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BOSWELLIA, ELASTASE INHIBITOR

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tansy

New Member
Below are descriptions of boswellia and it’s therapeutic uses from 2 www sites.


Boswellia - Frankincense

Other Common Names: Olibanum, Frankincense, Salai guggal, Boswellia serrata

Boswellia, from the Boswellia serrata tree, is found primarily in India. The Boswellia tree is a balsamic tree that secretes aromatic oleoresins which are collected, when they dry, into a gum, after exuding from cuts in the bark. In the ancient Ayurvedic medical texts of India, the gummy exudate from boswellia is grouped with other gum resins and referred to collectively as guggals.

The gum-resin is reported to possess, sedative and marked analgesic activity. The defatted extract of the gum exudate (oleo-gum-resin) was found to possess marked anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity against adjuvant arthritis in experimental animals and was free from toxicity or any other side effects. It was also shown to possess marked cholesterol and triglyceride lowering activity. Clinical trials on rheumatic patients have shown promising results. Boswellic acids isolated from the gum resin inhibit, in a concentration dependent manner, 5-lipoxygenase product formation with an IC50 of 1.5 µM. Chronic toxicity studies in healthy monkeys revealed that the drug was devoid of bio-chemical, hematological and other toxicities.

The gum is credited with astringent, stimulant, expectorant, diuretic, diaphoretic, antipuretic, stomachic emmenagogue, ecbolic and antiseptic properties. It is reported to be useful in ulcers, tumours, goitre, cystic breast, diarrhea, dysentery, piles, asthma, bronchitis, chronic laryngitis, jaundice, syphilitic and skin diseases. It is used in the preparation of an ointment for sores and is used with butter in syphilis. The gum-resin is astringent, anti-pyretic, antidysentry, expectorant, diaphosetic, diuretic, stomachic, emmenagogue. It is useful in fevers, diaphoresis, convulsions, dysentery, urethrorrhea, orchiopathy, bronchitis, asthma, cough, stomatitis, syphilitic diseases, chronic laryngitis, jaundice and arthritis.

Boswellic acids are effective anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic agents, for both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, soft tissue rheumatism, and low back pain. They also help control excessively high blood lipids and atherosclerosis, and protect the liver against bacterial galactosamine-endotoxins. The non-acid part of the gum has pain-relieving and sedative qualities, and in high doses can lower blood pressure, and reduce heart rate in dogs but increase it in frogs. Observed benefits of Boswellia include reduction in joint swelling, increased mobility, steroid sparing action (less steroids required in combined treatment), less morning stiffness, improved grip strength, and general improvement in quality of life, for both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

- Pachnanda et al., Ind. J. Pharmacol., 1981;13: 63. - The Wealth of Asia, P.I.D.,C.S.I.R., 1996, New Delhi



Boswellia, also known as boswellin or "Indian frankincense," comes from the Boswellia serrata tree that grows in the dry hills of India. For centuries, traditional Indian healers have taken advantage of the anti-inflammatory properties of the tree bark's gummy resin, called salai guggal. Modern preparations made from a purified extract of this resin and packaged in pill or cream form are used to reduce inflammation associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Unlike conventional NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen--the accepted treatments for joint inflammation--boswellia doesn't seem to cause stomach irritation. It also may be effective for back pain and certain chronic intestinal disorders.

Health Benefits

Research has identified specific active anti-inflammatory ingredients in this herb, which are commonly referred to as boswellic acids. In animal studies, these acids have been shown to significantly reduce inflammation in several ways. They deter inflammatory white cells from infiltrating damaged tissue. They improve blood flow to the joints. And they also block chemical reactions that set the stage for inflammation to occur in chronic intestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Specifically, boswellia may help to:

· Ease osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. Boswellia can be taken internally as well as applied topically to affected joints to relieve inflammation associated with these joint disorders. This may lessen morning stiffness and increase joint mobility. In a study of 175 patients with rheumatic disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, a crippling joint disease, 122 participants experienced reduced stiffness and inflammation two to four weeks after starting on a boswellia regimen.

· Decrease back pain. Boswellia's anti-inflammatory properties can help to reduce aching and stiffness, especially when associated with low back pain. Although research indicates that boswellia is best taken orally for this purpose, creams appear to be soothing as well.

· Control certain inflammatory bowel diseases. Boswellia appears to reduce the inflammation associated with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, both painful intestinal disorders. And it seems to accomplish this without the risk of further gut irritation associated with many conventional pain relievers. In a 1997 study of ulcerative colitis sufferers, 82% of those who took boswellia extract (350 mg three times daily) experienced a complete remission of their disease









[This Message was Edited on 04/07/2004]
 

drtomcat

New Member
Tansy,

If you havn't found it yet, check out a commmercial site called Boswellin (notice the spelling). Be sure and read through the "booklet" section. The site has technical data and citations showing what component of the boswellia has the greatest activity.

