Thyroid Medicines. Just my story MAY HELP

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by aka1977, May 30, 2006.

  1. aka1977

    aka1977 New Member

    Hello,

    I also suffer from Fibromyalgia, it all started when my father passed unexpectdley in 2000. it took almost 2 years to diagnose me. I had to quit work and know at 29 live on disabilty. Anyway I have read here about alot of thyroid issues. Well I also have had thyroid problems since I was 8, I was put on PTU, and I would go into remission this happend up until I was 21, then they decided to use RAI, I was miserable ever since, I went from having Graves, and Hyperthyroid, to being Hypothyroid and gaining major weight and fatigue, etc. Well just my case. Synthyroid never worked for me, my sister either, so we used Levoxyl for years. Well in 2003 I was searching on the web, and I came across a natural thyroid supplement called Armour Thyroid, I asked my doctor she switched me. I was put on 2 grains which is 120mg, (thyroid wise), I felt better, but my doctor kept wanting to switch my dose, so a few months back I found a new doctor on the Thyroid info site. He is wonderful, he listens he also can't understand why most doctors won't use it, he prescribes Armour alot, I also told him I feel better (thyroid wise) when my levels are very supressed. So right know I'm at 0.05 and your supposed to be within 0.47-5.00, well I told him this is were I feel better (only as far as thyroid goes). Well he ran the whole gammit of tests for thyroid only to find out on me, I make these anti thyroid antibodies, normal ranges are supposed to be 0-40, mine was 189, so he put me on a thyroid supplement. These antibodies destroy thyroid function, and work against you. I would have never known and who knows how long that has been going on. Well all I'm saying is that Armour works well for me, because you get t3&t4, not just t4 with others. But beware not alot of doctors like to use it and won't they say it's harder to regulate than synthroid, etc, but I think it's only because it's cheaper, and you prescribe the name brand. Sorry to be so long, I just wanted you all to know what helped me, and my sister.
  2. aka1977

    aka1977 New Member

    Well I have heard that people being treated with a thyroid replacement usually deel the best if their range is between 1-2, just my thought I think 4 is very high. I know if I'm anything over 1-2 I will be just out of my mind. Like I said Armour had worked well for me. I could tell a difference in just a few days. I also read somewhere back in 2003, that not only was it a good thyroid replacement, but in some cases it has also helped people with Fibromyalgia. I know that it has helped with my thyroid, but still searching for help with Fibro. I'm sorry to hear Levoxyl made your stomach bad, maybe you should give Armour a try. Best Wishes!!!
  3. sixtyslady

    sixtyslady Member

    well just want to say my husband had his thyroid destroyed 13 yrs ago; he just ask the Dr last year about Armour and his dr said no he would"t mess with it, but you see now my husband is having trouble with fast heart rate and he was just checked for a heart blockage last week and that was fine ,they also thought he may have had a light stroke 3wks earlier, but heart Dr does"nt think so, said it could have been a virus, i think its his thyroid, hes real fatigue, I mentioned this to his Reg Dr and he just looked at me, so here we are with no answers,
    and the 2 Drs disagree, we don"t know what to do. sometimes I could just cry, with all he went through. we still don"t have any answers, and it breaks my heart to see him come home from work so fatigued. sixtyslady
  4. aka1977

    aka1977 New Member

    I'm so sorry to hear about your husband. Thyroid problems are miserable. I tried so many doctors before I finally found one that would listen, but I know you get so frustrated, because no one knows better how our own body feels than ourself, and the doctors try to tell you that your fine because of labwork. Look on thyroid-info.com go under topic Top Drs on your left hand side, you can actually look up if there are any top thyroid doctors in your state, or nearby, thats were I found my wonderful doctor. Best of luck, aka
  5. ilovecats94

    ilovecats94 New Member

    Aka,
    I thought Armour Thyroid med was made from pigs/beef? Am I right? If that is so, I couldn't take it because I was on beef/pig insulin in 1984 and was allergic to it and had to be put on Humulin N. I'm now on Novolin N insulin.

    I take Cytomel, a T3 medicine that is very old and take 50 mcg. a day. I still have weight issues, but then I have FMS and probably CFS too. I can't exercise so I probably require only about 1200 calories a day or less.

    My mother had hyperthyroidism, but I've had hypothyroidism since I was 9 years old and I'm 56 now.

    Was on Synthroid for about 20 years, then went back to Cytomel to see if it would make a difference, but it hasn't.

    Hugs,
    Faye
    [This Message was Edited on 05/30/2006]
  6. aka1977

    aka1977 New Member

    Yes you are right long ago many years back I guess they used to make it from cow thyroid hormone, now it is made from pig. I wouldn't take it if made from cow, because I don't eat beef due to the mad cow thing.
  7. mme_curie68

    mme_curie68 New Member

    Psych. meds can interfere with the thyroid as well.

