Very high heart rate

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by roro, Oct 27, 2002.

  1. roro

    roro New Member

    When I do cardio, my heart rate shoots up to about 160-170. Everyone else's is 110-120, and they tell me mine is too high and I should tell my doctor. Does anyone know if this is dangerous? I had an EKG at my last physical and it was fine, so my resting heart rate must be normal.
    I feel fine when I exercise. I can breathe, talk, and feel OK. When I first started in january, I felt awful, I felt like I was gasping for breath and like I was gonna die, but I was really out of shape back then.
    Its not the machine either, I have tried several different machines, several different types of machines, and other people have tried the same ones I try with normal results.

  2. roro

    roro New Member

    When I do cardio, my heart rate shoots up to about 160-170. Everyone else's is 110-120, and they tell me mine is too high and I should tell my doctor. Does anyone know if this is dangerous? I had an EKG at my last physical and it was fine, so my resting heart rate must be normal.
    I feel fine when I exercise. I can breathe, talk, and feel OK. When I first started in january, I felt awful, I felt like I was gasping for breath and like I was gonna die, but I was really out of shape back then.
    Its not the machine either, I have tried several different machines, several different types of machines, and other people have tried the same ones I try with normal results.

  3. karen2002

    karen2002 New Member

    Everyones target heart rate is different. You must use your age, sex, and resting heart rate in the calculation, as well as the training level you are trying to achieve. Here is the Karvonen Formula. As you can see from the higher training level in the bottom example.. that rate would be 166....per minute--that is an hard workout. Not far at all from your 170. Perhaps you should just go to a 65% range--a lighter workout, if this concerns you. But you say you level of fitness has improved, from gasping, to being able to converse, etc. I have put a chart on both the 65% and the 85%...also.

    Karvonen Formula:

    (220) - (your age) = Maximum Heart Rate (MHR)
    (MHR) - (resting heart rate) = Heart Rate Reserve (HRR)
    (HRR) x (65% - 85%) = training range %
    (training range %) + (resting heart rate) = (your target training zone)

    Example: If you are 35 years old and have a resting heart rate of 60 beats per minute:

    220 - 35 = 185
    185 - 60 = 125
    125 x .65 = 81 (65% training percentage)
    81 + 60 = 141 beats per minute (low end of target heart rate zone)
    125 x .85 = 106 (85% training percentage)
    106 + 60 = 166 beats per minute (high end of target heart rate zone)

    The target heart rate for this person would be between 141 and 166 beats per minute.

    1st figure Low Intensity -60-65% MHR
    2nd figure High Intensity 80-85% MHR

    Total Calories Expended per min. 4.86 6.86
    Fat Calories expended per min. 2.43 2.7
    Total Calories expended in 30 min. 146 206
    Total Fat calories expended in 30 min. 73 82
    Percentage of fat calories burned 50% 39.85%

    Using a moniter while you are working out--would be a great help to you---so you could lighten up your excercise to keep your heart range in the area....that you choose. Remember that people who are exceptionally fit will have much lower rates than you, doing the same activity. If they are running 110 or 120..its just my opinion but they need to step up their workout. Look above ...and see that 141 beats per min. is the low end of the target heart rate zone.
    Always a good idea to check w/ your physician before undertaking an excercise regime.
    Karen

    [This Message was Edited on 10/27/2002]
  4. webkook

    webkook New Member

    Hi Roro,

    Hey, I had the same problem. My heart rate went up and stayed up above normal, all the time, but especially during exercise. It was in the same range as yours. I was on Elavil for the FMS at the time, and decided to get off the medication (with my doctor's guidance) to see if there was any correlation between the medicine and the heart rate. Within 2 weeks of getting off the Elavil, my heart rate went back to normal. I've heard FMS can cause a rapid heartbeat but I'm not sure that's true, but in my case it was the Elavil that was causing it.

    Best of luck to you!
    Lynn
  5. roro

    roro New Member

    My resting is 68, and I am 38 yrs old, so in the 160's is not too bad. Well that makes me feel better!
    I guess the people at the gym are in really good shape.