David
 

tansy

New Member
I did find lots of info on the internet using it's name, there's a lot out there to read. It's an ayuvedic medicine sourced from the same tree as frankincense essential oil which I use when I hurt all over, it's wonderfully warm and soothing.

I started on bowsellia in Decenber taking 500mg three times a day. As I stated on an other post it does not take effect immediately but it's benefits will build up. After giving out info on this herb on the other boards I use I was delighted to learn it helped others too.

I always find that exciting.

A friend in the UK with arthritis was having a terrible time with the side effects of his meds. After telling him about how first Boswellia, then a course of serrapeptase, helped me he used the exact same programme. They worked. After three months he told his GP he had stopped all his meds bar one; he's more mobile, in less pain and happy. His GP is impressed. He did change his diet as well and used more supps.

I thought the boswellia was not working, stopped taking it and gradually my inflammatory/infection symptoms got worse again. Needless to say I went straight back on it again.

It's definitely effective.

Love
Tansy
[This Message was Edited on 04/07/2004]
 

tandy

New Member
Thanks for this article!! I have no knowledge of this Boswellia....,except this read, I'll search it and read more but I have one immediate question. Is this readily available in vitamin stores??
and is it sold just as you see it"Boswellia"
??????? Thanks~

While I have your attention: Do feel that echincea(sp??)
is safe for our diseases???
Just to shorten the duration of a cold~
after I picked some up, I read where people with auto-immune conditions should be careful. I have'nt taken any at all yet~ Just curious your thoughts on this as well.
Apreciate your time!!
Regards,
Tandy :)
 

tansy

New Member
and more so just recently in the UK. If your local stores don't stock it there's plenty on the internet in the US that do. I take Jarrow's Max Boz which is 500mg 65% boswellic acids.

Echinacea is a herb that should be used with the greatest of care. I see it time and time again on the information given my people who claim to know what causes our DDs and can make us all better,unless we're not thinking right;), and it makes me livid. I was warned off it by my acupuncturist but have tried it now and again. I tend to have high white blood cell counts, allergies and a lot of inflammation so I don't play around with this herb.

Based on what I understand (still much to learn) I would only try this whilst also using anti infectives and in short bursts. If used for more than three weeks it loses it's effectiveness. I think it would be much more useful for us when we go down with a virus that's going around, that's when I use it.

I pulse all my herbal antiinfectives and tend to choose what's seems best at any given time. One of my favourites is berberine complex which has goldenseal in it, goldenseal is similar to echinacea, in that combo having an immune stimulant is not a problem.

Hope this helps

love
Tansy


[This Message was Edited on 06/01/2004]
 

tansy

New Member
for those who have asked for info on boswellia.

It's still working, I've been taking it since December.

love
Tansy
 

Plantscaper

New Member
I have used both the Source Natural and NOW brands..presently, using the NOW brand, as it also, contains Turmeric, which has the added benefits of working on the coagulation problem and is a good antibacterial, antifungal, etc. I have noticed that I do not have pains in the back and shoulder area that I was having prior to my use of Boswellia and seem to have a lot less stiffness..

PS
 

victoria

New Member
Why did you stop the serrapeptase? did you feel it was helping? I tried it, but probably not consistently enough or long enough -

I think I told you that the boswellia has been helping me too - the Solaray brand has the cats claw in it too, which is supposed to also help.

Thanks,
Victoria

[This Message was Edited on 06/02/2004]
 

tansy

New Member
more than anything, if I want to add something new to my regime something else needs to go. I did get a lot of smelly gas with this, others have reported it too, but that went down after I'd been on it a while longer. I saw it as a sign that it was doing it's job. I've had a lot of problems and pain in my GI tract.

It's really good for breaking down scar tissues; ideal for use after surgery once any risks of bleeding have passed, there's less post operative pain too when it's used. Some find it really good for arthritis pain, but like a lot of "natural" remedies it takes a little time for the benefits to show.

Plnatscaper

You know how it is for us; most of the things we take are for long term benefit, we hope they're helping but sometimes we're not sure. Well Boswelia in one of the few which had the most obvious effect of it's own. So many are being helped with this herb, not just those of us with ME/CFS who probably have the RNaseL abnormality, so I thought everyone should at least know about it.

love
Tansy

[This Message was Edited on 06/02/2004]
 

victoria

New Member
meant to say that was devil's claw with the boswellia by solaray, not cat's claw... (made sense at the time :)

I understand Tansy, God knows I spend a lot of $$ on supplements and am always trying to cut down in whatever way I can!

All the best,
Victoria
 
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