stop smoking....support needed

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by cindy41, Oct 30, 2005.

  1. cindy41

    cindy41 New Member

    HI ALL

    I HAVE PICKED A QUIT DATE OF NOV 7TH. I AM 44 AND HAVE BEEN SMOKING OR 30 YEARS. I HAVE QUIT AT LEAST 8 TIMES BUT NEVER MORE THAN 3 WEEKS. THE COMPANY I WORK FOR OFFERS A PROGRAM WHICH INCLUDES THE GUM OR PATCH, AND DOESN'T COST ME ANYTHING. IT IS ONE WEEK AWAY AND I AM ALREADY GROUCHY. I AM ALSO GOING TO MY DOC TO ASK FOR SOMETHING TO TAKE THE EDGE OFF FOR THE FIRST MONTH. I WAS ALSO ABLE TO RESTART ALL MY SUPPLEMENTS. I HAD TO GO OFF OF EVERYTHING WHEN MY HUSBAND LOST HIS JOB. BUT HE IS BACK TO WORK AND I FIGURE WITH THE MONEY I CAN SAVE BY NOT SMOKING I CAN AFFORD THEM AGAIN. I AM SO TIRED OF FEELING BAD ALL THE TIME. AND LOOK FORWARD TO FEELING BETTER, BUT I AM NOT LOOKING FORWARD TO GOING THRU THIS, IT IS ALWAYS SO HARD FOR ME, I GET GROUCHY AND WEEPY. ANY SUGGESTIONS ON GETTING THROUGH THIS WOULD BE APPRECIATED.

    CINDY
  2. Rosiebud

    Rosiebud New Member

    it's hard but it's worth it. I stopped two years ago, my wheezing stopped pretty quickly and I would never smoke again.

    I didnt smoke as much as you, 10 in the evenings.

    I used to sit and PRETEND smoke - I took the cig out of the packet, lit it, inhaled with deep breaths, put the ash in the ashtray then put it out. It looked silly but I was at home so it didnt matter. I did this for a few months then was able to stop doing that.

    I believe a lot of needing to smoke is in the actions.

    Also I rewarded myself, I put aside each week the money I would have spent on cigs, I stopped this after a few months but enjoyed it, spent money on books.

    It helped me anyway, worth a try.

    love
    Rosie




    [This Message was Edited on 10/31/2005]
  3. abbylee

    abbylee New Member


    I quit smoking in 1996 and I didn't know how either, so I just quit. I didn't buy them, I didn't carry them around, and I didn't light them. I stayed away from smoking areas, too. And my husband smokes - but I don't.

    I thought about them every second of every day for almost a year, but I didn't smoke one.

    Until you pick one up, put it to your mouth, and light it, you've not smoked. Don't pick it up.

    One thing that I did was I pretended that I felt so bad because I was getting the flu. I forced myself to believe that I had NEVER smoked so I couldn't possibly want a cigarette. Stupid? Maybe, but it worked for me.

    After a long long time, I realized that I hadn't thought about a cigarette in a day or so. Then, a day became a month and then a year and here we are.

    I can go on my porch right now and smoke one of my husband's cigarettes if I want to. But why would I want to? I quit, and it was HARD - I had to lie to myself and play games with myself, but so what. We lie to ourselves about things from time to time, and a little white stick with tobacco in it can't touch me unless I touch it first.

    If you decided to quit drinking soft drinks, you'd quit buying them and you'd order something else to drink. Find something to sub for your cigs if you must - chew a straw, eat a carrot.

    The hard part is that you use your cigarettes as a reward for something most of the time. When you quit smoking (finally) you don't get the cig as a reward!!!!

    abbylee

    [This Message was Edited on 10/31/2005]
    [This Message was Edited on 10/31/2005]
  4. CanBrit

    CanBrit Member

    I started smoking in my teens as well. Also tried to quit and failed many times. This last time, I took Zyban and did the planned stop date. My husband also was quitting along with me. (He has many health problems and really should not smoke)

    We cheated a couple of times, then on Thanksgiving, we went to my brothers cottage and didn't cheat for 3 days. By the time we got back, I just though, if I can do 3 days and I can do a week.

    That was October 10th 2003. My husband continues to have a tough time, and in moments of stress he has one. For me, I just didn't want to go through withdrawal again. I love that I don't cough anymore. The house doesn't smell. My clothes don't smell and I don't get those dirty looks for non-smokers on the street.

