The effect of guided imagery and amitriptyline on daily fibromyal

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by allhart, Nov 10, 2002.

  1. allhart

    allhart New Member

    The effect of guided imagery and amitriptyline on daily fibromyalgia pain: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

    Fors EA, Sexton H, Gotestam KG.

    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine,

    OBJECTIVE: The effectiveness of an attention distracting and an attention focusing guided imagery as well as the effect of amitriptyline on fibromyalgic pain was studied prospectively. METHODS: Fifty-five women with previously diagnosed fibromyalgia were monitored for daily pain (VAS) in a randomized, controlled clinical trial. One group received relaxation training and guided instruction in "pleasant imagery" (PI) in order to distract from the pain experience (n=17). Another group received relaxation training and attention imagery upon the "active workings of the internal pain control systems", "attention imagery" (AI) (n=21). The control group (CG) received treatment as usual (n=17). Patients were also randomly assigned to 50-mg amitriptyline/day or placebo. Some psychological and socio-demographic variables were also measured initially. The slopes of diary pain ratings over a 4-week period were used as the outcome measures. RESULTS: We found significant differences of the pain-slopes between the three psychological conditions (P=0.0001). The pleasant imagery (P<0.005), but not the attention imagery group's slope, declined significantly when compared with the control group (P>0.05). There was neither a difference between the amitriptyline and placebo slopes (main effects, P=0.98) nor a significant amitriptyline x psychological interaction (P=0.76). CONCLUSION: Pleasant imagery (PI) was an effective intervention in reducing fibromyalgic pain during the 28-day study period. Amitriptyline had no significant advantage over placebo during the study period.

    Publication Types:
    Clinical Trial
    Randomized Controlled Trial

  2. allhart

    allhart New Member

    The effect of guided imagery and amitriptyline on daily fibromyalgia pain: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

    Fors EA, Sexton H, Gotestam KG.

    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine,

    OBJECTIVE: The effectiveness of an attention distracting and an attention focusing guided imagery as well as the effect of amitriptyline on fibromyalgic pain was studied prospectively. METHODS: Fifty-five women with previously diagnosed fibromyalgia were monitored for daily pain (VAS) in a randomized, controlled clinical trial. One group received relaxation training and guided instruction in "pleasant imagery" (PI) in order to distract from the pain experience (n=17). Another group received relaxation training and attention imagery upon the "active workings of the internal pain control systems", "attention imagery" (AI) (n=21). The control group (CG) received treatment as usual (n=17). Patients were also randomly assigned to 50-mg amitriptyline/day or placebo. Some psychological and socio-demographic variables were also measured initially. The slopes of diary pain ratings over a 4-week period were used as the outcome measures. RESULTS: We found significant differences of the pain-slopes between the three psychological conditions (P=0.0001). The pleasant imagery (P<0.005), but not the attention imagery group's slope, declined significantly when compared with the control group (P>0.05). There was neither a difference between the amitriptyline and placebo slopes (main effects, P=0.98) nor a significant amitriptyline x psychological interaction (P=0.76). CONCLUSION: Pleasant imagery (PI) was an effective intervention in reducing fibromyalgic pain during the 28-day study period. Amitriptyline had no significant advantage over placebo during the study period.

    Publication Types:
    Clinical Trial
    Randomized Controlled Trial

  3. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Keep the visualization therapy and dump the Elavil (amitriptyline).

    Elavil and its cousin Flexeril put 40 pounds on my body before I could barely blink. Both left me groggy in the morning and neither gave me a good night's sleep. I would awaken during the night paralyzed and feeling like some kind of weird energy like electrical shorts was zapping through my body. One night, I had an out-of-body experience on the Elavil.

    Visualization is the therapy I'm now using and it has produced excellent results.

    Love, Mikie