Thyroid? Just curious

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by nice2meetu, Feb 13, 2006.

  1. nice2meetu

    nice2meetu New Member

    Hi everyone. I've been away awhile. I always pop in though and read articles and posts. Today I read the newest article from Dr. Teitilbaum(sp?) about hormones etc. I was tested a few years ago for Thyroid. I was considered normal but on the lower end. I have the symptoms of low thyroid. Now how do I ask for a "low dose" thyroid medication from my Dr? Do I copy this article and take it in? Will he think I'm nuts? I really wonder in the meds would help! What do you think?
  2. claudiaw

    claudiaw New Member

    You might want to read up on wilson Syndrome, it gives good info on low thyroid (even if blood tests are normal).
    A lot of people have a consistant low body temp. that indicates low thyroid.
    Many symptoms of low thyroid are similar to FM.
    On the wilson Syndrome site they give doctor info. The best thyroid med is suppose to be Armour, as it is both t-3 and t-4. Some people produce thyroid hormone fine, but thier body doesn't utilize properly.
    There are vitamin supplements you can try that won't interact with other meds.
    Hope that helps some.:)
    claudia
  3. swifter

    swifter New Member

    It sure wouldn't hurt to ask for the medicine. I tested borderline to low on my test. I had lost my eyebrows, gained 20 pounds for no reason, exhausted all the time, a slight swelling in my throat, very dry hair, plus other symptoms. I had to beg the doctor for the test. He said he didn't think I needed them, but he finally gave them to me. It took about a month, I started feeling better, I wasn't quite so exhausted, at about two months I started losing weight. My hair didn't fall out as fast and my skin wasn't as dry.







  4. ilovecats94

    ilovecats94 New Member

    If you really want to get a better opinion go to an endocrinologist. That is what I had to do to get on a higher amount of medication. I have had hypothyroidism since I was 9 years old and I'm 56 now. So, I've been on it most of my life.

    Most of my family docs have kept me on the low end of the TSH and I have felt awful, but nothing I said would do any good. Then I asked my endo if he would take over my thyroid and he did and instead of a TSH at 5.5 mine is now 2.027 and was .5 not long ago. My endo is trying to keep it at the high range of .5.

    Because of the FMS I can't say I feel any better, though. The time for me to feel better passed by me a long time ago prior to FMS.

    Hugs,
    Faye
  5. leomonkey

    leomonkey Member

    I was within the normal range... however, there was a history of thyroid in the family, this helped.

    I also conducted the basal body temperature test for thyroid. Information can be found on about.com amongst other places. This provided evidence.

    I don't think it would hurt to present the article. Sometimes doctors are stand offish about this. I think, we are in charge of our bodies, you have some research you wish to investigate and seek his/her opinion on this. Fair enough.

    There was another article or statement in the Library Section under CFS and TREATMENT. See excerpt below:

    Kent Holtorf, M.D., on Effective Treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia
    Kent Holtorf, M.D., established the Hormone and Longevity Center in Torrance, California to concentrate of the treatment of hormone deficiencies. Eighty percent of Dr. Holtorf’s practice involves patients complaining of fatigue, with CFS and FM comprising the largest area of his practice. His medical practice focuses on these conditions as well as hypothyroidism, natural hormone replacement and optimization. He was recently selected to be the medical director of the Fibromyalgia and Fatigue Centers, and is currently writing a book on the topic.

    This article outlines possible causes, diagnosis, and treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia.

    "Current research suggests that many triggers can initiate a cascade of events, causing the hypothalamic, pituitary, immune and coagulation dysfunction. The most common initiating cause is a viral infection, which is very commonly Epstein-Barr Virus, Cytomegalovirus or HHV6. These are found in 80% of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia patients. Many people with these syndromes can pinpoint the onset of the disease(s) to a viral infection that never got better. Also, stress seems to be a contributing factor. Effective treatment, with 80 to 90 percent of individuals achieving significant clinical benefits, can be achieved by simultaneously treating the above problems that an individual is found to have."

    "The mix of treatments needed varies from patient to patient. There are some abnormalities that are common. For instance, close to 100% of individuals with these syndromes have low thyroid. This is, however, usually not picked up on the standard blood tests because the TSH is not elevated in these individuals due to pituitary dysfunction. Many of these individuals will also have high levels of the anti-thyroid reverse T3, which is usually not measured on standard blood tests. In addition, the majority of individuals can also have a thyroid receptor resistance that is not detected on the blood tests. Consequently, thyroid treatment, especially with timed release T3, is effective for many patients. T4 preparations (inactive thyroid) such as Synthroid and Levoxyl do not work well for these conditions."


  6. Cromwell

    Cromwell New Member

    CAN BE BEST TO USE. I HAVE NEVER BEEN OFF THE SCALE OF NORMAL ON LABS YET DIRECT FROM THYROID I AM POSITIVE FOR HASHIMOTOS AND HAVE A SHRUNKEN RIGHT LOBE AND THREE NODULES ON LEFT TO PROVE IT.

    I THINK BE SURE TO ASK THEY USE THE NEW VALUES FOR NORMAL THAT ENDO'S JUST CHANGED AS THEY ALL AGREED I THINK THAT OTHER RANGES WERE TOO BROAD.

    ALSO, THIS IS INTERESTING, MY VET JUST TESTED MY CAT AND SAID 'AS A CAT AGES WE NARROW THE RANGE FOR NORMAL'. MMMM WONDER IF THAT APPLIES TO HUMANS/

    LOVE

    ANNE CROMWELL