So how do you teachers, nurses, and case/social workers manage?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by SweetT, Jul 15, 2006.

  1. SweetT

    SweetT New Member

    After years of strange symptoms which took a turn for the worse in 2005, I was finally diagnosed with FMS and CFS. Between my fatigue and fibro fog, my speed in doing my job has decreased. I don't have the energy to return my clients calls or work their cases, and I definitely don't have the energy to deal with them in person. Yet I'm intellectually capable of helping them.

    I could go to a 30 hour workweek and still be considered fulltime, but I need those 40 hours, plus, my employer *mysteriously* messes up the leave time of those on less-than-40-hour weeks. So, I'd like to ask for flex-time as part of my ADA (Americans With Disabilities Act) accommodations, with the option to get my 40 hours however I can each week, anytime from 7:30am to 6:00pm Monday through Friday. But my employer, though it could be granted, probably wouldn't grant it without a hard fight.

    So for now, I'm on the 7:30am to 3:30pm shift, with a 25-40 minute commute each way. Yes, I could be on the 8:30am to 4:30pm shift, but the traffic is much worse, and I usually start to get really, really sleepy at 2:30pm----------so bad that I strain to keep my eyes open while driving home, on the highway. {I will be getting evaluated for a sleep disorder soon but in the meantime, I take natural supplements for sleep, when I don't have to take Benadryl as I suffer from allergies}

    Anyway, how do you teachers, nurses, and case/social workers (and those with similar occupations) keep yourselves on the organization's payroll?
  2. TXFMmom

    TXFMmom New Member

    I was an RN, Advanced Nurse Practitioner and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist for almost 25 years. The symptoms from the FM started in earnest about four years before they became quite intense.

    With massage therapy, and stretching, and rest, I was continuing to work. I have to admit that often, I think I was much sicker than my patients, and I had lost my photographic memory, frankly.

    Finally, I fell in the shower, which I had installed to warm me up in the mornings, and injured my neck, lumbar vertebrae, pelvis, and all the accompanying muscles, etc.

    The sleep problem took off very, very badly then, and I HAD TO RETIRE. The sleep put me in the fog, and I could no longer lift, pull, tug, crawl around on the floor, climb onto those high ICU beds, or fracture beds, or even remember what I had done five minutes after doing it.

    That along, with the meds on which I was placed, MADE ME INELIGIBLE TO CARRY A LICENSE.

    MY LONGTERM DISABILITY COMPANY HAD A FIT WHEN I TOLD THE BOARD, WHEN MY LICENSE RENEWAL CAME UP, THE TRUTH, AND SURRENDERED MY LICENSE. THEY TOLD ME TO LIE, ON A SWORN STATEMENT. AFTER ALL THEY HAD PULLED, I WASN'T EVEN SURPRISED.

    I hated giving u pwhat I had spent so long to build, and I loved my work, but I finally had to admit I just couldn't do it.
  3. WendyC

    WendyC New Member

    I have cut white flour and gluten out of my diet as well as sugar (O.K. the occasional chocolate bar with nuts and raisins). I juice, I take lots of supplements and I go to the FFC in Norwalk and they have me on hormone creams and pills for thyroid, adrenals, pituitary dysfunction. I do flare but I am pretty high functioning most of the time. I will be going on anti-virals once my lab work for infections comes back. Stormyskye here has also been a real model for health.

    wendyc
  4. SweetT

    SweetT New Member

    I don't eat white flour products, either. I try to make things from scratch, where I can eliminate white flour and dairy. However, wheat and gluten is in everything. What can I eat (without buying specially-prepared foods) besides fruits and veggies (not that I'd have a problem wiht those) that doesn't have gluten?
  5. BethM

    BethM New Member

    I am an RN, have worked in school health (I have a credential) for 21 years, have had my license since 1980.

    (Last week I was in a recruiting session with 2 young nurses, one of whom is a new grad. She looked at me wide eyed and said 'gosh, I wasn't even born then!' They looked at me so very respectfully... this is how to feel OLD! Interesting experience...)

    Anyway, since we moved and I left my job, I've been job hunting. My way of coping with fibro and nursing? I am intent on working PART TIME, and hope to find a job that is close to home.

    My goal is to work and still be able to have enough energy left over to have a life outside of work.

    Otherwise, I try to hard to think about what I eat, as to how it will make me feel later, and keep my diet 'clean' in terms of decreasing sugars and bad fats. I try to focus a lot on fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, although I admit that that can be tough at times. Chocolate beckons to me from afar...

    I guess that would be 'conscious eating'. I think there is another term also, but can't think of at the moment.

    I am fortunate, because I am able to start fresh, with new opportunities and options.

    Peace,
    Beth.
  6. rigby

    rigby New Member

    When I was DX CFS in 1994 I went to work part time Then in 2003 back pain and FM I had to stop I could not give good patient care due to the fog and pain. I got to the point not sure if I was doing my job. So much responsability in patient care. Sharon
  7. WendyC

    WendyC New Member

    such as breads, bread crumbs, pasta, crackers, packed foods like chips and snacks and such. You can buy gluten free items from health food stores and on the internet. I just find it easier to cut it out completely. Good luck. It is hard at first but becomes easier as time goes on. Funny too, I used to get these terrible mood swings and anger episodes. Haven't had one in a while. Someone told me to watch what I ate and note what I ate before such an episode. It was bread (I used to cheat on my diet occasionally, but not anymore, at least with bread, chocolate is difficult to give up but I allow myself just 2 cheats a month).

    wendyc
  8. SweetT

    SweetT New Member

    but it's not strong. Our current business agent sucks (he doesn't defend the membership and sides with Management).

    That's why the reduced schedule might be troublesome. My Management thinks nothing about trying to get around federal laws like ADA and FMLA>
  9. SweetT

    SweetT New Member

    and spiritually?

    I know it's hard that it happened to you in 1990 instead of 1994. Have you helped others before use the newer laws in place to their advantage?

    Thanks for sharing and I'm glad you vented. I'm sure it was healthy for you.

    Will you post a profile?
  10. zion1971

    zion1971 New Member

    i was a good teacher. when i first started teaching, students and parents would ask for me the following year. i thought i was going to be an education "starra" :). but i became ill and missed at least 1-2 days a month. not to mention that some days i could not move from my desk. i decided to leave before they asked. i believed the students deserved better, though most teachers did not give them that. i feel that i was called to education. so i took my calling (job) more seriously. i cried my last day. most of my colleagues just thought i had lost my fervor. they did not have a clue how it hurt. i still have not found my way back to anything. i left my career over a year ago. i miss helping teenagers. i don't understand how i could be called to something and then have it stripped away.
  11. jake123

    jake123 New Member

    Nink, You've got to be smarter than they are and I think you are!

    I am a teacher but not in an ordinary classroom, it is for students who have been expelled because they have stolen something at school, sold drugs, caught with drugs, gone to school high, or drunk, some other kind of heinous behavior or some kind of felony or maybe just out of jail.

    So the rules allow me to do this, they work all day with no conversation unless I allow them to at lunch or at the end of the day. Sometimes someone acts up and I either talk them out of it or call my friend across the hall, 6'5" and 275, and he escorts them to the office.

    Without this kind of setup I couldn't do it. I can't project my voice, can't stay on my feet, can't take work home or work on the weekend. I rest alot. Don't cook.