    It is the hardest thing I have ever done in my life. I made and you can too. Sometimes it's just an hour at a time. There are all sorts of triggers you have to watch out for.

    We went away for a weekend about 9 months after quitting and I had the most tremendous cravings. I was used to smoking when we went on holiday!!!! Crazy stuff.

    Hang in there,

    Regards,

    Eileen


  5. suzetal

    suzetal New Member

    believe it or not.PUMPKIN SEEDS SALTED IN THE SHELL WORKED FOR ME.

    Every time I wanted that butt. I would munch on them. They worked.A close friend told me about it so what did I have to loose gave it a shot and no more butts been a year now.

    Every now and then I need my fix of PUMPKIN SEEDS a lot better than those nasty butts.

    GOOD LUCK your in my prayers.

    Sue
  6. ckk

    ckk New Member

    I WAS DRIVING TO THE BANK THIS MORNING THINKING OF NOTHING REALLY THEN ALL OF A SUDDEN I SAID TO MYSELF, TODAY IS THE DAY!!!!! I HAVE WANTED TO QUIT FOR A PRETTY LONG TIME NOW, AND I DON'T KNOW WHAT CAME OVER ME, BUT HERE I WAS DRIVING AND IT JUST POPPED INTO MY HEAD. SO, I DON'T KNOW YET HOW IT'S GONNA GO BY AS OF NOW IT'S BEEN AND HOUR AND A HALF, I KNOW NOT THAT LONG FOR A LOT OF YOU BUT FOR ME IT IS. WE WILL SEE HOW IT GOES, AND I DO BELIEVE VERY STRONGLY IN THE POWER OF PRAYER SO I AM ASKING IF YOU DON'T MIND TO SAY A LITTLE PRAYER FOR ME FOR THE STRENGTH TO GET THRU THIS! I KNOW HOW BADLY I NEED TO DO THIS FOR MYSELF AND MY FAMILY. I CAN'T BELIEVE THAT AS SOON AS I GET HOME AND GO ON THE COMPUTER THIS IS WHAT I READ! AMAZING! SO, FOR ALL OF US THAT ARE TRYING TO QUIT......GOOD LUCK AND I KNOW WE CAN DO IT.


    CKK
  7. sofy

    sofy New Member

    if you care enough about youself.

    I smoked 2 packs a day and gave it up 40 years ago when I was pregnant. For over 5 years I would follow anyone around who had a cigarette and just swoon over the smell.

    The desire and the tremendous urge did eventually go away but it took over 5 years.

    I refused to give into my own self satisfying urge at the expense of my families health. Loving my daughter so much more than my cravings is what kept me from starting back up again.

    Once about 4 years after I had one drag on a cigaretter of a friend and it tasted sooooo good that I ran like hell from it and never tried it again cuz I knew Id be back at 2 packs a day within a week.

    Love yourself and those around you to stop. Think about every cigarette as gaining 1 pound except this doesnt show on the outside all the bad health effects are happening inside.

    You must be sick or you wouldnt be on this site. You owe it to yourself to do everything you can to help yourself be the best you can be.

    How can you expect others to try and help you if you dont do everything in your power to help your self? A smoker gives license to others to dismiss your moans and groans and that included the medical profession,

    Quitting smoking gave me a tremendous amount of "I can do anything now" so you all better get out of my way attitude. Its the most empowering thing I ever did for myself.

    Go For it for yourself!!!!!!!!!!!!! Good luck
  8. cindy41

    cindy41 New Member

    Thank you so much for your support and encouragement. I can not believe how much I am dreading this. I have such mixed emotions about the whole thing. I have been sick with CFS for over 10 years, and I know I really need to quit smoking. I am 44 years old and have osteopenia, which is pre-osteoporsis. My mother had 2 broken vertebre in her back and spent the last few years of her life in horrible pain and unable to get around. I know if I don't do this now, that could be my future. My mother also died at 65 from a heart attack and had emphysema. So I have many good reasons for quitting. I really want my life back, and feel like how can I work on getting healthier if I keep smoking.
    Thanks again. I will probably be posting my struggles here next week.
    Cindy
  9. deedeej

