What is something higher than Fibromyalgia? Possible?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by fibrohugslife, Jul 20, 2006.

  1. fibrohugslife

    fibrohugslife New Member

    Well I know that this question is a long shot but I am sure that there is something worse than Fibromyalgia in pain wise?

    My pain levels are just so high and everytime I go to the doctor they are amazed that I am in so much pain. Anyway, is MS the next level up on the pain level?

    I went to the pain clinic yesterday and with the blood test he said that I did not have arthritis, but have a high ANA inflammation factor and I know I have heard of that before, but as always they like to rush me so I he said things fast.

    Anyway he said that he thought there might be something else going because of my high pain inflammation and they do know the origins of this really high pain so I don't know. I tried to get him explain deeper but those darn student doctors. They didn't test me for Lupus as they had promised and that made me mad. I need to know EXACTLY what is wrong with me so there I can see if there is an early possibility of faxing it.



    Anyway please post on my thread, thank you!
  2. cymbeline

    cymbeline New Member

    I found this earlier- hope it might be helpful.

    ANA


    Also known as: Antinuclear Antibody test, fluorescent antinuclear antibody, FANA
    Formal name: Antinuclear Antibody Test
    Related tests: Autoantibody tests email this page

    print this article


    Common Questions
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    1. Why is it called “anti-nuclear” antibody?
    2. If I have a negative ANA test, will my doctor order any other antibody tests?
    3. My doctor told me my ANA test is positive but he isn’t sure if I have lupus. How can this be?
    4. Is SLE the same thing as lupus?


    1. Why is it called “anti-nuclear” antibody?
    ANA are gamma-globulins (types of antibodies) found in patients with certain autoimmune diseases. ANAs are directed against certain components found in the center, or nucleus, of a cell in the body.


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    2. If I have a negative ANA test, will my doctor order any other antibody tests?
    Tests for specific autoantibodies are almost never positive in patients who get a negative ANA result. These tests generally should not be ordered in patients with negative ANA test results.


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    3. My doctor told me my ANA test is positive but he isn’t sure if I have lupus. How can this be?
    The body’s immune system normally produces antibodies that are designed to fight off diseases and infections. In an autoimmune disease, something goes wrong with this system and the person’s body begins producing autoantibodies -- antibodies that attack their own tissues. Antinuclear antibodies are autoantibodies that go against the cell nucleus, or central controlling part of the cell. The ANA test looks at the concentration of antinuclear antibodies in a person’s blood. A positive result means that you have a higher than “normal” concentration of these antibodies. This is one of the tools in diagnosing lupus as well as several other autoimmune diseases, so a positive result may be related to lupus or another disease. Or, you may simply have a higher than normal concentration of these autoantibodies just as some people’s normal body temperature is higher or lower than 98.6°. Even among people with lupus, these results can vary widely – one person can be in remission at a certain level of ANA while another can be extremely ill at the same level. Interpreting what these results mean for you is the work of your doctor. And, your doctor may need to compare your test results as well as the severity of your symptoms over a period of time in order to make a definitive diagnosis. This additional time may also allow your doctor the opportunity to eliminate other possible causes for your symptoms.


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    4. Is SLE the same thing as lupus?
    There are actually several forms of lupus. SLE is the form that is most commonly referred to when someone mentions “lupus.” Systemic lupus means that it can attack almost any organ or system in your body. This is the form with the most severe effects on the body. There are other forms of lupus that are primarily limited to skin and their symptoms include rashes that may be found in many shapes and many locations on the body. The symptoms of lupus differ greatly among different individuals. There is also a condition called drug-induced lupus, which occurs in some people when they take certain drugs. The symptoms usually fade when the drug use stops. This form of lupus happens only to an extremely small percentage of patients taking such drugs.


    From: www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/ana/ask.html
  3. fibrohugslife

    fibrohugslife New Member

    Thank you so much for posting this article and I definitely printed it out. I knew there was something more wrong with me but it is just has not been necessarily defined for the last year or so.

    He said my ANA factor was positive but they did not have a definite idea what it was that was going on with me.

    Thank you!