    Zoloft (AD) and Trileptal (anti-seizure med/mood stabilizer) caused a condition with me where my TSH was normal, but my T3/T4 and T7 were abnormal.

    I got off those meds and was on 50 mcg of Levoxyl - they had me go off it to "see what would happen" and I gained 6lbs of the 10 I had managed to lose since the beginning of the year.

    I'm going back on to 50 mcg of Levoxyl - it suppresses my thyroid to low normal which is just fine with me. I, too, feel better on it than off it.

    Hugs,
    Madame Curie
  8. cinnveet

    cinnveet New Member

    Thank you for sharing with us your information. I too have had thyroid problems for the past 40 years. I had my blood work done by and endo. last month and have my appt. with him tomorrow. I have been on synthroid .112 for the past 40 years. I am also going to ask about Armour.

    The web site you gave is great! I was able to locate some Dr.'s in my area. and the web site was full of very useful information.

    Thanks again for sharing!
    God Bless,
    Cin
  9. aka1977

    aka1977 New Member

    So glad you like the website, to be informed is key. Good Luck with Endo Appt.
  10. Shannonsparkles

    Shannonsparkles New Member

    I saw a thyroid specialist yesterday who told me that reverse T3 and reverse T4 levels are meaningless. I strongly suspected from that and other coments he made that the guy was an idiot. :) Now I know for sure!

    Is it possible to get Armour thyroid without a prescription, or are there any other thyroid extracts that a person can buy? My thyroid level was high at last count, but my reverse thyroid hormone level was high too.

    I tried to explain to the doctor my thyroid symptoms, but he just brushed it off with, "Everyone has that." He said three times in our short visit that he was "an expert on the thyroid." I don't believe him.

    This is a long shot, but it's something I'm thinking of trying to find a better doctor. I did this last time my MD wouldn't write a prescription for a little-used yet totally safe suppliment. I called a compounding pharmacy and asked for the names of any doctors in town who prescribe the substance I was looking for. Then dad tracked the doctor down and got the prescription. :)

    (( )) Shannon

  11. aka1977

    aka1977 New Member

    Got to thyroid-info .com, this site offers a ton of information look to your left hand side and go under top dcs I think it is, and there might be one in your area or at least close to you. I went on a found a woderful doctor and he's only 30 minutes from me. Hope this helps. aka
  12. PGWS

    PGWS New Member

    I have severe CFS and tried all of the Thyroid regimes
    ( synthroid, Synthroid with Cytomel and Armour, every possible dose, many different doctors, all kinds of blood tests. I was hopeful, but it did not work for me.
  13. LittleBluestem

    LittleBluestem New Member

    Everyone who goes to a doctor who claims to be a thyroid specialist has thyroid symptoms? Gee, imagine that!
  14. Jeanne-in-Canada

    Jeanne-in-Canada New Member

    yes, there are thyroid supps w/out rx. As well as whatever other glandular or combo you may want to try. I'm all for taking combos. I just don't believe any one gland fails all on its own. You may have one very weak, but others are sure to be ailing.

    It is the case w/ me anyway, and my adrenals. Adrenals are my main problem and even show up on tests w/ very low cortisol at times, but I do much better if I take a combo glandular.

    You may have to experiment a bit. If I take a strong thyroid supplement alone, then I get bad symptoms. thyroid doesn't really seem to be my big issue. But if I take mostly adrenal, w/ thyroid and other glands to support, then it works great.


    Jeanne
  15. FM-in-IL

    FM-in-IL New Member

    Hi everyone!

