Terrified to sleep

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by JQP, Jul 11, 2003.

  1. JQP

    JQP New Member

    Earlier in the year I came off amitriptyline cos was seeing things in my room at night. Doc not impressed etc....

    Last night, no meds none to take, about hour after going to bed had the most appalling vision ...I screamed, and screamed and screamed - must have been loud because my throat hurt. Good job partner was there, calmed me down. Poor man, don't think the screaming did him any good either.

    Now tonight, he's not here - visiting dying father 250 miles away, and I am terrified to go to sleep. I'm bad enough normally when he's not here, but tonight real fear.

    The other torment is that I have no meds at night apart from Vioxx and Co-Dydramol as needed. Upped the Cipramil from 10 to 20 mg 10 days ago. Tonight have taken 3mg Melatonin 2hrs ago, and I still haven't keeled over.

    So is there really something in this house, or is it me slowly going off my head? Has anyone got any suggestions or answers to what all this is about or what I can do to reduce the fear factor?

    Sweet dreams to you all.
    Jacqui

  2. Jen F

    Jen F New Member

    Did you take any medicine whatsoever yesterday?

    Sorry you are so anxious, sounds awful.

    J.
  3. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    There is no boogie man in your house, this is your stress coming out when you go to sleep. I've been through this myself. I dreaded dark. I used to force myself to stay awake until I couldn't keep my eyes open any longer. Sometimes I would sleep through a short night, but most often would wake up in the middle of being terrified. You might be having what is called "night terrors". Research it on the net, and you can decide if this is what you have or not. Again, this is your body and mind's way of reacting to the stress you're under. You'll survive it just fine...I did....but it sure isn't any fun, is it?

    Marilyn :)
  4. sofy

    sofy New Member

    There is nothing to be afraid of. Its no different than watching a scary movie. Many people who suffer from narcolepsy have these realistic visions and they are usually of the horrific monster type. They are often so frightened that they are crazy they suffer in silence for years until they learn it is just part of the deal.

    Avoiding sleep will just make the whole thing worse due to sleep deprivation. Rest assured you are not going crazy you are just having dreams that are a lot more realistic than most people have.

    One person I know who had these actually got to the point of where she made friends with the whole deal and looked foreword to the creativity of the next event. She started a journal of her monster visitations and it was really quite well written.

    It got me to wondering if this is where monster storied got their original start. Someone just retelling their bad vivid realistic dreams.

    Want to read more look up narcolepsy
  5. JQP

    JQP New Member

    Jen,
    The only meds I had that day was Vioxx (12.5 mg) and three doses of CoDydramol (didn't take the night dose though). Think that was what scared me most, before could blame meds, now it had to be me or there was something in house but knew the latter was nigh on impossible!!

    I slept last night, with 3mg of melatonin and every light on around me. Couldn't face opening my eyes to the dark.

    Tonight am more confident that will be OK.

    Thanks guys for your support. I've already started on the net researching night terrors, and I think I recognise a few things so far.

    Sweet dreams
    Jacqui
  6. Mrs. B

    Mrs. B New Member

    have had the terifying dreams even when I was half awake. They were AWFUL. But, they were ONLY dreams. I pray. and even though I have several sleep meds from the doc I only sleep for 1-2 hrs. If I REALLY need to be KNOCKED out and dont' have to get up early I take NYQUIL. I don't know how it will react with all the meds you take but it knocks me out for at least 4-5hours. but, I stay groggy for 2 days. I will pray for you and your husband's safe return.

    Lisa
  7. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I know how terrified you can be...I've been there and it's horrible. I read somewhere that in order to deal with night terrors, give it a human name. I did name mine, but now I can't remember what. After you have enough of them, your system starts to get desensitized to them. I also find it helps to go to sleep with a good tv sitcom on. It's a fact that the last 20 mins of reading or tv affects our dreams that night, so watch some funny stuff, Newhart, Happy Days, Dick Van Dyke, etc... They have been real life savers to me. I have also said a prayer immediately on waking up, asking God to help me deal with the terrors and lose fear of them. I think it all helps and before long you will have conquered that little pest! (NAME IT! and then just before you close your eyes to drift off, say "come and join me my friend!")

    Marilyn :)
    [This Message was Edited on 07/12/2003]
    [This Message was Edited on 07/12/2003]
  8. natrlvr2

    natrlvr2 New Member

    it was HORRIBLE! I was afraid to go to sleep.I kept having evil nightmares.Noone understood this.I was almost ready to go to the nuthouse on that infamous night.(I was taken off Paxil cold turkey and was sick/not myself for 15 days,then I lost it)Are you having a withdrawl?
  9. JQP

    JQP New Member

    Because haven't been on night time sleep meds since March.

    Wish I was a horror movie watcher, would be easier to cope with. But have never been. Saw the Exorcist back in the 70's and never watched another horror again, well only those I made fun with with lots of others around, or oldies like Boris Karloff and then it had to be during the day.

    Having said that I am obviously susepectible to horror, which is probably why it all seems so awful.

    Used the melatonin again last night, and slept, ubt feel really drugged now (over 12 hours after taking it). So much for getting the ironing done before Peter is back!!

    Thanks for giving me strategies for dealing with this, you've all been really great.

    Jacqui

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