TMJ

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by allhart, Oct 19, 2002.

  1. allhart

    allhart New Member

    FIBROMYALGIA.* Many other physcial conditions are found frequently along with fibromyalgia. Each of these can and do occur separately; however, they are also quite commonly associated with fibromyalgia.

    TMJ. Many patients suffering with TMJ problems alsosufferer with fibromyalgia. Unfortunately, many doctors (1) don't recognize either TMJ or fibromyalgia or (2) fail to see the connection of these two pain syndromes. Fibromyalgia almost always intensifies the painful symptoms of TMJ and when one or both temporomandibular joints are dislocated, the pain of fibromyalgia in the neck and upper back is greatly magnified. Both TMJ and fibromyalgia produce similar painful symptoms in the muscles of the neck, shoulders, back, face and head as well as often causing dizziness.

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. This debilitating disorder, just like fibromyalgia and TMJ, is often misdiagnosed and at best, misunderstood by many medical professionals. In addition to chronic fatigue, CFS, just like fibromyalgia, produces muscle pain and weakness.

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nearly half of all patients with fibromyalgia have frequent bowel cramping, severe diarrhea, and severe abdominal pain.

    Depression. As with most conditions which produce chronic pain, depression is a common problem with fibromyalgia. Common depression symptoms include a feeling of low self esteem, helplessness, hopelessness, poor appetite, loss of sexual drive, sleeplessness, frequent crying, and basic lack of interest in life.

    Anxiety Disorder and Panic Attacks. Often, those aflicted with fibromyalgia also experience extreme anxiety and panic attacks, especially at nighttime. They may awaken in terror with their heart beating rapidly, their chest feeling tight with a feeling as if breating is impossible. The patient will be convined that they are going to die. There are many causes of such attacks, and perhaps alterations in certain body chemicals produced in excess with fibromyalgia may be one cause.

    Concentration and Memory Problems. Like those suffering with severe TMJ, patient with fibromyalgia often report difficulty in thinking and even remembering. They often forget where they've parked the car at the mall, for example. Simple facts and numbers are often forgotten. Understandably, great frustration often accompanies these memory problems.

    Irritable Bladder. Those with fibromyalgia often complain of frequent, painful urination. Although they feel as if their bladder is infected, urine and blood tests are negative.

    Mitral Value Prolapse. There may be a statistical correlation with those suffering with mitral value prolapse (a weakness in the mitral value of the heart) and fibromyalgia. Since the mitral value is mostly fibrous connective tissue, perhaps the same process that effects other connective tissue of the body (eg, musles, ligaments, tendons and bursae) also damages the mitral value of the heart.*

    Fibrocytic Breast Disease and Endometriosis. Although there is no known explaination (yet!), both fibrocystic disease of the breast and endometriosis are often seen in women with fibromyalgia.*
  2. allhart

    allhart New Member

    FIBROMYALGIA.* Many other physcial conditions are found frequently along with fibromyalgia. Each of these can and do occur separately; however, they are also quite commonly associated with fibromyalgia.

    TMJ. Many patients suffering with TMJ problems alsosufferer with fibromyalgia. Unfortunately, many doctors (1) don't recognize either TMJ or fibromyalgia or (2) fail to see the connection of these two pain syndromes. Fibromyalgia almost always intensifies the painful symptoms of TMJ and when one or both temporomandibular joints are dislocated, the pain of fibromyalgia in the neck and upper back is greatly magnified. Both TMJ and fibromyalgia produce similar painful symptoms in the muscles of the neck, shoulders, back, face and head as well as often causing dizziness.

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. This debilitating disorder, just like fibromyalgia and TMJ, is often misdiagnosed and at best, misunderstood by many medical professionals. In addition to chronic fatigue, CFS, just like fibromyalgia, produces muscle pain and weakness.

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nearly half of all patients with fibromyalgia have frequent bowel cramping, severe diarrhea, and severe abdominal pain.

    Depression. As with most conditions which produce chronic pain, depression is a common problem with fibromyalgia. Common depression symptoms include a feeling of low self esteem, helplessness, hopelessness, poor appetite, loss of sexual drive, sleeplessness, frequent crying, and basic lack of interest in life.

    Anxiety Disorder and Panic Attacks. Often, those aflicted with fibromyalgia also experience extreme anxiety and panic attacks, especially at nighttime. They may awaken in terror with their heart beating rapidly, their chest feeling tight with a feeling as if breating is impossible. The patient will be convined that they are going to die. There are many causes of such attacks, and perhaps alterations in certain body chemicals produced in excess with fibromyalgia may be one cause.

