Those that are on Kadian...

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Kimba4318, Jun 14, 2006.

  1. Kimba4318

    Kimba4318 New Member

    I have been callin my pain doc (I am on Kadian), to ask if there was something for the breakthrough pain. Last week the PA said to try ULTRAM and that did not work for me (makes me sick to my stomach)....

    I gave it more time and am in pain.... The PA called back today and when he heard what dose I was on (50 mg. 2x a day) he said "whoooooooooo....... if your on that dosage and still in pain, I don't know what to tell you, that is alot my dear"

    Am I on a really high dosage??? I did not think it was mind blowing. I would not be in this much pain, I wouldn't think. He is going to see if they can get me in this week. God, feel like a drugie - the way he acted.

    Maybe I just do not have a tolerance to pain - who knows.....

    Any thoughts???
    Love
    Kim
  2. Kimba4318

    Kimba4318 New Member

  3. SPR30

    SPR30 New Member

    I am on kadian (CR controlled release, which I think is all kadian is) 60 mg 2 times a day, morn and night with endocet (percocet) 10 mg as needed for breakthrough pain. This helps, but does not full get rid of pain. When my pain gets really bad, like when I overdo or get stressed, etc, this doesn't help.
    I have severe RA,OA and FMS with many other illnesses...this is what causes my pain.
  4. kaiasmom

    kaiasmom New Member

    I used to take MS Contin, which is another long acting form of morphine, and I was up to 45 mg twice a day & 75 mg at bedtime, with percocet for breakthroug, so I was taking much more than you are. I wouldn't call that a terribly high dose, in my opinion.

    The thing is that regular doctors don't have a clue how much it can take to control chronic pain from fibro, especially when you have a tollerance to the meds. I know I do, and it has become quite a problem. Only pain specialists are really educated on the heavy narcotics and understand how it works with the chronic pain patients.

    I know what you're saying. I was made to feel like a druggie for many years by my previous doctor - made to beg for a few Vicodin - when they hardly even took the edge off as they weren't strong enough anyways, but there wasn't a chance she would give me anything else. I hope you feel better soon.
    Good luck,

    Leanne
  5. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    That we sometimes need two meds for the breakthrough pain. Just taking a larger dose of our first pain med of choice doesn't do it. I would think a pain doc would understand this.

    Also, with Morphine, what is a high dose to one person isn't to another because of physical tolerance to the drug.

    You have a right to treatment to relieve your suffering. Is there another pain doc you can talk to? BTW, Ultram made me nauseated and feeling sick all over. Drugs designed more for arthritis aren't usually effective for our kind of pain.

    Good luck to you.

    Love, Mikie
  6. lovethesun

    lovethesun New Member

    and it affects my body in the same way.I've found that if I take 1/2 pill of my Trazadone it gets me through the bad times.Kadian and Neurontin have made a big difference in my
    quality of life.Linda
  7. Kimba4318

    Kimba4318 New Member

    I was up all night again in pain.... the Pain docs office called 1st thing this morning to say they wanted to see me today. It was nice of them to fit me in.....

    I just get so uncomfortable feeling like such a complainer, but there has to be a better mix, I would think, to help me get through.

    Thanks and I will let you know what happens!
    Hugs :) Kim
  8. Kimba4318

    Kimba4318 New Member

    Okay - he was alot different in person than the last 2 phone calls. He changed me to Avinz (60 mg) which is in the same group as Kadian (higher dosage and longer acting) and then gave me 30 mg Kadian for nightime since it makes my heart a little racey at the higher dose for night time.

    I wa sshocked that he gave me another script for the Kadian lower dose, knowing I have all the rest of the 50 mg at home. I will keep them, hoping that I can ween back down to that.

    He did 10 (ouchhhh) injections in my stomach where that nerve had been cut. Yikes! Anyway, says I will have to have surgery to have it cut out eventually - but this should help in the meantime.

    Gave me Lidocaine patches for the stomach and said I can use them on my shoudler too. That area hurts very badly when trying to sleep.

    So, bottom line is - he DID care and does not want to see me like this. So, I do thank god for that. I guess they are here to make us NOT be in PAIN and that is what they are striving for.

    Well, that is my update. I hope the new meds work better.
    Thank you ALL, as ALWAYS .... your the best!
    Hugs :) Kim

  9. Tibbiecow

    Tibbiecow New Member

    about pain patients who need more medication seem to freak staff out. They seem to panic and put up a front of 'deny all pain meds' in order not to be bamboozled by drug seekers.

    When the doc gets you in the exam room and talks to you one-on-one, or even when the doc calls you back instead of the nurse, it seems to be night-and-day change. The doctor usually believes you and helps you work out a new plan.

    This has been my experience, anyway.

    I now have to see a physiatrist for pain management because my dear doctor (he's a true gem) is retiring. We'll see how this works, but I bet phone calls for increased doses don't go over too well there, either.

    Maybe doctors are more subject to DEA scrutiny if they increase your pain meds without over the phone without actually seeing you.
  10. Kimba4318

    Kimba4318 New Member

    obviously you are right about the phone calls - it does make sense.

    Can you explain what a physiatrist (sp) does?

    I was just wondering.

    Thanks,
    Kim
  11. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Physiatrists are doctors of physical medicine. Many go into sports medicine. In a sense, they are like physical therapists who are docs. The specialist who helped me so much is a physiatrist. He had so many patients with FMS that he decided to try to learn all he could about our illnesses.

    Love, Mikie