    deedeej New Member

    I tried to quit 19 times in the 33 years I smoked. I watched my dads girlfriend die of lung cancer. The sadest part was that she was the only one who looked after her 6 yr. old grandson. They lived for each other. She lasted 8 months. I want to be here for my grandchildren and that is why I quit.
    Try St. Johns wort tea or tablets. They give you a calm ing effect. I also quit drinking beer 2 weeks before I quit smokes. I did a clense of eating brown rice, lentles, fruit for about 6 days. I really thing that helped get the toxins out of my body faster and the cravings were less.
    I still think about a smoke all the time but I find I get more energy just thinking that I really did it. Oh and the money I saved.
    I have q new kitchen, hardwood floors and a new truck.
    Hubby quit drinking also.
    Life is good now and I am very proud of myself so do it girl. You will never feel better.
    Deedee
  10. caroleye

    caroleye New Member

    I developed & facilitated Smoking Cessation groups out of UCLA back in the 80's (if you can imagine!!). Here are a few tips that I learned from those people.

    One is that this "has" to be your decision; not for anyone else. Make note of what "triggers" your thoughts the most, and avoid those situations for as long as it takes.
    Avoid other smokers as much as possible. Change other habits, so that one change isn't just what you're focussing on.

    Team up with "others", and have a support group both at work and by phone when at home.

    Load up with oral substitutes......e.g. carrotts, apples, nuts, gum, etc. And remember that you're doing this because you don't want to have anymore of those chemicals eating away at your body........you might even visit a lung cancer facility.

    Keep a diary of what's helping and what's "not". Gotta pull out all those helpers. My favorite group person who traded his food for cigs in the "camps" just said: I NO BUY; I NO SMOKE. and he had smoked for over 40 years. He was sooooooo proud of himself.

    I stopped back in the 70's, when I could feel that I couldn't take a deep breath anymore. So I used alot of the above, and went "cold turkey".

    Now I'm extremely "allergic" to any cig smells. Thankfully we can now go into non-smoking restaurants and not be bombarded with 2nd hand smoke.

    Sending you more of that "strong will"..............carole
  11. ksp56

    ksp56 Member

    I am sending you supportive thoughts to help tame the beast!

    Quiting is so difficult, especially when you have smoked for thirty years. I know from experience.

    I quit two years ago this month. My Dad had died in June, after a battle with cancer, and my Mom became very ill and had to be hospitalized several months later due to respritory problems. They were both heavy smokers.

    My Mom, who is so beautiful inside and out, looked like death. They diagnosed her with the beginning of emphaseyma. Her doctor came in one evening, and told her she would die in a year or two if she didn't stop.

    Mom told him she would stop as did I. We went cold turkey, I don't think we would have succeeded had we not. Come to think of it, we did chew the nicorette gum. It did help.

    I found that if I could wait five minutes, my craving would pass. It did. I had to do that 5 minute thing very often in the beginning! LOL

    Morning behaviour's had to be stopped. Not sitting at the kitchen table, drinking coffee, reading the paper and smoking. I would have crumbled instantly.

    My friends would smoke and it would smell good, but I remembered how many days it had been and that would take care of the urge.

    I am praying for you Cindy. It is hard to do, but it becomes easier after a few weeks. You will be very proud of yourself. This helped me to hang on.

    Take care and know you have so much support here. If you start and stop, just try it again. You will succeed!

    Gentle hugs,

    Kim
  12. goaska29

    goaska29 New Member

    I have multiple members of my family that have died of lung cancer, so both my parents (who had each smoked for 25 years) and I (smoked for 10 years...I'm only 26 though) quit at the same time. My Dad was hooked on gum for awhile...that helped for him. Just regular gum, no nicotine. My mom was amazing...cold turkey and never slipped up (that I know of). I, on the other hand, was off and on because in the South you can smoke EVERYWHERE (even McDonald's!). They lived in NY where the ban in bars and restaurants and VERY high cigarette taxes helped.

    I started taking Wellbutrin XL and I haven't had a cigarette in 11 months (and the drug side effect is lowered appetite, so no weight gain). All of my friends smoke and even my boyfriend (whom I live with), but I haven't had a craving. I promise you can do it!

