SSD disability and working part-time.....

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by AJME, Oct 18, 2002.

  1. AJME

    AJME New Member

    Dear All,

    I was wondering if anyone here is on SSD disability and work part-time.

    I'm considering selling items off Ebay or my own website for extra income. Mostly handmade craft type stuff working part-time.

    I was wondering if its worth jeopardizing my SSD disability (risking review?) to make extra income selling items off the internet.

    Thanks!
  2. AJME

    AJME New Member

    Dear All,

    I was wondering if anyone here is on SSD disability and work part-time.

    I'm considering selling items off Ebay or my own website for extra income. Mostly handmade craft type stuff working part-time.

    I was wondering if its worth jeopardizing my SSD disability (risking review?) to make extra income selling items off the internet.

    Thanks!
  3. Information

    Information New Member

    The first thing you need to do is learn the rules. You are allowed a certain amount of income. At some point, this starts being deducted from your monthly payments, but it will not put them in danger unless you are making so much you don't need disability anyway. Something else to know: SS traces income through payroll deductions for social security and relies on the honesty of recipients if such deductions are not being made. For example: I had a part time job at a pet store when I was very sick, and earnings were deducted from my monthly check after a certain point. Had I made the money with a cash and carry business, they probably would not have known. But honesty is really the best policy -- just find out the rules and follow them. Incidentally, the SS folks want you to succeed, not fail. If there is something you are able to do that you can build on and will sustain you, they know they need to encourage it. --Jo
  4. teach6

    teach6 New Member

    You can earn up to $780 a month without penalty. If you think you may earn more than that then I would recommend taking a look at the rules.

    My problem comes not with SSDI but with LTD. They deduct everything else I earn from that check. So far my earnings on my business are actually a loss, this year but I also could show a profit if I wanted.

    Barbara
  5. blondieangel

    blondieangel New Member

    You are allowed to make up to $700 per month while on SSD. If you go over, you are no longer elegible.

    If you feel you have recovered enough to return to full-time work, SSD will allow you to work for a 6 month trial. If you find you are unable to maintain full-time work, you may continue w/ SSD benefits.
  6. dhcpolwnk

    dhcpolwnk New Member

    I'm no expert on this, and the rules keep changing anyway, but as I understand it, $780 a month is currently considered "substantial gainful activity." (Yeah, right! What planet are these guys living on?)

    This amount--the "SGA" level--is the cutoff when they determine whether you have a work disability and can qualify for SSDI. It also may be the amount used if they start to deduct from your benefits. However, I think they use a different, lower amount (something like $560 or $580 a month) to determine whether your work for that month constitutes a "trial work period." You are allowed 9 trial work periods before you are bumped off of SSDI.

    It's important to realize that these nine trial work periods *don't have to be consecutive*! So if you have three trial work periods in a row, nothing for the next month, $300 in earnings the following month, another month where you earn more thand $580, another month with less income, four more trial work periods, another month with less income and then another one with more than $580, you've used up your nine trial work periods.

    For me, the big concern with all this is making sure I don't get kicked off SSDI before I qualify for Medicare. After you're on Medicare, you may lose SSDI benefits (or at least be hit with reductions), but as I understand it, you can continue to qualify for Medicare for as long as 9 years under the recent Ticket to Work/Work-Incentives Improvement Act, sometimes known as, TWWIIA.

    As I said, I'm no expert. You may want to consult a benefits counselor--probably *not* one who works for Social Security. Try a local independent living center.

    --Laura R.M.

  7. AJME

    AJME New Member

    "but as I understand it, you can continue to qualify for Medicare for as long as 9 years under the recent Ticket to Work/Work-Incentives Improvement Act, sometimes known as, TWWIIA."

    What state do you live in? Unfortunately the ticket to work program doesn't become active in NC until 2004.

    So I don't know about losing SSDI in my state and the ramifications of medicare afterwards.

  8. sofy

    sofy New Member

    When I went in for my first interview the woman was trying to make me grasp what she was trying to tell me about all this stuff. When done she leaned over and said in very low tones that she recommended not to have any reportable income for the first year. That way there is no reason to raise questions during the trial period. She said that for my ears only and i think that it is probably very good advice to follow considering the source.

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