    I have a variety of ailments including Fibro. All of my problems started however, when a general checkup and bloodwork found me to have hypothyroidism. I had a wonderful GP family doctor who worked with me for about 2 and 1/2 years before my thyroid levels not only looked better on paper after the bloodtests but I sort of started to feel better. He started me on synthroid and I gradually increased the dosage every 7 to 8 weeks after testing my blood levels. I asked him to refer me to an endrocrinologist which he gladly did after a few months and I wasn't improving. I hated the endrocrinoligist as she wasn't willing to work with me at all. She wanted me to stay on the same dosage of synthroid and see her back in 6 months. I was so bad that my husband had to help me walk into her office. I was totally unfunctionable, how could I possibly wait another 6 months for some sort of help. I went right back to my regular GP family doctor who was still willing to work with me. After we both did some more research we both came to the same conclusion. I was going to ask him about adding a T3 drug to the T4 drug (synthroid) that I was already taking at the same appointment that he also suggested trying that. So, he started me on cytomel a straight T3 drug. I had also read that sometimes a person's system needs the T3 at different times of the day instead of just one dose in the morning like I was taking the synthroid. So, I took it upon myself to cut my cytomel pills in half. I took the first half in the morning along with my synthroid and then I took the other half about an hour before I would eat my evening meal. I have been doing this now for more than 2 years and everytime my blood is checked it comes back ok. I too feel better with my levels at the lower end of the scale. Unfortunately, I never truly recovered from all of my symptoms so after going to a rhumatologist it was discovered that I also have fibro. The rhumatologist put me on a dose of prozac which put me back into a big funk again so back to my good old GP doc I went. He immediately took me off of the prozac. Anyway, I still have a lot of physical problems and my great doctor left the area but thankfully his replacement is every bit as good as he was, and together we make a pretty good team on how to manage my health and drugs. It doesn't matter what credentials a doctor has as long as he or she has the care and concern to work with you until you get the right dosages and drug combinations worked out that works the best for your body. I also recommend a great book that I have referred to numerous times written by Mary J. Shomon titled "Living Well With Hypothyroidism - What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know".

    I can also tell you folks from my experiences that getting too much T3 in your system can create you to have an irregular heartbeat or make your heart beat too fast. Because I also have had some hypertension as well as my other ailements my doctor has me on a beta blocker heart drug called Toprol XL which helps to control my heartbeat. Whenever I start to have a few extra flutters in my heart I stop taking my afternoon dose of my cytomel (T3) drug for several days. Basically what happens when I get that way is that my thyroid gland decides to kick in and work a little bit more than normal so my body gets too much T3 hormone from the drug and my natural thyroid gland both giving my system too much at the same time. Sometimes you have to simply regulate your drugs a little bit by going on how you feel and not always by what the blood tests tell you that you should feel like. My doctor says self regulating my cytomel like this is just fine since only I can tell how I feel and he certainly doesn't want my heart beating any faster than it has to.

    I am a big believer that if your blood tests show you at the normal range but you still feel terrible, ask your doctor about adding a T3 drug like cytomel. The armour drug is also a T3 drug which is all natural and does come from pigs. The problem with it is that it is harder to regulate the appropriate dosage because it's just like our own natural thryoid. Sometimes its working and sometimes its not so one dosage at the same miligrams might actually give you too much T3 drug for your system and the next time you take it there might not be enough T3 in it for what your system needs to produce energy. That's why my doctors wanted me on a synthetic or man made T3 drug because then we know exactly how much T3 I'm getting consistantly in each dosage that I take. I always take the brand names of both my T4 and T3 drugs like synthroid and cytomel even though they may cost a little more than the generic ones. My doctor says that almost all generic drugs are the same as the brand names and he most generally will prescribe generics, but he feels that in the case of these thyroid regulating generic drugs there can be differences in what they use for the fillers from one batch to another that go into them. He says that sometimes it's these different fillers that can make a difference in how your body absorbs the T3 and T4 that are along with them, so he prefers I take only the name brand ones that always use the same fillers on every batch they make. So if you have been taking a generic T4 drug maybe simply asking your doctor if you could try the same dose of a name brand T4 drug might make all the difference in the world to how you feel. Regulating your thyroid drug or drugs can seem like a horribly long process which can take several years, but don't get discouraged. Once you get it under control you will most likely feel much better. Find and keep yourself a doctor who is understanding and willing to keep at it with you until together you find the right drug(s) and or combinations of them that's best for you. I also recommend educating yourself as much as you can about your thyroid condition or any other condition for that matter. A good doctor won't feel threatened by your knowledge. A good doctor will welcome your toughts about your own treatments and he or she will also know they can't pull anything over on you because you have studied up and have some knowledge about your health condition.

    I hope my lengthy reply will give all of you a little encouragement that I know we all need from time to time. Love to all of you, Brenda
    [This Message was Edited on 05/31/2006]
  16. aka1977

    aka1977 New Member

    I just wanted to let you all know some other things I read in a book. Ever since I started taking thyroid supplememts back in 1999, I always took mine with milk, and waited at least one hour to eat. But just recently I read that taking it with milk isn't good, so it's recommended to take it with water, and to still wait for an hour to eat or two hours after eating. Also I read to not take your thyroid meds with soy milk, I was doing that for a month or better last summer, I didn't know it wasn't a ok thing. Just some more info on what works for me. It's great to have more knowledge on this very frustrating problem. Another good book is Thyroid Balance, Traditionl And Alternative Methods For Treating Thyroid Disorders, by Glenn S. Rothfeld & Deborah S. Romaine, I haven't finished it yet but so far has been interesting.