take place, special isolation facilities, equipment, trained staff, and volunteers are needed. The ability of the VTEUs to provide the infrastructure necessary to carry out such important studies is a significant strength.

    The new VTEU awards will last for five years. The seven VTEU sites and Principal Investigators (PIs) are:

    Baylor College of Medicine One Baylor Plaza, 221D Houston, Texas 77030
    Principal Investigator: - Wendy Keitel, M.D.
    Phone: (713) 798-4469
    Fax: (713) 798-6802
    E-mail: wkeitel@bcm.tmc.edu

    Cincinnati University Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases
    3333 Burnet Avenue, ML6014 Cincinnati, Ohio 45229
    Principal Investigator: David Bernstein, M.D.
    Phone: (513) 636-7625
    Fax: (513) 636-7682
    E-mail: Bernd0@chmcc.org

    Saint Louis Univ Health Sciences Center 3635 Vista Avenue, FDT-8N
    St. Louis, Missouri 63110-0250
    Principal Investigator: Robert Belshe, M.D.
    Phone: (314) 577-8648
    Fax: (314) 771-3816
    E-mail: belsherb@slu.edu

    UCLA Center for Vaccine Research 1124 West Carson Street
    Liu Research Building Torrance, California 90502
    Principal Investigator: Joel Ward, M.D.
    Phone: (310) 781-3636
    FAX: (310) 972-2962
    E-mail: joelward@ucla.edu

    University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Vaccine Development
    HSF Room 480
    685 West Baltimore Street Baltimore, Maryland 21201
    Principal Investigator: Myron M. Levine, M.D.
    Phone: (410) 706-7588
    Fax: (410) 706-6205
    E-mail: mlevine@medicine.umaryland.edu

    University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
    601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 689 Rochester, New York 14642
    Principal Investigator: John Treanor, M.D.
    Phone: 585-275-5871
    Fax : 585-442-9328
    E-mail: john_treanor@urmc.rochester.edu

    Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics
    D-7221, Medical Center North Nashville, TN 37232
    Principal Investigator: Kathryn Edwards, M.D.
    Phone: (615) 322-2250
    Fax: (615) 343-9723
    E-mail: kathryn.edwards@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NIAID Home | NIH Home
    Last updated 07/30/02 (RJT)

    Also:
    New England Journal of Medicine - April 2002
    Dose-related effects of smallpox vaccine. S Frey et al. The New England Journal of Medicine April 2002; 346(17):1275-80



  6. dlizard

    dlizard New Member

    no one much seems concerned... you're right we are in high risk for either no effect from this immunization or risking the consequences of the shot.. I'm not so sure but I would guess that these shots will be attentuated vaccine( not live) and if that's like all the rest I've gotten ,I get no benefits from dead virus at all! I've had titres post injection and know I get absolutely zero protection from some of them!!!it scares me to death!!! but what we gonna do?????????????
  7. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    sometimes it takes a while people typically respond to what is forefront on their mind, we all will be facing this decision soon, at some point everyone here will be looking for answers, I, personally am going to ask my doc this thurs about, we all should & post the answer, then we just take it all into consideration & make the decision we are comfortable with.

    Jaci