Which Transfer Factor?

Discussion in 'Transfer Factor' started by LISALOO, Apr 14, 2008.

  1. LISALOO

    LISALOO New Member

    Which Transfer Factor for EBV and HHV-6? I've tried 4life, did nothing.

    I also have IC so it can't have Vitamin B or C.

    Any sugestions? Thanks!!!
    [This Message was Edited on 04/14/2008]
  2. spacee

    spacee Member

    You would need Immune Transfer #2 from Chisholm Lab. Just call 10803-663-9618. Open Mon=Thurs 8 am -5 and on Friday til noon.

    It costs about $140 for 30 capsules plus shipping, must be kept refridgerated (although I travel with it in with my other meds and it seems ok for a short period of time).

    You will probably feel fluish at first. Take at night if it makes you feel ill. Open and put contents under tongue and you won't have have an empty stomach or wait 20 minutes to eat.

    Give it a month to feel better. Can feel improvement for 6 months. Then start taking some days off to keep your immune system guessing.

    If you want to be really cautious, open the capsule and scoop out halve and put it under your tongue and save the other half for the next day.

    Good luck! It is expensive but you can probably reduce the amount you take after you plateau....in 6 months.

    Spacee

    PS, I am not a doctor and please ask his/her advice before trying.
    [This Message was Edited on 04/17/2008]
  3. spacee

    spacee Member

    I can't take those either because of bladder.

    Spacee
  4. Science_Guy

    Science_Guy New Member

    A few years ago ProHealth ran an article about transfer factor from a researcher at Duke Med Center named Aaron White. He now has a book out about transfer factor that is in its second edition. I haven't read the second edition but the first edition contained everything anyone could possibly want to know about transfer factor, including how they work, how much to take, what to expect and so on.

    Also, there are other options for immune weaknesses available now that are good in different ways than transfer factors. Doing a search for "thymus protomorphogens" will yield interesting results. Protomorphogens are molecules that trigger specific organs (in this case the thymus, in which T-cells mature) to rebuild and work harder.

    As other posters have pointed out, transfer factors don't seem to "fix" the immune problems that leave some of us vulnerable to infections. Rather, they help the body go after and kill whatever pathogens are in there. They do boost immune system health, but not enough to keep all people from relapsing if they stop taking them. Protomorphogens for thymus, thyroid, adrenals, and even the pituitary and hypothalamus seem to be promising adjuncts for treating basically any condition with an immune component.

    Hope this helps!!

    PS - The book is called "A Guide to Transfer Factors and Immune System Health, 2nd Edition" Again, I haven't read it but the first edition was excellent.