    -GoAskAlice
  13. kaiasmom

    kaiasmom New Member

    I smoked on & off from the time I was 17 (I'm 26 now) until about 6 months ago. Quit a few times unsuccessfully. For me, I think it was more of a mental push than anything. Instead of dreading the experience, I decided to be happy about the healthy change I was making. I used patches, then gum to curb cravings. First I cut back to like 4 cigs a day, then just bought one package of the lowest dose patches-used them for 2 weeks, then chewed gum for a couple of weeks after that. It was not easy, and there were times that I really wanted to cheat.

    I have two kids, both old enough to know that smoking is bad. I just couldn't keep setting such a terrible example for them. They would tell me I shouldn't smoke. I guess I quit for them - because I need to be there for them - for a long time to come. And I wanted to be healthier. I hardly ever get a cold or cough anymore, where I used to get at least one a month.

    Unfortunately, I did not see a difference in my pain, which I was hoping for, but at least I know that I am not doing something that can make me feel worse. This last time I quit - for good - the best change I have ever made in my life.

    GOOD LUCK!!! We are here for you :)
    Leanne
  14. lilbird

    lilbird New Member

    I am 45. I stopped 2 years ago after smoking for about 30 years also. It was one of the hardest things I have ever done but I'm sooooo happy that I did.

    I used the patch and also went on wellbutren. Wellbutren is an antidepresent that helps with the cravings. It really helped me. I also found that I would get depressed everytime I tried to quit and it helped with that also.

    Other things I found that helped were. When I got a really bad craving to smoke I would go for a really hard walk. I would also roll up a piece of paper and pretent smoke. I would drive down the road smoking my paper cig and flick the ash out the window. People must have thought I was nuts. But hey, what ever works.

    I wish you the best, I know you can do it. And you will feel so much better.

    Cathy
  15. Moonshyne

    Moonshyne New Member

    Hi Cindy...

    I"m new here, and I"m trying to quit too.. I've found that when I THINK (I"m convinced it's all in my mind) I want a cig I pull out my handy dandy stack of straws, grab one and breathe in! Pretend I'm smokin'... and it gets me thru it! Determination to beat it and the right frame of mind will get you thru it!

    I also burn aromatherapy oils to make the house smell much better..which is also a bit encouraging! In desperation, when in a tough moment the straw doesn't work... I take my aromatherapy oil and sniff! (lemon or lavender oils are my favs) Makes me feel better anyway and I keep movin'!

    Good luck Cindy!

  16. CanBrit

    CanBrit Member

    Another thing that helped me a lot was sunflower seeds in the shell. Not a good thing maybe if you have BP problems but I found the salt and the pickiness of eating them gave me something to do with my hands.

    You can make it. I can remember in the beginning I used to tell myself that if I ever came down with any terrible disease I would allow myself to start smoking again. Can you believe that....what an addict!

    I don't care what gets me now, I know I will never pick them up again. What a feeling!!!

    Good Luck.. you have lots of support here

    Eileen
  17. caroleye

    caroleye New Member

    The most "fun" thing I did was I sucked on my daughter's pacifier at work!! Everyone got a big laugh, and it was like a "reward"!!

    carole
  18. cindy41

    cindy41 New Member

    thanks for the suggestion. I registered at the site. It is wonderful and supportive.

    Cindy
  19. lurkernomore

    lurkernomore New Member

    Well Cindy,
    How is it going? I am so proud of your decision and I am hoping to find my own light bulb, "this it-I quit," moment.I have also been to the Quitnet site and it really is a good one, isn't it?

    I have to tell you a little story. I have decided against going to a family function tonight, due to the fact that a certain couisn will be there. This cousin is a total "smoker-basher" and has ridiculed and criticized me for the last time. Or should I say the last time I went to a family gathering where she was, and she waited until everyone was within earshot to embarrass me, was the last time.

    I guess the point I am trying to make, in my fibro-fog, rambling way, is that quitting smoking has to be done because you are ready. Any other time, any other way, and I think we are setting ourselves up to fail. I have also read that the average smoker will try an average of ten times before actually succeeding in quitting. I don't know if that is true or not, as I have read of many who go cold turkey and that was it for them. I just really admire you and I am praying for your success. I'm also praying for myself, that very soon I come to that "this is it-I quit" place! (I am working on my mindset and already noticing that the smell of it is getting increasingly repulsive to me, so I think this is a good start.)