    Concentration and Memory Problems. Like those suffering with severe TMJ, patient with fibromyalgia often report difficulty in thinking and even remembering. They often forget where they've parked the car at the mall, for example. Simple facts and numbers are often forgotten. Understandably, great frustration often accompanies these memory problems.

    Irritable Bladder. Those with fibromyalgia often complain of frequent, painful urination. Although they feel as if their bladder is infected, urine and blood tests are negative.

    Mitral Value Prolapse. There may be a statistical correlation with those suffering with mitral value prolapse (a weakness in the mitral value of the heart) and fibromyalgia. Since the mitral value is mostly fibrous connective tissue, perhaps the same process that effects other connective tissue of the body (eg, musles, ligaments, tendons and bursae) also damages the mitral value of the heart.*

    Fibrocytic Breast Disease and Endometriosis. Although there is no known explaination (yet!), both fibrocystic disease of the breast and endometriosis are often seen in women with fibromyalgia.*
  3. allhart

    allhart New Member

    Approximately three to six million Americans have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia. This debilitating disease is most commonly associated with women who are experiencing hormonal changes during pre-menopause or after a hysterectomy. Besides hormonal changes, onset of fibromyalgia could be from physical trauma such as an automobile accident, unusual and extreme emotional trauma or stress, infections, rheumatoid arthritis, or lupus. Symptoms seem to appear between the ages of 20 and 50. There are no laboratory tests such as x-rays or blood tests that can verify this disease. Fibromyalgia is usually diagnosed by locating 18 "tender points", starting at the back of the neck and extending to the knee area. These points are very tender to the touch and can be felt most of the time.
    Fibromyalgia is usually characterized by pain in the muscles and joints; anxiety disorder and panic attacks; irritable bladder; depression; chronic fatigue; sleeplessness and TMJ (temporomandibular joint disorder). The pain experienced in fibromyalgia and TMJ are very similar. Both have multiple trigger points (tender points) in various muscle groups, which create intense pain. These trigger points have been described as lumps and bumps that feel like knots in the muscles. When severe, these lumps illicit extreme pain all the time.

    Both TMJ and fibromyalgia effect the muscles of the face, head, neck, shoulders, back and even the calves. Recently, trigger points have been isolated and confirmed by electromyography imaging. The points can also be felt by touch. Unfortunately, both TMJ and fibromyalgia are often not diagnosed and the person may suffer for years with severe pain and not receive any appropriate treatment except pain medication and some sort of tranquilizers, having been told it’s all in their head.

    Many people who suffer from fibromyalgia also suffer from TMJ. TMJ is most commonly seen in women between the ages of 20 and 50 and the cause is very similar to fibromyalgia as described above. Those suffering with TMJ have had some sort of trauma to the head and neck, either from an accident, even braces or a neck brace during orthodontic treatment. Most of the time, the person is under tremendous stress and they either clench or grind their teeth. As a result of the clenching or grinding, the jaw joint become damaged or dislocated resulting in clicking, ringing, and popping noises which are heard in the ears, often causing dizziness. Missing teeth or ill fitting dentures may also cause TMJ pain.

    Individuals suffering with TMJ commonly show symptoms of dizziness, neck, shoulder, back pain, headaches, pain and pressure behind the eyes, sinus problems, and headaches. The treatment for TMJ includes replacing any missing teeth, an orthotic occlusal plate to help stabilize the bite and help balance the skeletal-musculature in the jaw, and head and neck area. Physical therapy and massage are also very helpful for both TMJ and Fibromyalgia treatment.

    Stress must be brought under control with accompanying life style changes as needed. Another very important factor is diet and nutrition. It is not uncommon for the person suffering with fibromyalgia or TMJ to be a type A personality. They may have a tendency to be a workaholic or perfectionist with no time to relax and pay attention to good eating habits.

    During the initial stage of treatment medication may be necessary to help relax the muscles, control pain and help with sleeplessness. However, the best treatment would also include, (eventually eliminating all medication) physical therapy, massage, plenty of vegetables and fruits, and water. Detoxing the body under supervision of a trained practitioner is also very helpful.

    Since both TMJ and fibromyalgia are so closely related, proper diagnosing of both is very important. Treatment involving a multi-disciplinary approach where life style changes as well as addressing physical pain will make both TMJ and fibromyalgia much more manageable.